So you want to become an apprentice in Canada... - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum > Electrical Forum > Electrician Apprentice Forum


Like Tree6Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-15-2015, 12:18 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Vintage Sounds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Toronto area, ON, Canada
Posts: 3,238
Rewards Points: 3,986
Default So you want to become an apprentice in Canada...

In this thread I'll attempt to create a reference resource for new guys starting the trade, collecting information, advice and experiences in a single spot. It should reduce the number of repetitive threads posted by new guys, while at the same time giving them all consistent and (hopefully) accurate information.

While the target audience is Canadian apprentices/hopefuls due to our Red Seal program and relative similarities across the country(and also, that's what I know), I'd like to think a lot of the general information should be applicable to anyone starting out in the electrical trade(s) anywhere. It would be nice if the thread could become a sticky, once it fills out a bit.

This is of course a work in progress so I'd be happy to hear any feedback/recommendations etc.

______________

A little about me: As of this writing(June 14 2015) I'm a 28 year old fourth year apprentice with six months to go before I start my last trade school session. I started in Ontario, where I did my first block of school at Humber College, after which I moved to Alberta and continued my apprenticeship. In that time I've experienced a variety of different types of work and learned to survive in the trade without necessarily being the "ideal candidate".

______________

Intro

So anyway, you're thinking about becoming an electrician. Great. Everyone comes into this trade from somewhere, whether you're an 18 years old and just out of high school, somewhere in your 20s burnt out on university or an unskilled job, or someone who is leaving a different career.

You may have already heard from other people a bunch of things about electrical - or the trades in general - but the reality is that it's an extremely varied field. When I started out I imagined I would mainly be hanging chandeliers for Mrs. Jones. While I did do that, and it is part of our trade, I never imagined at that time that I would later find myself overhauling a 60 year old hydroelectric generator or inside a factory rewiring a machine that carbonates water used in soft drinks. The point here is whatever preconceived ideas you have will most likely not reflect what you experience in the field, so don't get hung up on that stuff. Also, there's nothing wrong with hanging a chandelier for Mrs. Jones.

Part 1: Starting in the trade


How do I start?

You first get a job with a licensed electrical contractor. Notice I underlined that. You can't just get a job working for "a guy" or your uncle or whatever. The employer must put you on payroll. If you fail to make sure of this you are screwing yourself over and will end up with unrecordable experience that will NOT count towards an apprenticeship.

But I have no experience, skills or tools!

Of course you don't. We all started somewhere. Whoever hires you will obviously understand that they are hiring a green person who needs to learn everything from scratch. Yes it can take some time to find someone who will hire a zero-experience hand, but if you really want something, you can't expect it to be handed to you.

I don't like doing hard work, and I heard electrical work is an easy way to make big bucks.

LOL. Nope.

I'm not big and strong. Is that going to be a strike against me?

I'm not big and strong either, but I'm doing okay. There is room for various shapes and sizes of people because the work is varied. Last year I was on a crew with a guy who was 6'7" and a female apprentice who was 5'0".

I'm a woman and I want to get into the trade, but it seems to be male-dominated.

Well, it's true that electrical, and construction in general is a male-dominated field, but so what? It's 2015 and you shouldn't let people's preconceptions prevent you from doing a job you like. One of the best journeymen I have ever worked with was actually a journeywoman. I've worked with plenty of female sparkies and if I was to compare the number of good ones to crappy ones, the percentage of good ones is much higher than for men. This is just my experience.

It's an unfortunate reality that in this day and age sexual harassment is still something that's out there every day. You have to be prepared to stand up for yourself and know your rights.

How do I get a job with an electrical contractor?

You'll probably have to take a multi-pronged approach. In other words, yeah, look on Kijiji, Craigslist, Indeed, etc online to find people who are hiring. Many people make the mistake of stopping there. You should also look at people who are NOT hiring. Look up electrical contractors in your area and contact them directly. Find their shops and go in person. Bring your resume with you. You need to be persistent and resourceful. Realise that the owner of an electrical contracting company is a busy individual and don't waste their time. You could also go to an electrical supply wholesaler and ask if someone there knows a contractor looking for people. Give them your name and number. Someone might be asking. You could also get a job at a wholesaler as a step into the trade.

If someone calls you for an interview - and this should be common sense - don't show up looking like an idiot. Wear some decent clean clothes(no lame Metal Mulisha logo t-shirts, but also don't wear a suit), cut your hair, shave, put on a belt...whatever it takes. Use your head.

I don't have a resume or my resume is crappy and out of date.

If you don't fix this you're going to have a very hard time. There are lots of free online resources for making resumes. No spelling or grammar errors. Later, I'll add some links to resources here.

What should I expect to get paid?

A first year apprentice normally makes a percentage of what the company is paying its journeymen. It varies by province, but Alberta for example, starts at 50%. You should get a raise each time you move up a level.

That being said, lots of times, especially with small companies, they will just give you a "take it or leave it" number. It may not be high but it should be above minimum. I don't like this and it's not exactly legal, but at least when I was back in Ontario it seemed like a lot of ECs were getting away with this. Depending on your situation and the job market you may decide to accept this in order to get your foot in the door and gain some experience.

If you are a union apprentice, the union collective bargaining agreement determines what you will be paid.

What happens after getting a job?

You need to get yourself registered(in some provinces the preferred term is "indentured") as an apprentice. This means involving a government agency, which will be different in every province and therefore have its own procedures. Generally this involves filling out some forms, meeting some people, and signing a contract of apprenticeship. Sometimes if you have past experience in something similar, they may be willing to give you some credit. This contract is what enables you to do electrical work for your employer. It is otherwise illegal for someone to go and do electrical work somewhere except for their own homes.

The contract also stipulates that you must finish your apprenticeship and become a journeyman by a specified date or your apprenticeship is null and void. In other words you can't just avoid taking your final exam and be a fourth year forever. By the way, people who do that are losers.

Also, you must become registered/indentured ASAP. Again, rules vary by province, but when I started in Ontario the rule was it had to be within the first three months.

Alberta: Apprenticeship and Industry Training (AIT)
British Columbia: Industry Training Authority (IAT)
Manitoba: Apprenticeship Manitoba
New Brunswick: Post Secondary Education, Training & Labour (PETL)
Newfoundland: Department of Advanced Education and Skills
Nova Scotia: Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
Ontario: Ministry of Training, Colleges & Apprenticeships
Northwest Territories: Education, Culture and Employment
Nunavut: Department of Family Services
Prince Edward Island: Department of Workforce and Advanced Learning
Quebec: Emploi Quebec
Saskatchewan: Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission
Yukon: Department of Education

How long does it take to get through an apprenticeship?

Around 4 to 5 years. Every province has a different number of hours you need to complete. Ontario requires 9000, Alberta 6000, Saskatchewan 7200, etc etc. Later I'll post every province's requirement here. In the mean time, I'm sure if you do some research you can find out what applies to you. Apart from just accumulating a bunch of on-the-job hours, you also have to go to trade school 3 to 4 times during your apprenticeship.

School?!?! Nobody told me about this, and besides I hate school!

Well, suck it up princess. Trade school is a part of the deal. You will have to take 2 to 3 months off work every time. This is your career we're talking about.

What's all this stuff about ratios?

In the context of apprenticeship, the term ratio refers to the number of journeymen to apprentices allowable by law at a given employer. Each province has different rules on this which means you need to find out what applies to you. For example, Ontario requires 3 journeymen for each apprentice, whereas Alberta allows two apprentices for each journeyman, or in other words 0.5:1. At some point I will list each province and territory's ratio here.

Why is ratio important?

If your employer is not compliant with the ratio requirement(i.e. too many apprentices and not enough journeymen) it means you can't be registered as an apprentice and therefore your experience and hours won't be recorded. This is a very bad situation to be in. You need to find a new employer immediately because you are otherwise wasting your time. There are no exceptions to this.

What about one of those pre-employment programs or "electrical colleges? Will that help me get a job?

Maybe, but - I personally don't like the concept. You have to pay them lots of money - as in thousands - to learn a bunch of stuff you'll learn in the trade anyway. Some people come out of these programs thinking they know everything and end up getting a rude awakening once they actually enter the trade.

Having said that, it seems to be a trend that's spreading. I know and work with a lot of people who have gone through these programs and they seem happy(and more importantly, employed). If you're convinced it'll help you get your foot in the door and you're okay with shelling out that kind of money, go for it. However, look around. Pretty much 99% of electricians out there have made it without these programs.

Do I need my own vehicle?

Yes. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. You don't need a truck or anything special. If you're unable to afford much all you should focus on is getting something reliable, cheap to buy, cheap to operate and cheap to insure.

IMPORTANT: NEVER transport any company tools or materials in your personal vehicle under any circumstances. You don't have the proper insurance coverage for that and if you end up having to make an insurance claim(say, if you had an accident) your insurance company would just love to find out that you were doing something outside the terms of your policy so they can deny you coverage! For that matter I have recently been informed that even transporting your personal tools in your car as you go from site to site constitutes "commercial use" so you need to think about getting commercial insurance, which - yes - costs more. You really need to talk to someone who deals with auto insurance to get an idea of what is required.

Part 1A What about being unionised?

For the most part unionised electricians in Canada(and also the USA) are represented by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. This union is by far the oldest and largest, and so it has hundreds of locals. You'll have to find the one that is local to you. Depending on the size of the local their apprenticeship system may be almost completely in-house or it may not be any different from non-union.

There is also the Canadian Union of Skilled Workers(formerly IBEW local 1788) and the Christian Labour Association of Canada.

Unions are corrupt scumbag organisations that just serve themselves and are full of lazy people etc etc

or

Unions are super amazing and everyone who isn't union is a thankless underpaid rat with inferior skills etc etc


We aren't going to get into that here. You should also avoid doing so in real life.

How does being in a union work?

I don't know about the other unions, so I can only talk about the IBEW here, and I'm going to greatly simplify for the sake of making this easy to read. I'm not union, but I was for a year. If there's anything inaccurate here I'm sure the union guys on this forum can let me know/yell at me.

The IBEW basically works like a big temp agency. You don't simply walk up to a union electrical shop and hand in your resume to get hired. When a unionised contractor requires electricians, they inform the local union. The local then puts out a call for whatever number of electricians the contractor asked for.

In the mean time, when union electricians are out of work, they are supposed to sign the out of work list at the local's dispatch office. The expectation is that you sign as soon as you are laid off from wherever you were previously working. This way, when new work becomes available, the guys who have been out of work the longest(top of the list) get first crack at it. If they don't want it, the next person gets a chance. When that job is over, if the contractor doesn't still need you for another job, you get laid off and sign the books. Repeat cycle.

When you are out of work, and the union doesn't have a job for you to go to, you are expected to NOT go to work for a non-union electrical contractor. In other words, either sit at home, or do a non-electrical job. Some locals allow an exception to this, as long as you inform them first. You should know the rules before you do something like that, or you may get kicked out and blacklisted.

Apart from that, the union negotiates your pay, benefits and pension on your behalf - which means everyone you work with is paid according to the same agreement. They are supposed to address issues between workers and employers. The local also offers courses you can take to upgrade your skills and qualifications, often at a heavily subsidised rate.

How do I get into the IBEW? I heard there is an aptitude test?

You'll have to to find out from whatever local you're trying to get into, what their exact procedures and requirements are.

You might have to do an aptitude test(a bunch of common sense and logic based things, if I remember correctly. Didn't seem like something you could study for) and come in for an interview. If you get through those things, then you will eventually get placed with a contractor and given a start date.

Should I go union or non union? Which is better?

After more than 100 years of electrical work we still haven't found the answer. You will have to decide for yourself.



To be continued
Vintage Sounds is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Vintage Sounds For This Useful Post:
211mike70 (07-27-2016), Brain John (07-21-2016)
Join Contractor Talk

Join the #1 Electrician Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

ElectricianTalk.com - Are you a Professional Electrical Contractor? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's the leading place for electricians to meet online. No homeowners asking DIY questions. Just fellow tradesmen who enjoy talking about their business, their trade, and anything else that comes up. No matter what your specialty is you'll find that ElectricianTalk.com is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free!

Join ElectricianTalk.com - Click Here JOIN FOR FREE


Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ElectricianTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-15-2015, 12:28 AM   #2
Petulant Amateur
 
99cents's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Perky Nipples, Canada
Posts: 12,088
Rewards Points: 4,356
Default

Tis should be a sticky under the Apprentice section!
99cents is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2015, 02:45 AM   #3
RIP 1959-2015
 
Black Dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Reporting From Fenway Park Home of the Boston Red Sox....
Posts: 10,726
Rewards Points: 130
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vintage Sounds View Post

Vintage Sounds

To be continued
@Vintage Sounds


Good man------

I will push for a sticky on this----Good work
__________________


CS2 Flat Rate
Black Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2015, 06:47 AM   #4
Moderator

 
Dennis Alwon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Posts: 19,168
Rewards Points: 132
Default

Done........
Dennis Alwon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2015, 09:51 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: NL, Canada
Posts: 1,068
Rewards Points: 2,715
Default

I like it! It will be nice to link to this in those generic "how do I become a 'lectrician?" posts.

One correction: Apprenticeships in ON are handled by OCOT now, not MTCU for compulsory trades.
AK_sparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2015, 12:41 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Langley BC canada
Posts: 28
Rewards Points: 54
Default

What an awesome resource. Keep it up
flinnagin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2015, 03:39 AM   #7
professional redneck
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Quebec, Canada
Posts: 119
Rewards Points: 187
Default

in quebec it's a lot harder, yhere is basically three way to became a journeyman
1-do a DEP in electricity, it's a community college thing that last a 2 year, and then pray to find someone who will hire an apprentice
2- have a contractor sign you for 150h and then wait for the job pool to open , wich it never open for any trade
3- do 8000h in less than 5 years at one contractor, if you wish to work for someone else and you do , or your shop close out, you need to restart at zero
metalpats is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2015, 04:04 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Vintage Sounds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Toronto area, ON, Canada
Posts: 3,238
Rewards Points: 3,986
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by metalpats View Post
in quebec it's a lot harder, yhere is basically three way to became a journeyman
1-do a DEP in electricity, it's a community college thing that last a 2 year, and then pray to find someone who will hire an apprentice
2- have a contractor sign you for 150h and then wait for the job pool to open , wich it never open for any trade
3- do 8000h in less than 5 years at one contractor, if you wish to work for someone else and you do , or your shop close out, you need to restart at zero
Wow, that sucks, but thanks for the information. I think when I get a chance to do my next update here I'll create a separate section for Quebec because obviously the process is different there.
Vintage Sounds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2015, 05:50 AM   #9
professional redneck
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Quebec, Canada
Posts: 119
Rewards Points: 187
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vintage Sounds View Post
Wow, that sucks, but thanks for the information. I think when I get a chance to do my next update here I'll create a separate section for Quebec because obviously the process is different there.
i would add that there is no apprenticeship for non union electrician working in theatre and that being an electrician for the show business suck way more than anything i've said the rest of this trade here

that what happen when you let a right wing government enter a parliament that have been on the left side for 30 years, you end up with the worse of both
metalpats is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2015, 06:00 AM   #10
professional redneck
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Quebec, Canada
Posts: 119
Rewards Points: 187
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vintage Sounds View Post
Wow, that sucks, but thanks for the information. I think when I get a chance to do my next update here I'll create a separate section for Quebec because obviously the process is different there.
the best way to do it in quebec is to do the DEP then get an apprenticeship elsewhere in canada, and since all your schooling is done you can challenge the canadian red seal in the first or second year, do 6500h and get back to quebec, then wait 6 month and challenge the journeyman exam
metalpats is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2015, 07:26 PM   #11
Electrical Contractor
 
wcord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Posts: 3,318
Rewards Points: 602
Default

ST. JOHN'S, N.L. -- Apprentices will find it easier to move between the provinces and territories while they are doing their training under an agreement signed by the premiers on Thursday.
Premier Paul Davis of Newfoundland and Labrador says the agreement, which takes effect in January, will help Canada build an educated and skilled workforce.
Nova Scotia has been among the provinces pushing for the changes, which it says will recognize the technical training and relevant hours that are needed by an apprentice to complete their training regardless of where it is done in the country.
Students who graduate from pre-apprenticeship training programs will also get full recognition.
Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil says the agreement will help employers find the skilled workers they need and make it easier for people who have left the province to begin an apprenticeship program elsewhere and want to return home to complete their training.




Hopefully the powers that be, keep a high level of standards for passing.
__________________
Be careful what you wish for, you just may get it.
wcord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2015, 09:37 PM   #12
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 2
Default Can't Find Work

I'm posting this on behalf of my wonderful boyfriend who is in camp for the next eight weeks, doing a job he has hated the last 4 years. However, he is hardworking and does not like to remain idle.

He has just finished his Foundations and Level 1 Electrical training, thinking that this was the right path for him. We are starting to have our doubts now. It's been drilled into our heads during high school that you either go to college, or get a trade.

For the life of him, he cannot find a job. I have sent off over 20 resumes in British Columbia alone, and now I'm starting to apply in Alberta (Since he is in camp now, I have taken this on.) He has called local companies 4 hours in each direction, who are probably about ready to file for a restraining order by now. They probably sit in their office and say, oh it's him again, calling... The poor smuck.

I work for an airline, who steadily books for electrical companies, and I even asked one of them if they ever hire apprentices. They said rarely.

I hear all about this skilled workers shortage and yadah yadah, but I don't see anybody sweating over it. Is there something productive he could be doing while he awaits these elusive opportunities? Or any advice at all?

Thanks!
CMart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2015, 11:28 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Ink&Brass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 398
Rewards Points: 448
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CMart View Post
I'm posting this on behalf of my wonderful boyfriend who is in camp for the next eight weeks, doing a job he has hated the last 4 years. However, he is hardworking and does not like to remain idle.

He has just finished his Foundations and Level 1 Electrical training, thinking that this was the right path for him. We are starting to have our doubts now. It's been drilled into our heads during high school that you either go to college, or get a trade.

For the life of him, he cannot find a job. I have sent off over 20 resumes in British Columbia alone, and now I'm starting to apply in Alberta (Since he is in camp now, I have taken this on.) He has called local companies 4 hours in each direction, who are probably about ready to file for a restraining order by now. They probably sit in their office and say, oh it's him again, calling... The poor smuck.

I work for an airline, who steadily books for electrical companies, and I even asked one of them if they ever hire apprentices. They said rarely.

I hear all about this skilled workers shortage and yadah yadah, but I don't see anybody sweating over it. Is there something productive he could be doing while he awaits these elusive opportunities? Or any advice at all?

Thanks!
It's tricky out there right now. A lot of guys who have spent their whole apprenticeships exclusively doing heavy industrial and/or oilfield electrical are having a hard time even getting an interview because they lack commerical/resi experience, which in AB seems to be where all the work is currently. Being green seems even rougher.
Ink&Brass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2015, 09:55 PM   #14
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 2
Default

Yeah, and Alberta is the last place we want to be. Other than Saskatchewan where he is drilling now. Ick!

I will keep on trying to find these opportunities. But I feel like he missed the boat. We blew through our savings while he was off for 5 months in school and I ended up gaining 4 jobs working 80 hours to cover the bill too.

This decision to go this path has driven me almost mad, but I feel more sorry for him. He really enjoyed school and he's smart and hardworking. But well keep our heads up and hope something comes along soon. A mine just got approved in kitimat I think. Maybe they'll have SOMETHING for him.

Thanks
CMart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2015, 12:54 AM   #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Calgary
Posts: 14
Rewards Points: 24
Default

My 2 cents ...
I took the pre-employment program and I got a job right after finishing school.
From my experience the pre-employment program does NOT help to get a job. You'll be seen as a green person, but it helps a lot after getting a job because it's a lot easier to learn when you have already some basic knowledge, and you can also challenge the 1st year apprenticeship when you finish the program (at least in Alberta).
I had a list of all the electrical companies where I live, and I used to go to at least 1 company every morning at 6:30am to introduce myself and give them my resume. I'm an introvert so I hated doing that but I did anyway.
As a first year apprentice, you won't find a job just sending resumes online. You have to put yourself out there. I know a guy who got a job after visiting the same electrical company 6 times ... Seriously!
But getting a job is just 50% of the challenge, you also need to survive in the trade.
As a first year apprentice you'll work a lot and you won't make a lot of money. You must be a quick learner, nobody will hold your hand and explain the same thing 10 times. You'll also encounter some ***holes journeyman and apprentices.

It can be a lot of fun if you really like the trade but certainly it's not for everyone.
willian.yyc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2015, 08:55 PM   #16
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Edmonton AB
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 2
Default

I'm trying hard to become an apprentice and doing everything I can, I'm enrolling into pre apprenticeship training and in the mean time applying to any job postings cold calling places and showing up to places and dropping off resumes.

I've also been taking advantage of some free online training/educational resources such as youtube and others my question is this what topics am I best off to study which will best prepare me? I want to study up on topics which will best help.

Also if anyone has any other advice or reccomend any further steps I should be taken I'd greatly appreciate it.

Thank you.
Dshervank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2015, 12:31 PM   #17
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 16
Default

I've finished my pre apprenticeship with a 3.8 GPA, 2 years ago. And still looking for a company to hire me. I must of sent out over 500 applications with no reply.

Any advice?
Coresel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2015, 12:53 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: NL, Canada
Posts: 1,068
Rewards Points: 2,715
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coresel View Post
I've finished my pre apprenticeship with a 3.8 GPA, 2 years ago. And still looking for a company to hire me. I must of sent out over 500 applications with no reply.

Any advice?
500 applications and not even a reply? I'd say there's something really wrong with your resume.
AK_sparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2015, 12:53 PM   #19
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 16
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AK_sparky View Post
500 applications and not even a reply? I'd say there's something really wrong with your resume.
I'll PM you my resume
Coresel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2015, 02:31 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: NL, Canada
Posts: 1,068
Rewards Points: 2,715
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coresel View Post
I'll PM you my resume
Feel free to if you want. I don't mind having a quick look over it.

One option some people have done is to volunteer at a Habitat for Humanity build. I haven't done it so YMMV. It could be a good place to network with some of the trades. Bring donuts and coffee and let guys know you are looking for electrical work...Then work your butt off!

You could also try the supply houses. They sometimes hear of stuff from their customers.

Where in Canada are you? I just moved to NL and it's pretty slow here right now.
AK_sparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trip to Canada Galt Off Topic (Non Trade) 9 07-09-2016 12:10 AM
Apprentice Questions aekastr Union Topics 11 05-28-2016 03:24 PM
can this motor use in Canada? mike883 General Electrical Discussion 6 05-18-2016 08:43 AM
Hours for Apprentice Wireman Lakesmith Union Topics 4 04-15-2016 08:11 PM
Apprentiship for older men in Canada with previous expericance lortech Canadian Electrical Code Forum 3 03-24-2016 09:59 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com