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Old 09-23-2015, 01:40 PM   #21
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I'm in Toronto. I've tried everything. I've stood outside electrical suppliers at 6am handing out my resume, I've worked for free for a week to prove myself.

I am highly capable. I've got my own tools/vehicle. I don't know what the problem is. Bad luck?
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Old 09-23-2015, 04:16 PM   #22
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I'm in Toronto. I've tried everything. I've stood outside electrical suppliers at 6am handing out my resume, I've worked for free for a week to prove myself.

I am highly capable. I've got my own tools/vehicle. I don't know what the problem is. Bad luck?
Wow, that's rather strange. It sounds like they don't like green guys in TO. I'm in Barrie and have helped a couple of guys get their foot in the door. One suggestion would be to try and get in with an electrical company as a laborer. It's crappy work, but if you work hard, have a good attitude and learn fast, it usually pays off. I had a guy on my job a few years ago who came in with four guys from labor ready. At the end of the day, he was the only guy left. Three months later I had the boss sign him up as an apprentice.
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Old 09-23-2015, 06:05 PM   #23
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I took a look at your resume. It could be cleaned up a bit for "flow", but really it should be fine. I didn't see anything on it that should be a red flag keeping you from getting responses.

I guess keep knocking on doors. Good luck.
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Old 09-23-2015, 07:22 PM   #24
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I'm trying hard to become an apprentice and doing everything I can, I'm enrolling into pre apprenticeship training and in the mean time applying to any job postings cold calling places and showing up to places and dropping off resumes.

I've also been taking advantage of some free online training/educational resources such as youtube and others my question is this what topics am I best off to study which will best prepare me? I want to study up on topics which will best help.

Also if anyone has any other advice or reccomend any further steps I should be taken I'd greatly appreciate it.

Thank you.
First Aid Course from St Johns Ambulance or equivalent
Up to date criminal records check
Drivers abstract
Keep your resume short and include things that would be pertinent to the trade.

In this day, if you have first aid you should at least get a phone call.
Drivers abstract and criminal record check saves employer from having to do it later.
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Old 09-24-2015, 12:35 AM   #25
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I've finished my pre apprenticeship with a 3.8 GPA, 2 years ago. And still looking for a company to hire me. I must of sent out over 500 applications with no reply.

Any advice?
Though I haven't hired in the electrical field, I have close to 10 yrs. experience hiring people. My only advice would be to keep it to 1 page.

Don't cram everything to make it into 1 page.

You may think some things are important to include, but it may not relate to the field.

This may seem difficult, but remember that the person looking at all the resumes may be knee-deep in them.

Don't repeat yourself.

Forget cover letters unless targeting larger companies with an HR department.

Say as much as you can in as few words as possible - brevity is key.

Use bold and/or highlighting font to organize sections/heading/etc.

Show your resume to someone in an HR/hiring position for feedback (doesn't have to be in the electrical field).

What you want, ultimately, is a job.
- the resume gets you noticed/phone call
- the phone call gets you the interview
- the interview gives you the time to fill in the blanks and sell yourself.
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Old 10-26-2015, 11:34 PM   #26
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I would recommend taking a pre-apprenticeship course. Here in BC, They are quite common. It gives you your first year qualification (minus the hours) and they will generally place you with a company to work with during the pre-apprenticeship program, with a possibility of getting hired on with the company if you're any good and they're in need of apprentices.
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Old 11-28-2015, 05:16 PM   #27
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Sask here,

Don't do pre employment. Your school hours count towards your apprenticeship hours and puts you at a higher pay grade than a green guy who didn't go to school. However, a pre em graduate and a green guy have both never spent a day in the field so some companies don't want to pay you extra when your experience level is no different than a guy they pulled off the street.
Find a company who does larger sites (schools, hospitals). Often when it comes time to put in hundreds of switches and receptacles, the company will hire guys off the street for bare bones pay to do the simple work, then lay most of them off. If you can get on doing monkey work, at least your foot is in the door and maybe you can prove yourself capable enough to not be let go later.
And don't get excited and do something dumb like buy a new truck because "now you're a tradesman". Your job security is low your 1st and 4th year. 1st because you're new and they're feeling you out, 4th because they're monitoring your skill level to see if you're worth a 30% increase in pay when you become a journeyman.
Have no life for only 4 years, focus on your job, and you're set from there.
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Old 11-28-2015, 07:27 PM   #28
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Sask here,

Don't do pre employment. Your school hours count towards your apprenticeship hours and puts you at a higher pay grade than a green guy who didn't go to school. However, a pre em graduate and a green guy have both never spent a day in the field so some companies don't want to pay you extra when your experience level is no different than a guy they pulled off the street.
Find a company who does larger sites (schools, hospitals). Often when it comes time to put in hundreds of switches and receptacles, the company will hire guys off the street for bare bones pay to do the simple work, then lay most of them off. If you can get on doing monkey work, at least your foot is in the door and maybe you can prove yourself capable enough to not be let go later.
And don't get excited and do something dumb like buy a new truck because "now you're a tradesman". Your job security is low your 1st and 4th year. 1st because you're new and they're feeling you out, 4th because they're monitoring your skill level to see if you're worth a 30% increase in pay when you become a journeyman.
Have no life for only 4 years, focus on your job, and you're set from there.
Great advice, hope it gets read. thread is a month old.
I've made the same mistake many times. Another mistake I make is not paying attention to what page I'm on in the thread. So I post something brilliant and it has nothing to do with where the thread has gone. This is just a heads up from one Canuck to another.
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Old 11-28-2015, 08:48 PM   #29
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We don't pay our Pre-apprenticeship guys any more than a green guy until after 6 months working with us here in Northern BC.
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Old 11-30-2015, 01:08 AM   #30
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Yeah I don't think any pre app's care about being paid a few bucks more an hour, would gladly work for minimum wage just for a chance to prove myself. I know my brother started as a term 2 instead of 1 in the IBEW but I wouldn't expect a private company to do that also. Few greenish guys I know work for 11-12 an hour wiring up 5 million dollar homes just to get some hours and experience.
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Old 12-20-2015, 02:45 AM   #31
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This is how you apply to the IBEW in the Toronto area (although our local has now merged with Barrie and Oshawa). Check this page weekly starting in February or March.

http://www.electricalapprenticeship....struction.html

Oh, and anyone who tells you there is a "shortage" of workers in a field is full of **** and has an agenda. When I applied to the JAC over 10 years ago around 600 people applied that intake and 120 got accepted. Ask anyone who went into law or teaching in Ontario in the last 10 years because of the supposed "shortage" how easy it was to find work after they graduated. You can safely take what the government and media tell you and assume 90% of it is the complete opposite of the truth and it will serve you well in life.

If you're not able to get an apprenticeship in the trade you prefer, consider another trade or at least find a construction job so you have something construction related to put on your resume. Another job you can try to get in the meantime is at an electrical wholesaler (eg. Nedco), you will learn the materials of the trade and you can talk to lots of electrical contractors.
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Old 02-08-2016, 05:46 PM   #32
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i m preparing for main c of q exam.
can u pls suggest me good books and give me sample papers,
my mail id : starconstructions8@gmail.com
thanks a lot
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Old 03-31-2016, 08:41 PM   #33
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This is how you apply to the IBEW in the Toronto area (although our local has now merged with Barrie and Oshawa). Check this page weekly starting in February or March.

http://www.electricalapprenticeship....struction.html

Oh, and anyone who tells you there is a "shortage" of workers in a field is full of **** and has an agenda. When I applied to the JAC over 10 years ago around 600 people applied that intake and 120 got accepted. Ask anyone who went into law or teaching in Ontario in the last 10 years because of the supposed "shortage" how easy it was to find work after they graduated. You can safely take what the government and media tell you and assume 90% of it is the complete opposite of the truth and it will serve you well in life.

If you're not able to get an apprenticeship in the trade you prefer, consider another trade or at least find a construction job so you have something construction related to put on your resume. Another job you can try to get in the meantime is at an electrical wholesaler (eg. Nedco), you will learn the materials of the trade and you can talk to lots of electrical contractors.
The worker shortage might affect any trade EXCEPT the electrical one. There's always going to be work, but the industry is SATURATED with electricians. You only need to look up your town's yellow pages to realize that, and that's just the listed companies. The big commercial ones with 100's of guys employed aren't even usually on the YP.

That's not meant to make anyone give up or anything, but simply an explanation why finding an apprenticeship can be so hard. It took me 4 years to land one, and it wasn't until I'd spent those 4 years doing datacom and fire alarm/security/access control and learned as many skills as possibly without getting an actual apprenticeship that I did get one.
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Old 07-15-2016, 11:09 AM   #34
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Interesting read;

One thing that I missed, or wasn't covered in the OP's write up was:

If someone is indentured as an apprentice in say NS, but needs to travel for work. Would the apprenticeship be interprovincial, or would you need to be indentured all over again in the working province, and file all paper work accordingly?

My understanding of Journeymen/Red seal, is that your journeyman's ticket is provincial or territorial to where you earned it but are then able to write a red seal test which would let you work inter provincially?

Would seem that the apprenticeship would follow the same suite?

If this is the case, how often are other provinces willing to take a registered apprentice from one province, and deal with getting him signed on in another?
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Old 07-29-2016, 07:31 AM   #35
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Interesting read;

One thing that I missed, or wasn't covered in the OP's write up was:

If someone is indentured as an apprentice in say NS, but needs to travel for work. Would the apprenticeship be interprovincial, or would you need to be indentured all over again in the working province, and file all paper work accordingly?

My understanding of Journeymen/Red seal, is that your journeyman's ticket is provincial or territorial to where you earned it but are then able to write a red seal test which would let you work inter provincially?

Would seem that the apprenticeship would follow the same suite?

If this is the case, how often are other provinces willing to take a registered apprentice from one province, and deal with getting him signed on in another?
Harmonization Update
In 2013, the Canadian Council of the Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA) launched its Harmonization Initiative. This initiative aims to substantively align apprenticeship systems across Canada by making training requirements more consistent in the Red Seal trades. Through national consultation with industry and training stakeholders, the initiative seeks consensus for consistency on the Canada-wide use of Red Seal trade names, numbers of levels, and total training hours (both technical training and on-the-job). Finally, using the most recent National Occupational Analyses (NOA’s) or Red Seal Occupational Standards (RSOS’s), industry and training stakeholders provide feedback on the development of a more consistent sequence of training content across the levels of technical training. Harmonization will support mobility of apprentices, an increase in their completion rates and enable employers to access a larger pool of apprentices.

Having completed much of the work for Phase 1, which involved 10 trades, the CCDA most recently launched Phase 2 of the initiative with the next eight trades (see Red Seal website for the list of these trades). Manitoba and local stakeholders have participated in the national consultations for all trades that are designated in the Province.

List of trades for which Manitoba provided or will provide industry and training stakeholder input:
Carpenter
Welder
Ironworker (Generalist)
Mobile Crane Operator
Tower Crane Operator
Heavy Duty Equipment Technician
Agricultural Equipment Technician
Truck and Transport Mechanic
Automotive Service Technician
Construction Electrician
Industrial Electrician
Industrial Mechanic (Millwright)
Plumber
Steamfitter/Pipefitter


Not sure, but I thought that years ago, MB, SK and AB had harmonized the program for electrical apprentices. Never met anyone that moved during their apprenticeship.
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Old 07-29-2016, 10:43 AM   #36
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Here is more information regarding apprentices etc for the Red Seal Trades in Canada.

http://www.red-seal.ca/about/ccd.1-eng.html
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Old 07-29-2016, 02:26 PM   #37
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I'm in Toronto. I've tried everything. I've stood outside electrical suppliers at 6am handing out my resume, I've worked for free for a week to prove myself.

I am highly capable. I've got my own tools/vehicle. I don't know what the problem is. Bad luck?
Any guy that would have you do that and not actually pay you isn't worth working for. What a special kind of a Dbag!
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Old 09-29-2016, 02:41 PM   #38
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Hey everybody,

My name is Max and I am looking to begin my career in the electrical trade. Since the age of six, I have been fascinated with electrical wiring, and have dreamed of becoming an electrician for years now. As a recent high school graduate, I am finally able to bring this dream into reality via apprenticeship.

After lurking here for the last while, I have gained an excellent set of resources for pursuing an the dream - specifically, this thread (thank you Vintage Sounds)! However, upon handing a plethora of résumés to numerous electrical contractors and a local supply house, the consensus is - no pre-apprenticeship course, no apprenticeship.

Back-tracking, I have been volunteering at a local Habitat For Humanity ReStore, putting in over 1200 hours working with light fixtures, ceiling fans, building test equipment, etcetera. I have also worked on various electrical projects around the home, going so far as bending conduit (for practice) and creating a mock sub-panel setup on a plywood board.

With all of this experience, what I am wondering is - how much value would a pre-apprenticeship course actually provide? Is it worth "biting the bullet" and taking the course, or can my 1200 hours at the ReStore plus various home projects be counted towards First Year experience?



I am open to any suggestions you guys may provide



Thanks,

Max
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Old 10-05-2016, 12:21 PM   #39
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Im filling out a application to have funding to start the training to be an electrician, I have to fill out 3 Interviews for the funding, if i could please get help with this any person in the electrician occupation is welcome, I appreciate it very much.

Questions are
1. Contact Name: Occupation: Years:
Company Name, Adresse and Phone

Hours of work(shifts, weekends, ot, availability)

Places of work ( environment, sectors, location accessibility, paperwork/academics, workplace expectations)

physical expectations

occupation health and safety considersations (health risks, workplace risks, long term effects, work/life balance)

what duties can you expect to do as a first or second year apprentice

what kind of skills and qualities do you think someone needs to be successful as in your trade/occupation?

other notes you would like to add:
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Old 10-05-2016, 08:37 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by nasali View Post
Im filling out a application to have funding to start the training to be an electrician, I have to fill out 3 Interviews for the funding, if i could please get help with this any person in the electrician occupation is welcome, I appreciate it very much.

Questions are
1. Contact Name: Occupation: Years:
Company Name, Adresse and Phone

Hours of work(shifts, weekends, ot, availability)

Places of work ( environment, sectors, location accessibility, paperwork/academics, workplace expectations)

physical expectations

occupation health and safety considersations (health risks, workplace risks, long term effects, work/life balance)

what duties can you expect to do as a first or second year apprentice

what kind of skills and qualities do you think someone needs to be successful as in your trade/occupation?

other notes you would like to add:
Long read , my apologies for out typing Tesla lol

The type of work a first year electrician apprentice does can be different depending on where they’re working. All electricians have had different experiences during their first year as an apprentice.

The great thing about being an apprentice is that they aren’t required to know anything about the trade. Apprentices learn the trade over time because the journeyman or foreman will show the apprentice how to do everything.

First Year Apprentice Electrician Duties
Digging trenches for running underground electrical pipe (conduit)
Load / unload equipment and material
Pull wire and install electrical devices (maybe small or large)
Learn how to bend conduit and install it
Get material to help the journeyman complete tasks
Clean up at the end of the day.
The time of year, type of electrical work, and phase of construction will dictate the type of work the apprentice will be doing.

Requirements To Become An Electrician Apprentice
Apprentice Electricians are required to take a certain amount of academic courses each year. The amount varies between each licensing agency; this is usually a Provincial requirement.

Topics of training can include electrical theory, blueprint reading, current Canadian Electrical Code . In some apprenticeships schooling, the apprentices also learn first aid, some PLC programming, control wiring

Specialized training in areas such as welding, communications, or fire alarm systems can lead to acquiring other certifications which increases the apprentices value. These usually are something you obtain once you get your Red Seal

The Golden Rules For All New Apprentices

Show up to work on time

It’s quite simple really – if a new hire can’t show up to work on time – they’re gone.

Have a good attitude

Attitude plays a big part on how you’re treated and what types of jobs you’ll be involved with.

If you have a poor attitude you’re either going to become a professional ditch digger or standing in the back of the unemployment line – so stay positive.

Follow instructions

It’s the apprentice’s job to follow instructions, learn, and do the job right the first time.

Plan ahead

When apprentices start learning to plan ahead and prepare the tools / materials for the journeyman it makes a great impression – and improves efficiency on the job.

Don’t distract your journeyman from their job

An apprentice’s job is to help the journeyman electrician work faster – wait to ask questions.

Be prepared to work outside your comfort zone

You will work in extremely hot or cold conditions, so you will have to learn how to dress.
You will work at heights, on extension ladders, man lifts, scaffolding
You will work in the mud, up to your ass. You could work in a barn, in crap.
You will work in dirty, miserable smelling ( think sewage ) places
You will use muscles you never knew you had.

Tips All First Year Electricians Should Know the following:

It is not your job to know what to do next.

That comes with time and experience. If you don’t know what to do next, or have no job to do, do not feel guilty.

Some people ask the job site foreman for another task or you simply start sweeping. Sweeping is the default, “I’m out of work to do” task that gets the point across without you bothering anyone.

It is your supervisor’s job to delegate work. It is your job to do the work he has delegated.

As long as you are doing the work you have been delegated, you are a successful apprentice, and should not stress.

Starting a new career can be very stressful.

You should find a way to relax when you get home, and not dread coming into work the next day. It may take a month or two.

This does not mean drinking a 12 pack of Schlitz while you eat your TV dinner.

Go to the gym, ride a bike, build a shelf, or even better, read.

Arrive early and stay late for the first week.

Live your job and over commit for a while. This will break you of any desire to “clock out early” or “cut corners”.

You’ll beat it into your head that this is your life now, and you’ll stop trying to be sneaky with the time sheets.

After that you can start scaling back your involvement to a more reasonable level, and focus on doing your 8 and going home.

You might want to try only calling people “sir” when they’re delegating work to you properly.

If a journeyman is acting like an idiot, do the job – but be reserved.

If they’re good with delegating work and teaching stuff when they can, start throwing out “sir’s” like you’re in the military – it helps reinforce that your loyalty is earned.

If a supervisor is being a jerk, be polite.

If he’s yelling at you about not picking up one little piece of trash or he’s just not treating you with respect, be OVERLY polite.

It’s like passive aggressiveness, but it’s less passive.

“I’m sorry about not picking that trash up. It makes both myself and the company look much less professional than we should. Thank you for holding me to the standards this job demands”.

The key is to be genuine with the apology so he knows you’ve learned from your error, but over do it so he has NO REASON to be a **** afterward.

If he keeps acting like an asshole at that point you’re justified in giving it right back to him.

But doing so requires that you actually DO learn from your mistakes and try your hardest not to make them again.



Lunch and break time are HOLY to construction workers.

If you don’t eat lunch, bring carrots or at least a drink to the site so you look like you’re waiting to go back to work – laborers get put off by that.

There’s also a pattern to break time, and it goes like this:

Resting/eating joking for the first 80%, talking about the job you’re doing or will currently do for the last 15% (“So we’re bringing power to this room from this conduit here, right?”), and watching the supervisor for when he stops breaking during the last 5% – this is when the break is over.

Look for the signs of each phase and you’ll never be out of place.

Be around.

Turning into a phantom and disappearing before lunch and ghosting back to work afterwards is a no-no. These stupid acts will get you **** canned faster than Usain Bolt’s 100 meter sprint.

No one likes open-ended problems.

If you present someone with a problem – some factoid that will slow down progress – you should also present them with a possible solution – or a path to finding the solution.

Your supervisors will get all pissy if you stack problems onto their plate and don’t include ways to solve those problems.

If I don’t have a solution for a problem, get one of the other apprentices to bring it up to a manager.

Don’t be a smart ass, but be smart.

If your supervisor asks you to fetch something for him, but he didn’t specify exactly what he wanted, and he’s also the type of person to get pissy when you ask him to be specific – you’re better off just grabbing everything he might possibly have been referring to and presenting them all to him like, “take your pick”.

It gets the point across that he needs to be more informative and also conveying that you’ll do your best with the info you’re given

You will be teased and the brunt of some good natured jokes. ( of course there is always the as##le who doesn't know when to stop)
Weakness is like blood to a shark, so don't show it.
Eventually you will learn how to give and take the ribbing.


There's more but hopefully this is a good start
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