CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum > Electrical Forum > General Electrical Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-20-2009, 11:17 PM   #1
Hooked on toutons
 
electricnewf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 334
Rewards Points: 250
Default Is being an Electrician really for me?

Hey all,

I'm currently in college completing my Electrician pre-apprenticeship. I really like the program so far, but am still not sure if it's really for me. A few years ago I was in a car accident and hurt my back, so I can't lift anything over 30-40kg. I volunteered as an Electrician apprentice (under supervision) to build a house for Habitat For Humanity. It was a really hot day and I became very exhausted pulling wires through beams and mounting boxes for most of the day. I consider myself to be a very physically fit person (I go to the gym 6 times/week) but does being an electrician mean having to work in very hot conditions where there is a risk of heat exhaustion? I don't mind getting my hands dirty and I've had my share of cuts and bruises during my college program, but if I find myself being exhausted every day after work (when I do start) then this trade might not work for me. Thanks for your input!

electricnewf is offline   Reply With Quote
Join Contractor Talk

Join the #1 Electrician Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

ElectricianTalk.com - Are you a Professional Electrical Contractor? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's the leading place for electricians to meet online. No homeowners asking DIY questions. Just fellow tradesmen who enjoy talking about their business, their trade, and anything else that comes up. No matter what your specialty is you'll find that ElectricianTalk.com is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free!

Join ElectricianTalk.com - Click Here JOIN FOR FREE


Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ElectricianTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Old 08-20-2009, 11:24 PM   #2
Pure Evil
 
drsparky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Presque Isle, Maine
Posts: 5,983
Rewards Points: 2,068
Default

About 34Kg (75 lbs) is all I feel is safe to lift alone; yes it can be a hot, dirty, cold wet, dry, noisy career.

__________________

drsparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2009, 11:30 PM   #3
Hooked on toutons
 
electricnewf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 334
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by drsparky View Post
About 34Kg (75 lbs) is all I feel is safe to lift alone; yes it can be a hot, dirty, cold wet, dry, noisy career.
Would an Industrial Electrician have to worry about very hot conditions, if they are working in a factory?
electricnewf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2009, 11:51 PM   #4
Member
 
barlow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Salem NJ
Posts: 38
Rewards Points: 25
Default

It depends on what kind of factory. Some factorys are hotter than others depending on the season and what not. Some factorys you may not be that busy, you may come in on your shift and swap out a breaker or two or replace a motor and thats it for the rest of the night and sometimes you may wish you called in sick that day. You could try a hi rise office building setting. At least you're in the ac all day.
barlow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2009, 11:54 PM   #5
Hooked on toutons
 
electricnewf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 334
Rewards Points: 250
Default

So I guess I shouldn't have much to worry about in that regard?
electricnewf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 12:02 AM   #6
Pure Evil
 
drsparky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Presque Isle, Maine
Posts: 5,983
Rewards Points: 2,068
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by electricnewf View Post
Would an Industrial Electrician have to worry about very hot conditions, if they are working in a factory?
Yes, Paper mills are well over 100 degrees, I worked in a Cargill that was 132 near the ceiling, down on the floor it was a balmy 104. Many factories use steam so the humidity is at 100%. I worked in founderys with white hot metal passing by. The only factories I can think have that had AC were pharmaceutical and computer chips.
__________________

drsparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 12:11 AM   #7
Hooked on toutons
 
electricnewf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 334
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by drsparky View Post
Yes, Paper mills are well over 100 degrees, I worked in a Cargill that was 132 near the ceiling, down on the floor it was a balmy 104. Many factories use steam so the humidity is at 100%. I worked in founderys with white hot metal passing by. The only factories I can think have that had AC were pharmaceutical and computer chips.
I'm sure the pros of being an Electrician far outweigh this particular con?
electricnewf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 12:28 AM   #8
Member
 
barlow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Salem NJ
Posts: 38
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by drsparky View Post
Yes, Paper mills are well over 100 degrees, I worked in a Cargill that was 132 near the ceiling, down on the floor it was a balmy 104.
Near the ceiling? I worked at Anchor Glass where they make beer and Snapple bottles all day. Its 132 on the floor in Jan! It feels like a convection oven in there. But yes most factorys are hot and noisy. I had to wear long sleeves, safety glasses, hard hat, earplugs with a pair of ear muffs and not the furry kind either! All day except for break and lunch.
barlow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 12:31 AM   #9
Hooked on toutons
 
electricnewf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 334
Rewards Points: 250
Default

I left my previous career as a computer helpdesk tech (a glorified call center) for something a bit more hands on. In your experience do you think I will enjoy being an Electrician?
electricnewf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 01:27 AM   #10
Junior Member
 
Darkjim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Colorado
Posts: 12
Rewards Points: 10
Default

I've worked in a -20 degree F freezer changing out high bay lights to energy saving t5's with motion detectors. Could only stay in there about 45 minutes max, then the hydraulics on the lift would get real sluggish.
Darkjim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 01:44 AM   #11
Eeeeeevil Bitch
 
BCSparkyGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Port Coquitlam, British Columbia
Posts: 2,237
Rewards Points: 1,002
Default If she can do it..........

There are all sorts of things you can do. I have been in the trade for 11-12 years now, and I love it, even being outnumbered by the guys by 30-1 in my company. I have back problems due to a car accident myself, and tendonitis in both wrist, and am still able to carry rolls of bx up 28 stories. Come on now, toughen up young man! You can do it!!!
BCSparkyGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 06:02 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Richard Rowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 142
Rewards Points: 75
Default

The conditions can vary a lot in factories, just depends on what they make. Smaller factories will more likely have maintance personal that can do electrical work as well (or the other way around). Construction work will be job specific to being a true electrician than working in a factory. Now that wonít be the case all the time but I would think mostly it would be true. Electrical work can be really enjoyable, but I hate trouble shooting when you canít find whatís wrong.
Richard Rowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 07:10 AM   #13
Wire Ninja
 
MDShunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Beautiful Cumberland Valley, in PA
Posts: 17,322
Rewards Points: 2,034
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by electricnewf View Post
... but if I find myself being exhausted every day after work (when I do start) then this trade might not work for me. Thanks for your input!
Then, I'd say you should look into something a bit more low impact. Maybe flower arrangement or cake decorating, buff boy.
__________________
One reason not to give DIY advice:
Catch a man a fish and you can sell it to him.
Teach a man to fish and youíve ruined a good business opportunity.
MDShunk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 10:59 AM   #14
Hooked on toutons
 
electricnewf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 334
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MDShunk View Post
Then, I'd say you should look into something a bit more low impact. Maybe flower arrangement or cake decorating, buff boy.
Haha. You're funny
electricnewf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 11:03 AM   #15
child please.....
 
NolaTigaBait's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Hack City, USA aka New Orleans
Posts: 5,287
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by electricnewf View Post
Haha. You're funny
No, seriously.
NolaTigaBait is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 11:20 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Boneshaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Hollis Center Maine
Posts: 194
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Even though it was funny I'm not sure cake decorating is the way to go. MDShunks point being this is a tough trade. People think electrician they think standing in front of a panel terminating wires. Well, for most this is a very small portion of the trade. Running conduit, pulling wire, mounting gear ,setting transformers, climbing, pounding, crouching, this is more the reality of the trade. If you were exhausted from setting boxes and pulling romex I to think you should look into something else. No offense intended, just the facts. There are alot of tough people in this trade, both mentally and physically and thats part of what makes them good at what they do. Good luck in what ever you choose to do.
Boneshaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 11:26 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Calgary Alberta Canada
Posts: 519
Rewards Points: 502
Send a message via MSN to gardiner Send a message via Yahoo to gardiner
Default

As an electrician you would work in all conditions, in Canada count on anything from 32 C with humidex up to 40 to -30 with a wind chill to -50.
During your apprenticeship count on working in it all conditions and weather, don't expect to get into any job where you get protection from having to work in them.
gardiner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 11:31 AM   #18
child please.....
 
NolaTigaBait's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Hack City, USA aka New Orleans
Posts: 5,287
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Man, I couldn't work in Canada. Too cold.
NolaTigaBait is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 01:13 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Calgary Alberta Canada
Posts: 519
Rewards Points: 502
Send a message via MSN to gardiner Send a message via Yahoo to gardiner
Default

Funny the cold doesn't bother me half as much as the heat. You can always put more clothes on but they tend to start arresting you when you take too much off.
gardiner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2009, 01:33 PM   #20
NJ-IEC Member
 
Magnettica's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Rahway, NJ
Posts: 14,147
Rewards Points: 2,036
Default

OH the horror, hot cold sweaty dirty tired.

You're right, u might be better off working in a cubicle.

Magnettica is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why are you an electrician and/or what do you like best about it? Big R General Electrical Discussion 104 06-20-2012 09:02 PM
To be, or not to be an electrician LatinAce General Electrical Discussion 46 07-03-2009 03:50 PM
Becoming an electrician Jpacifico General Electrical Discussion 22 02-09-2009 09:52 PM
Electrician aanoynay General Electrical Discussion 6 01-19-2009 03:43 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:44 AM.


Copyright © 2006-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com