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Old 10-28-2010, 01:55 PM   #1
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Default Garage door opener on GFCI????

This is the first time I have heard a garage door opener needs gfci protection. Seems silly but the inspector is requiring it. Anyone else run into this?

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Old 10-28-2010, 02:10 PM   #2
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It's now in the 08 code.

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Old 10-28-2010, 02:23 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Funkyjunk View Post
This is the first time I have heard a garage door opener needs gfci protection. Seems silly but the inspector is requiring it. Anyone else run into this?
210.8(A)(2) 2008 NEC HANDBOOK Look at the Exhibit 210.10 top left hand side page 83
So GFCI Protection is required
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Old 10-28-2010, 02:25 PM   #4
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It's now in the 08 code.
Yep I see. ALL garage 15 and 20A receps.

How pissed will the HO be when that trips and they cant get in?

I understand the need on a concrete floor but not the cieling.

Maybe my new policy will be to wire the door opener into a switch for disconnecting means and forget the gfi.
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Old 10-28-2010, 02:34 PM   #5
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I just wire them into the same box as the GFI receptacle on the wall in the garage. Makes troubleshooting alot easier if you know what I mean. Funny thing is I never had to troubleshoot those circuits. I think because I put the outdoor recepts. on a different GFI circuit than the garage..
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Old 10-28-2010, 03:06 PM   #6
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I just wire them into the same box as the GFI receptacle on the wall in the garage. Makes troubleshooting alot easier if you know what I mean. Funny thing is I never had to troubleshoot those circuits. I think because I put the outdoor recepts. on a different GFI circuit than the garage..
That can be an issue with art. 210.23(A)(2) with 2 GDO's .

To funkyjunk-- the 2011 will require all GFCI recep. to be readily accessible-- You will now have to install the GFCI in the panel or, as I do, use a dead front GFCI

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Old 10-28-2010, 03:12 PM   #7
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Yep I see. ALL garage 15 and 20A receps.

How pissed will the HO be when that trips and they cant get in?

I understand the need on a concrete floor but not the cieling.

Maybe my new policy will be to wire the door opener into a switch for disconnecting means and forget the gfi.
I fail to see what a 'disconnecting means' has to do with 'gfci protection'. Gfci protection has a different purpose than a disco.

As for a 'homeowner' not being able to get in, is there a reason they can't just (inconvience once)get out of their car and open the garage by hand with their key just for the 1 time that it might have tripped? Probably the MOST exercise that some people get seeing how much weight we have gained. Now Im getting off topic.

Or as someone said, you can wire it off the gfci outside if you want (I wouldn't do it that way) so if needs reseting they can do it from outside when they drive up.
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Old 10-28-2010, 10:24 PM   #8
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I fail to see what a 'disconnecting means' has to do with 'gfci protection'. Gfci protection has a different purpose than a disco.
does he mean cutting off the plug and hard wiring it to a 4" sq.box with a switch? No plug means no GFI. Only probs w/ that are that it could exceed max height for switch? Void warranty of garage door opener?

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As for a 'homeowner' not being able to get in, is there a reason they can't just (inconvience once)get out of their car and open the garage by hand with their key just for the 1 time that it might have tripped?
Because the night that it happens they don't have their key and it's pouring rain out and it's dark and it's late. I understand the spirit of this code but I think an exception for G.D.O.s should be made if there are a specified number of plugs installed the garage. That way H.O.s wont be tempted to use the plug on the ceiling.
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Old 10-28-2010, 10:31 PM   #9
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Single receptacle, maybe?
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Old 10-28-2010, 10:34 PM   #10
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Speaking of GFI's causing aggravation, what do you guys typically do about condensate pumps for air furnaces in basements? Once I had a GFI trip that the pump was plugged into, the high water float switch on the pump either got stuck or was defective. As a result the reservoir overflowed all over the basement floor (which was finished) and the GC had to replace the carpet and several doors. He was so pissed that he told me change the GFIs to regular plugs or I was fired.
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Old 10-28-2010, 10:36 PM   #11
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Single receptacle, maybe?
I don't think that's allowed. My understanding is if its a plug in a garage it has to be GFI'd.
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Old 10-28-2010, 10:44 PM   #12
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Dennis posted a pic of a dead front GFCI. You could just mount that instead of a switch some where accesible. That would function as an override and satisfy GFCI reguirements.
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Old 10-28-2010, 10:56 PM   #13
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Speaking of GFI's causing aggravation, what do you guys typically do about condensate pumps for air furnaces in basements? Once I had a GFI trip that the pump was plugged into, the high water float switch on the pump either got stuck or was defective. As a result the reservoir overflowed all over the basement floor (which was finished) and the GC had to replace the carpet and several doors. He was so pissed that he told me change the GFIs to regular plugs or I was fired.
If that was moi I will leave it on GFCI unless the AJH have specal permmison to do that part if the inspector say no have to be GFCI'ed then leave it and if the GC fire me on this one I will just take it with good reason I will not break the codes like that.

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Old 10-28-2010, 10:59 PM   #14
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Why not just cut to the chase and require everything to be gfci/afci protected?

Note to resi electricians:

You might want to invest in a megger.
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Old 10-28-2010, 11:01 PM   #15
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Why not just cut to the chase and require everything to be gfci/afci protected?

Note to resi electricians:

You might want to invest in a megger.

Becarefull with that part due the combo AFCI/GFCI do not have person protection level in there at all IIRC it about 30 to 75 Ma setting on GFCI side so you definely need a true GFCI devcie to take care the lower level per NEC code requirement.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 10-28-2010, 11:06 PM   #16
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Mr. French Electrician,

Are there many similarities between the 08 NEC and whatever code or codes you guys use over there? You sem to be well versed in both. A brief answer would suffice. I do realize that this could be a long reply but no nedd just asking a general question out of curiousity.
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Old 10-28-2010, 11:10 PM   #17
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Mr. French Electrician,

Are there many similarities between the 08 NEC and whatever code or codes you guys use over there? You sem to be well versed in both. A brief answer would suffice. I do realize that this could be a long reply but no nedd just asking a general question out of curiousity.

In few parts of EFC { French Electrical Code } it is parallel with 08 NEC code I know in Kitchen area is simaur beside the range { cooker } it required a local disconnect switch if 3 phase or more than 32 amp or both.

But few other parts no it is not the same like motor contol panel it more stricter than NEC and few other parts.

Oh yeah one part is we requred a netural conductor in the switch boxes { it was in effect 1.5 year ago }

Merci.
Marc
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Old 10-28-2010, 11:12 PM   #18
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Becarefull with that part due the combo AFCI/GFCI do not have person protection level in there at all IIRC it about 30 to 75 Ma setting on GFCI side so you definely need a true GFCI devcie to take care the lower level per NEC code requirement.

Merci,
Marc
Yeah. I wasn't referring to the combo devices, Marc.
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Old 10-28-2010, 11:14 PM   #19
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Oh yeah one part is we requred a netural conductor in the switch boxes { it was in effect 1.5 year ago }

Merci.
Marc[/quote]

That makes entirely too much sense for us here.
How often have i gone to add a device and wished that that damn switch box had a noodle in it!!!!

I think every electrican has wished that!
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Old 10-28-2010, 11:16 PM   #20
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Yeah. I wasn't referring to the combo devices, Marc.

Fair engough.,,

AFAIK most states will required every thing on 120 volts in the garage have to be GFCI unless overridden by local codes.

I know in State of Wisconsin do not have any extemps on this one beside the Frezzer { most inspectors got smart with this }

Merci.
Marc

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