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Old 12-02-2016, 10:53 PM   #21
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I take a walk and find the best elevation that will avoid as many obstacles as possible, keep my bends to a minimum. The more boxes you have, the more time and material you're using. Box, 2x connectors, mounting, 2x support, splices, box cover. It's time and material that can possibly be avoided with a little forethought. It's also another point for problems.
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Old 12-02-2016, 11:53 PM   #22
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Great. Now let me tell you about the commercial ceiling where there was exactly 7/8'' clearance between the top of the t-bar and the bottom of the concrete stress support beams for the upstairs floor..... And minimum 3/4'' emt spec.

I got it done though............
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Old 12-03-2016, 02:20 AM   #23
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Mike did you cut the t-bar runners .
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Old 12-03-2016, 09:28 AM   #24
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Did a McDonalds years ago and they had it measured to where your piperack went on the drawings.. Not the all the pipe sizes, but a block was reserved for electrical... Well we missed that block by about 6" in one area and found out why afterwards.. Lights wouldn't fit, mechanical had to manuver around us.. After that, I paid close attention to any notes on drawings...

Had another guy "assume" that the structural steel in a building must have been for electrical instead of measuring.. One afternoon, after had most of the cable tray installed, the mechanical superintendent came up to me and asked when we were moving our stuff.. As this other guy was on days off, I went out and checked.. We were at the wrong elevation.. Tore everything down, brought in a welder and spent the next 2 days getting everything back to where it was when he left.. He got back and I handed him a tape measure and said he might wanna start using it.....
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Old 12-03-2016, 10:32 AM   #25
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Mike did you cut the t-bar runners .
Nope. 3/4'' conduit slipped in barely. I have no idea how they got the tiles to go in but they did it. Glad I wasn't around to hear the bitching .
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Old 12-14-2016, 05:57 PM   #26
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I'm rarely the first to run in an area, so I usually try to match existing unless it's fecal quality work. Which it usually is in a remodel. If it's new work and I get the chance, I'll pore over other trades prints, elevations, RCP and come up with a grand plan. Usually though I get to it late and squeeze it in wherever I can. I will say, though, a pox upon those who run conduit horizontally within 2 feet of ceiling grid if they have any alternative.
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Old 01-20-2017, 07:00 PM   #27
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So how do you guys figure out your route for conduit?
The path of least resistance.
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Old 01-21-2017, 12:35 AM   #28
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The path of least resistance.
I've heard that a time or two!
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Old 01-21-2017, 11:32 PM   #29
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if your having trouble visualizing the best route, take a slow patient look at the environment and then run a string down the route you think is best. this will show you obstacles and problems that you may not have noticed.
Or slap a cheap laser pointer onto your torpedo level's v-groove
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Old 03-20-2017, 12:47 AM   #30
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If you can price it in, use strut/cobras for the vertical runs. (This lets you kick under across.) Cut the U- strut 40% wider than what you need. That way you always hit strong anchor points and give yourself more options for conduit alignment. In the end it looks better, like a bold assembly rather than a measly little run. with that as your base you can ensure that all your future runs will fit and allow minimal use of transitions and saddles.

Every time I go in to some old shop, there is always some offset 90 blocking all the KO's in the box I have to get pipe to. Don't cheap out on walls. Customers/Bosses can appreciate good workmanship. It doesn't take all day to do if you build the routine.
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Old 03-20-2017, 11:45 PM   #31
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This is one of the things I hated when I was an apprentice.

I had the technical/mechanical ability to do the job, but the "etiquette" is what I lacked due to inexperience. Just like you said, I could bend the hell out of pipe, but figuring out which way the foreman is going to prefer is what got me stressed out.

This is simply something that you will pick up as time goes on. The more you see the more you will know and the more confident you will become.

As for your specific question, it's hard to say thru a forum without seeing the job. You essentially want a straight run that will be out of the way of other trades and will leave access to things that need it.
This.
You just have to feel out who you're working for. I've worked for guys who meticulously sized their pipe so they could run (for example) 1 1/4" down a hall to an 8x8, drop off circuits to a few rooms, run 1'' to the next 8x8, drop off ccts, etc., and I've worked for guys on the opposite end who run seperate 3/4'' to every freakin' room from the panel and it looks like a wall of steel above the panel. Just ask your boss how he wants it run and if he gives your flack for asking, do what you feel is best and feel free to throw it in his face if he doesn't like what you're doing.
Left to my own devices (I mostly did offices so lots of halls and small rooms), I prefer to start large to feed an area and shrink my pipe as necessary as I go.
Mounting strut/rod anchors to q deck before the floor above you gets poured is a huge timesaver too.
And while the tinbashers will almost always **** us over at some point in the job, buy yourself a pad of tracing paper. Take pieces and lay them over their prints and plan your pipe run accordingly to stay away from their stuff. Then take the pieces back to your prints so you can see clearly where you have ran stuff but haven't marked your prints all to hell.
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Old 03-21-2017, 02:51 AM   #32
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This.
You just have to feel out who you're working for. I've worked for guys who meticulously sized their pipe so they could run (for example) 1 1/4" down a hall to an 8x8, drop off circuits to a few rooms, run 1'' to the next 8x8, drop off ccts, etc., and I've worked for guys on the opposite end who run seperate 3/4'' to every freakin' room from the panel and it looks like a wall of steel above the panel. Just ask your boss how he wants it run and if he gives your flack for asking, do what you feel is best and feel free to throw it in his face if he doesn't like what you're doing.
Left to my own devices (I mostly did offices so lots of halls and small rooms), I prefer to start large to feed an area and shrink my pipe as necessary as I go.
Mounting strut/rod anchors to q deck before the floor above you gets poured is a huge timesaver too.
And while the tinbashers will almost always **** us over at some point in the job, buy yourself a pad of tracing paper. Take pieces and lay them over their prints and plan your pipe run accordingly to stay away from their stuff. Then take the pieces back to your prints so you can see clearly where you have ran stuff but haven't marked your prints all to hell.


And did you derate all the conductors in those large pipes? I'd rather run a 3/4 to every room and pull 12s


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Old 03-21-2017, 04:16 AM   #33
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And did you derate all the conductors in those large pipes? I'd rather run a 3/4 to every room and pull 12s


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Balancing out... it's better to home run #10s...

This DRASTICALLY cuts down on your piping effort.

C.f. the rules for de-rating.
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Old 03-21-2017, 11:53 AM   #34
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Depends also on location. Exposed or hidden? I had to tell a guy recently to forget all the commercial habits he's developed. All the eyeballing and "close enough" wasn't cutting it in an exposed, eye level install.

On the flipside, this past summer I was running conduit in a ceiling of a high security building that was very difficult to remove and reinstall. Every piece had to go back in a particular order and could take up to 40 minutes depending on how much we took down. I opted for rigid because supporting was going to be very difficult even though I could have run emt. We only opened the ceiling where was necessary and I can tell you there was almost no regard for aesthetics.

As far as finding paths, try to get eye level, sometimes pathways that look great from the ground have a lot of obstacles, like those triangle purlin braces that don't always line up just right. Could be the difference of running above, or below the purlin. Above may be easier, faster, but hung below might look nicer and easier to match if there will be additional conduits.
Heck, I didn't know that you don't have to strap rigid. I will have to put that one in the memory bank.
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Old 03-21-2017, 11:55 AM   #35
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And did you derate all the conductors in those large pipes? I'd rather run a 3/4 to every room and pull 12s


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1 1/4" in a straight run would required a 10X10 wouldn't it?
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Old 03-21-2017, 06:33 PM   #36
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And did you derate all the conductors in those large pipes? I'd rather run a 3/4 to every room and pull 12s


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Balancing out... it's better to home run #10s...

This DRASTICALLY cuts down on your piping effort.

C.f. the rules for de-rating.
OP,
Case and point on preference. If someone else is in charge just ask and do it their way.
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Old 03-21-2017, 09:34 PM   #37
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Heck, I didn't know that you don't have to strap rigid. I will have to put that one in the memory bank.
344.30(B)(4): Horizontal runs of RMC supported by openings through framing members at intervals not exceeding 10 ft, and securely fastened within 3 ft of termination points shall be permitted.

This is precisely what I ended up doing in that ceiling because of the circumstances. We still secured the conduit where we had access or near bends, but it made an already tough install easier not having to worry about securing exactly every 10 feet.
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Old 03-21-2017, 10:36 PM   #38
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344.30(B)(4): Horizontal runs of RMC supported by openings through framing members at intervals not exceeding 10 ft, and securely fastened within 3 ft of termination points shall be permitted.

This is precisely what I ended up doing in that ceiling because of the circumstances. We still secured the conduit where we had access or near bends, but it made an already tough install easier not having to worry about securing exactly every 10 feet.
Humm, I wonder what the EMT strapping codes are?
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Old 04-05-2017, 11:40 PM   #39
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As few bends as possible. Avoid the fancy stuff. If there are going to be other conduits in the same area, keep that in mind too. You have to the big picture or you'll end up screwing yourself or the next guy.
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Old 04-06-2017, 12:59 PM   #40
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Humm, I wonder what the EMT strapping codes are?
Even if there is identical exceptions for EMT (don't have the book in front of me right now) I wouldn't have used it because they are weaker at the coupling and we would've needed to be within arms reach to tighten each coupling and strap which was challenging for that project. We switched to EMT as soon as we got away from that ridiculous ceiling.
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