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Old 08-19-2012, 06:46 PM   #1
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Default Books for Beginner Apprentice

Hi, I am completely new to the electrical trade. I just finished high school and I luckily know someone who owns an Electrical company and has hired me as an apprentice.

I want to start to read and learn about the trade a bit before I start working,
but I have no idea what the best book(s) are to get.

I heard the National Electrical Code is good but I'm not sure what one as I found many online.

Here is what I was going to purchase: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0877659168

Is this a good one to get?

If not let me know what one is best and if possible a link to where I can buy it.

Thanks!

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Old 08-19-2012, 06:53 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kkjs View Post
Hi, I am completely new to the electrical trade. I just finished high school and I luckily know someone who owns an Electrical company and has hired me as an apprentice.

I want to start to read and learn about the trade a bit before I start working,
but I have no idea what the best book(s) are to get.

I heard the National Electrical Code is good but I'm not sure what one as I found many online.

Here is what I was going to purchase: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0877659168

Is this a good one to get?

If not let me know what one is best and if possible a link to where I can buy it.

Thanks!
Yes it is there are many others as well,welcome to ET.

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Old 08-19-2012, 06:53 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kkjs View Post

I heard the National Electrical Code is good but I'm not sure what one as I found many online.


Thanks!
Sure if you want to know how the country to the south of us does stuff. What you are thinking of is the canadian electrical code. http://shop.csa.ca/en/canada/landing...tm_language=en

There pricey ($175) on there website.

Starting in the trade you don't need a code book, if you can get your hands on an used one it would give you a start. If your doing something at work, like installing EMT, go home at the end of the day and read the rules on EMT. Then you know why and why we don't do stuff a certain way.
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Old 08-19-2012, 06:56 PM   #4
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Sure if you want to know how the country to the south of us does stuff. What you are thinking of is the canadian electrical code. http://shop.csa.ca/en/canada/landing...tm_language=en

There pricey ($175) on there website.

Starting in the trade you don't need a code book, if you can get your hands on an used one it would give you a start. If your doing something at work, like installing EMT, go home at the end of the day and read the rules on EMT. Then you know why and why we don't do stuff a certain way.
thanks for letting me know! atleast I did not buy it yet

And I do realize I dont absolutely need a code book but I was just looking for any good book for a beginner electrician to just give me a bit of the basics.

thanks
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Old 08-19-2012, 07:12 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kkjs View Post
Hi, I am completely new to the electrical trade. I just finished high school and I luckily know someone who owns an Electrical company and has hired me as an apprentice.

I want to start to read and learn about the trade a bit before I start working,
but I have no idea what the best book(s) are to get.

I heard the National Electrical Code is good but I'm not sure what one as I found many online.

Here is what I was going to purchase: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0877659168

Is this a good one to get?

If not let me know what one is best and if possible a link to where I can buy it.

Thanks!
Here are a couple of more..

http://www.mhprofessional.com/produc...sbn=0071494626


http://www.contractorresource.com/so...FUJx4Aodbj0ATA

Start Reading....///
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Old 08-19-2012, 07:14 PM   #6
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is the American Electricians Handbook a good read even if I am working in Canada?
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Old 08-19-2012, 07:19 PM   #7
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is the American Electricians Handbook a good read even if I am working in Canada?
Well I would say yes because most of it is Electrical theory and practical as well the voltages you guy use is different But the Canadian guys will know better than I.
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Old 08-19-2012, 07:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darren79 View Post
Sure if you want to know how the country to the south of us does stuff. What you are thinking of is the canadian electrical code. http://shop.csa.ca/en/canada/landing...tm_language=en

There pricey ($175) on there website.

Starting in the trade you don't need a code book, if you can get your hands on an used one it would give you a start. If your doing something at work, like installing EMT, go home at the end of the day and read the rules on EMT. Then you know why and why we don't do stuff a certain way.


Welcome, I applaud your enthusiasm.

Read up on construction safety or toolbox talk sheets - drills, ladders, PPE. I would rather have you understand basic safety and how to handle yourself on the job so that you and specially me don't get hurt.
Here's one from Ontario for you http://www.ibew353.org/health/BlueBook.pdf

If you are totally green, your boss will not expect you really know very much. He will expect you to listen, ask questions, learn and understand.
There are many books, videos etc to show techniques for bending pipe, running circuits. Once you know what type of projects you will be working on, you can research these.
The code book will help you understand why we do things a certain way, but it doesn't tell you the mechanics of how to mount boxes, or bend pipe. That you learn by practice. That is the reason the apprenticeship takes 4 to 5 years ( 8000 to 10000 hours). One could spend a year in school, pass all the exams and not know a single thing about using a tester or bender

Last edited by wcord; 08-19-2012 at 08:37 PM.
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Old 08-19-2012, 08:15 PM   #9
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You might like Applications of Electrical Construction, by Clidero and Sharpe. It talks about a lot of basic stuff that you are going to need to know. Wiring, boxes, switches, lighting etc.

Another good one for a beginner might be Electrical Wiring: Residential(there is also a Commercial one and an Industrial one). I have the 5th edition as required by my trade school and some of the authors are my trade school instructors.

Also, if you're interested, I have a 2009 Ontario Electrical Safety Code book, which I no longer need because I bought a 2012 CEC. I'll sell it to you for cheap if you want. The '09 OESC is about 98% the same, and since you're just getting started, that'll be plenty. The Code doesn't tell you how to get anything done. It only tells you the minimum standard at which things must get done. It assumes you already know how to do those things and is written in legalese, so the main benefit of having one, for you, is going to be familiarising yourself with how to use it and how to find the information you want in it.
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Old 08-19-2012, 08:25 PM   #10
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I assume you already know basic electrical theory. If not "Del Mars Standard Textbook of Electricity" is a good start.
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Old 08-19-2012, 09:13 PM   #11
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A lot of electrical work is like carpentry. You pull wire, you drill holes, screw things to walls, nail things down, etc. I wouldn't worry too much about theory, except that the black and the red are hot, and the white completes the circuit, and it's called the neutral (or identified conductor if your journeyman is picky about terms).
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Old 08-19-2012, 09:25 PM   #12
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As important as it is to know what books to read....





......it is equally as important to know what books to avoid.







Do not buy this:

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