Minimum 2-pole circuit breaker required? - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:01 PM   #1
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Default Minimum 2-pole circuit breaker required?

Hey guys, as usual you're always fast to respond and always expanding my knowledge in the trade but I came upon a question in my ESAT that's left me stumped. I even talked it over with my journeyman and he was in the same boat as myself so now I'm seeking the knowledge of the elders:P

My code question goes as follows:

An electrical installation is being planned for a room in a commercial occupancy. The room is to contain the following: Wall switch to switch ten 120V, 4ft, 2-lamp fluorescent fixtures; Three 5-15R split circuit receptacles; One 240V, 3000W baseboard heater controlled by a wall thermostat; One 4500/1500W, 240V electric hot water heater One 6-15R receptacle. What is the minimum number of 2-pole circuit breakers that would be required?
a) 2
b) 3
c) 4
d) 5

I selected d) 5 because of the 3 split receptacles, the 240V baseboard heater and the 240V hot water heater. Now i know the 240V baseboard heater can be hooked up to a single pole thermostat but isn't it still required to come off a 2 pole breaker. Any help would be appreciated because i hate not knowing

The ESAT answer was c) 4
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:09 PM   #2
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Perhaps the 3 split receptacles and lighting are on the same breaker?
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:16 PM   #3
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I would have said 3, don't see what the 4th one is for.
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:37 PM   #4
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3? Please explain
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:43 PM   #5
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I'm guessing the split recs are all on one circuit. Only way I can come up with 4


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Old 02-16-2017, 10:48 PM   #6
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Quote:
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3? Please explain
1. Baseboard Heater

2. Water heater

3. 240v 15amp receptacle (6-15R)
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:49 PM   #7
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I'm guessing the split recs are all on one circuit. Only way I can come up with 4


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Maybe but odd.
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:52 PM   #8
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I'm thinking that the 3 split receptacles only took up 2 breakers ...Ie: 3 top recepts on one leg, and 3 bottom on the other leg...
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:52 PM   #9
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One for the 6-15R receptacle. 250 volt 15 amp
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:53 PM   #10
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how can you put 3 split receptacles on one circuit, way i see that is 2 choices:

Phase A, Phase B, Phase C, neutral tied together 3-pole breaker
Phase A, Phase B, Phase C, neutral tied together 3-pole breaker

Phase A, Phase B, neutral tied together 2-pole breaker (1 split receptacle)
Phase C, Phase A, neutral tied together 2-pole breaker (1 split receptacle)
Phase B, Phase C, neutral tied together 2-pole breaker (1 split receptacle)
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:53 PM   #11
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1 split plugs
2 baseboard heat
3 hot water tank
4 6-15R receptacle
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:56 PM   #12
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Quote:
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One for the 6-15R receptacle. 250 volt 15 amp

You're correct..over looked the "commercial"
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:57 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben franklin View Post
I'm thinking that the 3 split receptacles only took up 2 breakers ...Ie: 3 top recepts on one leg, and 3 bottom on the other leg...
You ever wire like that?
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Old 02-16-2017, 10:57 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddy current View Post
1 split plugs
2 baseboard heat
3 hot water tank
4 6-15R receptacle
i overlooked the 6-15R, not really used to seeing that but can you please explain how you get using (1) 2-pole breaker for 3 split receptacles?
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Old 02-16-2017, 11:00 PM   #15
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just saw the above post cause i was gonna say one hot for the top 3 brass, and the other hot for the bottom 3 brass but who the hell wires like that????
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Old 02-16-2017, 11:01 PM   #16
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three split receptacles in total,only 2 splits per circuit that would be 2 double breakers. one double breaker for the baseboard heater and one more double breaker for the water heater equals 4 altogether.
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Old 02-16-2017, 11:01 PM   #17
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Five is the answer I think.

1 for the 6-15R receptacle
1 for the heater
1 for the HWT
2 for the splits - the third split can feed off the first or second split.

Now you could put the HWT on a single pole (4500 watts is (240 volts) two pole, 1500 watts is (120 volts) single pole?) so that could bring you back to four I suspect. You also probably could say the same for the BB heater, I suspect it would be dual voltage rated, but there was only one wattage rating in the question.

I think in the "real world" most of us would have used 6 - 2 pole breakers.

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Old 02-16-2017, 11:03 PM   #18
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well i guess that solves my question but seriously if i saw that in an installation i'd be like wtf, thanks for all the brain storming guys ^.^
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Old 02-16-2017, 11:04 PM   #19
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Two splits per circuit is in residential only.
26-722(b)(i)
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Old 02-16-2017, 11:06 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddy current View Post
Two splits per circuit is in residential only.
so does that mean you'd have one 2 pole breaker for the first 2 split receptacles and a second 2 pole breaker for the last split receptacle?
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