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Old 04-08-2013, 08:51 PM   #1
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Default Smoke Detectors in Bedrooms

It looks like the Sask inspectors will be enforcing smoke detectors in bedrooms. (Section 32 in the Sask. interpretations.) It's in the building code but I'm not sure if it shows up in the CEC.

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Old 04-08-2013, 09:33 PM   #2
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Its now required here in BC, part of the new BC Building Code. Smokies required in all bedrooms in ADDITION to those detectors that were required before.

So pretty much in a decent size house a circuit might have 11 smokies and the 1 light required to be part of that circuit.

I dont know if this is a new code but I had to add smokies to a house I just did. The building inspector wanted ionization and photoelectric type smokies because the fire seperation between the secondary and primary suite was 30 mins. If the fire sepeation is 45 min then only one type of detector is required.

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Old 04-08-2013, 11:11 PM   #3
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How soon do you figure this will become widely enforced?
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:15 PM   #4
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It's already enforced here in Kansas. Mainly in Newton and Roseville area
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:22 PM   #5
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It's already enforced here in Kansas. Mainly in Newton and Roseville area
I'll keep that in mind when I go to Kansas.

I assume they already enforce it because the effective date of the amendment is December 1, 2012. I'm not sure how it would look on a defect notice without a code reference. I went back to a job today and added a couple smokes. Fortunately I don't do a lot of residential so my exposure is small.
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Old 04-09-2013, 12:17 AM   #6
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I am told by a Sask building inspector that these will be required when they finish adopting the 2010 building code likey in May, until then we donnot need to put them in every bedroom. Does not hurt to talk to a local building inspector to stay on top of when he will be enforcing this in your area.
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Old 04-09-2013, 12:41 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by xlink View Post
It looks like the Sask inspectors will be enforcing smoke detectors in bedrooms. (Section 32 in the Sask. interpretations.) It's in the building code but I'm not sure if it shows up in the CEC.
Canadians, such copycats
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:44 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by sparky250
So pretty much in a decent size house a circuit might have 11 smokies and the 1 light required to be part of that circuit.
Smoke detectors have been going into all bedrooms in Manitoba for a year or two and must be battery back up but when wiring we never count this as an outlet in the circuit for the reason that you can only have 12 outlets on a circuit and these smoke detectors draw next to nothing. I might count all smoke detectors, combination units, and heat detectors as one throughout a house with twenty devices.
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:15 AM   #9
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It's already enforced here in Kansas. Mainly in Newton and Roseville area
I guess you don't use ionized detectors????
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:28 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Kunolop

Smoke detectors have been going into all bedrooms in Manitoba for a year or two and must be battery back up but when wiring we never count this as an outlet in the circuit for the reason that you can only have 12 outlets on a circuit and these smoke detectors draw next to nothing. I might count all smoke detectors, combination units, and heat detectors as one throughout a house with twenty devices.
What inspector tells you not to count an outlet?
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Old 04-09-2013, 09:16 AM   #11
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Canadians, such copycats
Forced compliance to eliminate competitive advantage under NAFTA? Actually it's a push by manufacturers to sell more smoke detectors. Manufacturers have money and CSA responds favourably to "donations." See? We aren't so different, eh?
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:27 PM   #12
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Wtf?

First I've heard of this. So INSIDE every bedroom and just outside every bedroom?

This makes no sense.
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Old 04-09-2013, 02:14 PM   #13
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Wtf?

First I've heard of this. So INSIDE every bedroom and just outside every bedroom?

This makes no sense.
Codes stopped making sense 10 years ago. Now shut up and consume.
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Old 04-09-2013, 03:10 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wpgshocker

What inspector tells you not to count an outlet?
8-304 (1) states you cannot have more than 12 outlets on a two wire circuit

8-304 (2) states that these outlets should not be considered less than one amp each except by sub 3

8-304 (3) state that if you know the load is less than 1 A you can use that to calculate how many outlets on one two wire circuit.

Therefor if I know that the devices draw 0.04a I can add them all up and then connect the same circuit to other outlets from there using the connected load if know or a minimum of 1 a for each outlet up to a maximum of 80% of the breaker value.
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Old 04-09-2013, 04:27 PM   #15
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We have to in Nova Scotia!
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Old 04-09-2013, 05:29 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by sparky250 View Post
Its now required here in BC, part of the new BC Building Code. Smokies required in all bedrooms in ADDITION to those detectors that were required before.

So pretty much in a decent size house a circuit might have 11 smokies and the 1 light required to be part of that circuit.
What kind of light?
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Old 04-09-2013, 06:35 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kunolop

8-304 (1) states you cannot have more than 12 outlets on a two wire circuit

8-304 (2) states that these outlets should not be considered less than one amp each except by sub 3

8-304 (3) state that if you know the load is less than 1 A you can use that to calculate how many outlets on one two wire circuit.

Therefor if I know that the devices draw 0.04a I can add them all up and then connect the same circuit to other outlets from there using the connected load if know or a minimum of 1 a for each outlet up to a maximum of 80% of the breaker value.
I agree you know the connected load of the smokes, but what about the other outlets? You have no idea what the connected load is. How you can load up past 12 if you don't meet the requirements of the rule, unless you have special permission?

Unless I misread and you are not mixing your devices with lights/plugs. A dedicated circuit for life safety devices, for sure, load it up.

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Old 04-09-2013, 06:40 PM   #18
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I agree you know the connected load of the smokes, but what about the other outlets? You have no idea what the connected load is. How you can load up past 12 if you don't meet the requirements of the rule, unless you have special permission?
You are right! You must have one light and one plug on the circuit, so only 10 smoke detectors. That means you are not allowed to build a house that requires more than 10 smoke detectors. So, what is the maximum size house we are allowed to build in Canada?
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:06 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wpgshocker

I agree you know the connected load of the smokes, but what about the other outlets? You have no idea what the connected load is. How you can load up past 12 if you don't meet the requirements of the rule, unless you have special permission?

Unless I misread and you are not mixing your devices with lights/plugs. A dedicated circuit for life safety devices, for sure, load it up.
Ok I agree one circuit should be used, marked, and have a breaker lock on it like commercial but that would be more wrong in the eye of the code book. Take for instance your devices draw 0.05 of an amp and you have 10 devices for a total of 0.5 amps for your smokes, now legally by code you can put up to 11 more outlets (not knowing what they will draw, lights and plugs) on that code with no special permission needed for a total of 12 outlets on that one circuit. Catch my drift? You use all three rules, instead of just applying the one you keep going back to.
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:24 PM   #20
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8-304 (3) state that if you know the load is less than 1 A you can use that to calculate how many outlets on one two wire circuit.

That's not what the code rule says
8-304(3)Where the connected load is known, the number of outlets shall be permitted to exceed 12, provided that the load current does not exceed 80% of the rating of the overcurrent device protecting the circuit.

Guess you could put one light on the cct and use the largest bulb possible for the fixture as your connected load.

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