Solar Cost- Residential - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum > Electrical Trade Topics > Alternative Energy Forum


Like Tree11Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-14-2016, 04:28 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
360max's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: NY
Posts: 9,381
Rewards Points: 514
Default Solar Cost- Residential

what the rough cost, broken down for mat/labor, for a 2000 sf home?
360max is online now   Reply With Quote
Join Contractor Talk

Join the #1 Electrician Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

ElectricianTalk.com - Are you a Professional Electrical Contractor? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's the leading place for electricians to meet online. No homeowners asking DIY questions. Just fellow tradesmen who enjoy talking about their business, their trade, and anything else that comes up. No matter what your specialty is you'll find that ElectricianTalk.com is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free!

Join ElectricianTalk.com - Click Here JOIN FOR FREE


Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ElectricianTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-14-2016, 06:26 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
cabletie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: N.J.
Posts: 1,025
Rewards Points: 34
Default

I paid 11,300 for a 5,000 watt system on my 1800 SF home. That is material only. If I had a ranch, I would have a bigger system. My system covers 60% of my electric annually.

About a third of that was paid for by incentives. The rest paid for itself in five years.
AllWIRES and PlugsAndLights like this.

Last edited by cabletie; 04-14-2016 at 06:29 AM.
cabletie is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to cabletie For This Useful Post:
360max (04-14-2016), splatz (04-14-2016)
Old 04-14-2016, 07:39 AM   #3
motherplucker
 
chicken steve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: the Green Mountain state
Posts: 33,339
Rewards Points: 2,034
Default

We're doing a 4000sq ft home on a mountain , $50K for poco power run 1/4 mile, 30K for solar

~CS~
chicken steve is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to chicken steve For This Useful Post:
360max (04-14-2016)
Old 04-14-2016, 08:09 AM   #4
Lep
THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
 
Lep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Angel Island Ca
Posts: 3,412
Rewards Points: 2,927
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cabletie View Post
I paid 11,300 for a 5,000 watt system on my 1800 SF home. That is material only. If I had a ranch, I would have a bigger system. My system covers 60% of my electric annually.

About a third of that was paid for by incentives. The rest paid for itself in five years.
How many man-hours were in that installation do you think? One or two story home?
__________________
"See the ball; Hit the ball."
Pete Rose:Joe Morgan
Lep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2016, 09:29 AM   #5
Small Potatoes
 
flyboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: North East USA
Posts: 2,587
Rewards Points: 152
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chicken steve View Post
We're doing a 4000sq ft home on a mountain , $50K for poco power run 1/4 mile, 30K for solar

~CS~
You doing the solar Steve? What does the 30K cover? Whole Solar job or just material? How many KW?
flyboy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2016, 12:12 PM   #6
NRA Member
 
backstay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wonderful Northern Minnesota
Posts: 10,785
Rewards Points: 520
Default

Size of the house has no impact on solar system sizing other than available roof area. I charge $5/watt for grid tie and $10/watt for off grid. Price of M&L is about 50% Off grid parts are a little higher. These numbers are approximately.
360max likes this.
__________________
Science Czar of Planet Earth, and Ambassador to the Planet Macmikeman
You cannot conquer a free man, the most you can do is kill him.
backstay is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to backstay For This Useful Post:
360max (04-14-2016), theJcK (04-15-2016)
Old 04-14-2016, 01:23 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
cabletie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: N.J.
Posts: 1,025
Rewards Points: 34
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lep View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabletie View Post
I paid 11,300 for a 5,000 watt system on my 1800 SF home. That is material only. If I had a ranch, I would have a bigger system. My system covers 60% of my electric annually.

About a third of that was paid for by incentives. The rest paid for itself in five years.
How many man-hours were in that installation do you think? One or two story home?
Two story home. About 46 total manhours. Two six hour days with two co-workers and myself (Sat. and Sun. In the middle of August). That was to do the racking and set the panels. Probably 10 hours alone to layout the roof with a chalk line the night before, and install the inverter, SREC meter, utility disconnect and electric panel tie in.

That time does not include all the paperwork and shade analysis. I also had to draw a section view of the roof and get it stamped by a Craig's list architect. That was $300. The town would not accept my drawing unless it was stamped by an A&E.

I used Sharp panels and their racking system. I could have screwed their strut feet right to the roof. But I got their roof flange kit also. That took more time to cut the Timberline roof shingles, and slip in the flanges. I think there is 24 of them. The system sits up another 3" and supposedly gets 5% more output, because it has the airflow underneath.

I like the Sharp system. It sits tight together with an 1/8" gap between the panels. It looks clean, and has enough room for expansion from the heat.
donaldelectrician likes this.

Last edited by cabletie; 04-14-2016 at 01:25 PM.
cabletie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2016, 03:07 PM   #8
NRA Member
 
backstay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wonderful Northern Minnesota
Posts: 10,785
Rewards Points: 520
Default

These are REC panels and SnapNRack rails. Flashed L foot attachment.
Attached Thumbnails
Solar Cost- Residential-image.jpg  

__________________
Science Czar of Planet Earth, and Ambassador to the Planet Macmikeman
You cannot conquer a free man, the most you can do is kill him.
backstay is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to backstay For This Useful Post:
360max (04-14-2016)
Old 04-14-2016, 05:47 PM   #9
Lep
THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
 
Lep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Angel Island Ca
Posts: 3,412
Rewards Points: 2,927
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cabletie View Post
Two story home. About 46 total manhours. Two six hour days with two co-workers and myself (Sat. and Sun. In the middle of August). That was to do the racking and set the panels. Probably 10 hours alone to layout the roof with a chalk line the night before, and install the inverter, SREC meter, utility disconnect and electric panel tie in.

That time does not include all the paperwork and shade analysis. I also had to draw a section view of the roof and get it stamped by a Craig's list architect. That was $300. The town would not accept my drawing unless it was stamped by an A&E.

I used Sharp panels and their racking system. I could have screwed their strut feet right to the roof. But I got their roof flange kit also. That took more time to cut the Timberline roof shingles, and slip in the flanges. I think there is 24 of them. The system sits up another 3" and supposedly gets 5% more output, because it has the airflow underneath.

I like the Sharp system. It sits tight together with an 1/8" gap between the panels. It looks clean, and has enough room for expansion from the heat.

I have two systems to estimate. Both two-story tile roof about 5000 6000 watt. so I'm thinking maybe 50 hours total man hours ea. plus permits and drawings.
__________________
"See the ball; Hit the ball."
Pete Rose:Joe Morgan
Lep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2016, 05:50 PM   #10
Lep
THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
 
Lep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Angel Island Ca
Posts: 3,412
Rewards Points: 2,927
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cabletie View Post
I paid 11,300 for a 5,000 watt system on my 1800 SF home. That is material only. If I had a ranch, I would have a bigger system. My system covers 60% of my electric annually.

About a third of that was paid for by incentives. The rest paid for itself in five years.
What was your total material cost?Not including any tax credit or anything.
__________________
"See the ball; Hit the ball."
Pete Rose:Joe Morgan
Lep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2016, 06:39 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
cabletie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: N.J.
Posts: 1,025
Rewards Points: 34
Default

11,300 was the cost for the panels, rack, meter pan w/meter (for SREC credits in NJ) and Sunny Boy inverter w/DC disconnect. I don't remember the permit cost. The architects stamp was $300. Not sure what the rest of the materials came to.

3- 2x4x8 studs
1- 4'x4'x3/4" plywood
1- 1" roof flange
1- 1" Lb
1- 1"x12" nipple
1- 6x6x6 Nema 1 pull box (in attic under LB and top center solar panel)
30'- 3/4" EMT
5- 3/4" one hole straps
2- 3/4" set screw connectors
4- 3/4" set screw couplings
160'- #8 THHN (two strings of 12 panels)
2- 50' PV wire with MC4 ends molded on (cut in the middle to feed the strings from the JB in attic.
70'- #6 solid green THHN
20'- #10-3 romex
4- flower pots (kidding...big blue wirenuts)
1- 30A. 300V. single phase pullout disconnect
1- 25A. 2 pole Square D QO breaker

At the time an array disconnect was not required. I had a spare 3/4" EMT from my attic to the basement. I used that to get from the roof to the basement, and mounted the inverter in the basement, out of the sun. I have never heard the cooling fans turn on yet, only once when I tested them by moving the jumper on the PC board.

This is a picture of the rack with the LB through the roof flange. The roof is a 6 on 12. Doing a tile roof must be a pain in the ass.

Solar Cost- Residential-solar-mounting-rack.jpg
360max and nom-board like this.

Last edited by cabletie; 04-14-2016 at 06:46 PM.
cabletie is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to cabletie For This Useful Post:
360max (04-14-2016)
Old 04-14-2016, 06:50 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
cabletie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: N.J.
Posts: 1,025
Rewards Points: 34
Default

Forgot to say good luck. I know you have been pursuing solar for a while now.
cabletie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2016, 06:51 PM   #13
Lep
THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
 
Lep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Angel Island Ca
Posts: 3,412
Rewards Points: 2,927
Default

I'm figuring $4,500 labor a two-story tile roof 6kw will be my estimate.
__________________
"See the ball; Hit the ball."
Pete Rose:Joe Morgan
Lep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2016, 07:29 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
cabletie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: N.J.
Posts: 1,025
Rewards Points: 34
Default

Isn't that kind of low?

Like Backstay said labor is around 50% of the job. Did I read him right? It seems like that is what it is around here.

Looking at Steve's system the materials would be around $15,000. That seems about right.
cabletie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2016, 09:37 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
360max's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: NY
Posts: 9,381
Rewards Points: 514
Default

how much of that cost can the homeowner get 'help' with (grants, credits, etc...)?
360max is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2016, 09:41 PM   #16
NRA Member
 
backstay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wonderful Northern Minnesota
Posts: 10,785
Rewards Points: 520
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cabletie View Post
11,300 was the cost for the panels, rack, meter pan w/meter (for SREC credits in NJ) and Sunny Boy inverter w/DC disconnect. I don't remember the permit cost. The architects stamp was $300. Not sure what the rest of the materials came to.

3- 2x4x8 studs
1- 4'x4'x3/4" plywood
1- 1" roof flange
1- 1" Lb
1- 1"x12" nipple
1- 6x6x6 Nema 1 pull box (in attic under LB and top center solar panel)
30'- 3/4" EMT
5- 3/4" one hole straps
2- 3/4" set screw connectors
4- 3/4" set screw couplings
160'- #8 THHN (two strings of 12 panels)
2- 50' PV wire with MC4 ends molded on (cut in the middle to feed the strings from the JB in attic.
70'- #6 solid green THHN
20'- #10-3 romex
4- flower pots (kidding...big blue wirenuts)
1- 30A. 300V. single phase pullout disconnect
1- 25A. 2 pole Square D QO breaker

At the time an array disconnect was not required. I had a spare 3/4" EMT from my attic to the basement. I used that to get from the roof to the basement, and mounted the inverter in the basement, out of the sun. I have never heard the cooling fans turn on yet, only once when I tested them by moving the jumper on the PC board.

This is a picture of the rack with the LB through the roof flange. The roof is a 6 on 12. Doing a tile roof must be a pain in the ass.

Attachment 77330
I don't see a remote disconnect in your bill of materials.
__________________
Science Czar of Planet Earth, and Ambassador to the Planet Macmikeman
You cannot conquer a free man, the most you can do is kill him.
backstay is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2016, 09:48 PM   #17
motherplucker
 
chicken steve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: the Green Mountain state
Posts: 33,339
Rewards Points: 2,034
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyboy View Post
You doing the solar Steve? What does the 30K cover? Whole Solar job or just material? How many KW?
Nope I don't FlyBoy. ....

I'm the licensed 'spark' for a few local guru's , and to be honest i'm learning more about art 690 from them than any other source.

~CS~
donaldelectrician and 360max like this.
chicken steve is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to chicken steve For This Useful Post:
flyboy (04-15-2016)
Old 04-15-2016, 04:21 AM   #18
Lep
THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
 
Lep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Angel Island Ca
Posts: 3,412
Rewards Points: 2,927
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cabletie View Post
Isn't that kind of low?

Like Backstay said labor is around 50% of the job. Did I read him right? It seems like that is what it is around here.

Looking at Steve's system the materials would be around $15,000. That seems about right.
well that's why I asked you what your man hours was and you said around 45 or something. I figure 50 man hours and then plugged into somelabor rates
__________________
"See the ball; Hit the ball."
Pete Rose:Joe Morgan
Lep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2016, 11:29 AM   #19
NRA Member
 
backstay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wonderful Northern Minnesota
Posts: 10,785
Rewards Points: 520
Default

You said $11,300 for the "solar" part of a 5000 watt system. That's not bad. I take it you bought that from a parts company not an installer? BOS costs can vary so much you need to look at each system one on one. With rapid shut down, it can double.
__________________
Science Czar of Planet Earth, and Ambassador to the Planet Macmikeman
You cannot conquer a free man, the most you can do is kill him.
backstay is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2016, 01:26 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
cabletie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: N.J.
Posts: 1,025
Rewards Points: 34
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by backstay View Post
You said $11,300 for the "solar" part of a 5000 watt system. That's not bad. I take it you bought that from a parts company not an installer? BOS costs can vary so much you need to look at each system one on one. With rapid shut down, it can double.
I did mine seven years ago. At the time a remote disconnect was not required. Am I right in saying a remote disconnect would shut off the DC power at the array?

I do have an AC pullout disconnect next to my utility meter. That was required by the utility. My DC disconnect is in my basement, under the inverter. At the time that was allowed. My PV wires come into the house in the attic, and are run in EMT to the basement DC disconnect. EMT was required in the house. I liked that better than seeing PVC wrap around my soffit or 12" overhang on the gable side.

The array is not fused until it gets to the DC disconnect. It comes down as two seperate strings, and is combined in the DC disconnect.

I did buy my system from a non profit organization. It is a partnership between Sharp, NECA and the IBEW. Their mission is to train and educate their contractors and employees by installing solar on their homes. They helped with all the sizing, shade analysis and rebates. They even had financing available.

http://americansolarpartners.com

360max should check them out. They are out of New York. They would know all of the incentives. I think they have an office in CA also. They may have expanded more?
chicken steve and 360max like this.
cabletie is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to cabletie For This Useful Post:
360max (04-15-2016)
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Thermal Solar an Epic Bust telsa Alternative Energy Forum 16 06-15-2016 01:28 PM
Breaking into solar Anathera General Electrical Discussion 14 04-04-2016 09:29 PM
Solar interconnect issue cc2kj General Electrical Discussion 21 03-24-2016 10:06 PM
Solar and Electric AnthonyFlory NEC Code Forum 2 02-17-2016 06:53 PM
Sizing solar panels and battery bank mpetro Alternative Energy Forum 14 02-15-2016 09:55 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com