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View Poll Results: Disposal and Dishwasher on the same circuit
Yes 41 61.19%
No 26 38.81%
Voters: 67. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-20-2011, 12:43 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guschash View Post
I usually run 2-20amps circuits. I like to run #12 for all receptacle circuits, I know its over kill but there seems to be more things being plugged in these days.
Waste of money.

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Old 08-20-2011, 02:03 PM   #42
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I would say yes, if you know for sure that the dishwasher manufacturer doesn’t require their equipment to be supplied by a 15 or 20A individual branch circuit.
I guess you could be proactive and run it by the inspector beforehand, to see what he says.
Seems most resi grade disposal manufactures only care about having a switch within reach of the sink, so could probably care less about how you supply their equipment.
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Old 08-20-2011, 03:36 PM   #43
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This is what my dishwasher installation guide says:


You must have:
■ 120-volt, 60 Hz, AC-only, 15 or 20 amp fused electrical supply.
■ Copper wire only.
We recommend:
■ A time-delay fuse or circuit breaker.
■ A separate circuit.
If direct wiring dishwasher:
■ Use flexible, armored or nonmetallic sheathed, copper wire
with grounding wire that meets the wiring requirements for
your home and local codes and ordinances.
■ Use strain relief method provided with house wiring junction
box or install a UL Listed/CSA Approved clamp connector to
the house wiring junction box. If using conduit, use a
UL Listed/CSA Approved conduit connector.
If connecting dishwasher with a power supply cord:
■ Use Power Supply Cord Kit (Part Number 4317824) marked
for use with dishwashers. Kit contents include:
■ Voltex, Inc., UL Listed 16-gauge 3 wire power supply cord
with 3 prong grounded plug.
■ Neer C-500 ⁷⁄₈" strain relief.
■ 3 wire connectors.
■ Part Number 302797 grommet.
Follow the kit instructions for installing the power supply cord.
■ Power supply cord must plug into a mating three prong,
grounded outlet, located in the cabinet next to the dishwasher
opening. Outlet must meet all local codes and ordinances.
IMPORTANT: If you plan to install a garbage disposer, an
additional separate 120-volt, 60 Hz, AC-only, 15 or 20 amp fused
electrical supply is required.

link:

http://www.kitchenaid.com/flash.cmd?...uct/KUDD03DTSS
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Old 08-20-2011, 03:56 PM   #44
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It's too bad DW's are rated for 10 amps; you never have 10 amps running at one time: you got the washing motor running at one time and then the heater after (if you even use it).
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Old 08-21-2011, 01:22 AM   #45
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Does this recepticle under the sink need to be GFI? I know it used to be ok for a standard recepticle. But it seems every NEC cycle more GFI requirements are added.
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:41 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuzzKill View Post
It's too bad DW's are rated for 10 amps; you never have 10 amps running at one time: you got the washing motor running at one time and then the heater after (if you even use it).
That is incorrect on some (most) dishwashers sir.

Many use the heater while the motor is running to heat the water back up to proper temperature during wash or rinse cycles. Mine also has "Temperature Boost" to heat the water even more. (Maytag Performa Portable)

For that reason, and the fact that most manufacturer's instructions call for a dedicated circuit, I voted no.
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Last edited by mxslick; 08-21-2011 at 05:44 PM.
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Old 08-21-2011, 08:03 PM   #47
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When I was doing resi, I was taught to pull a separate 20 amp circuit for the dishwasher and disposal. I've done it that way so long, I don't think I could force myself to do it any other way.

Now, let's say you use a 3 way switch. Yes it is a violation of the listing for the switch. But then your dishwasher and disposal can't run at the same time. Works well when you forget a homerun (once), I suppose you could build a relay setup under the sink to accomplish the same thing.
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Old 08-21-2011, 08:53 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Podagrower View Post
When I was doing resi, I was taught to pull a separate 20 amp circuit for the dishwasher and disposal. I've done it that way so long, I don't think I could force myself to do it any other way.

Now, let's say you use a 3 way switch. Yes it is a violation of the listing for the switch. But then your dishwasher and disposal can't run at the same time. Works well when you forget a homerun (once), I suppose you could build a relay setup under the sink to accomplish the same thing.
Why tho? Its 16.9 amps on a 20 amp circuit for an occasional few seconds.
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Old 08-21-2011, 09:36 PM   #49
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I was taught to pull separate 20 amp circuits for the DW and GD.
In my neck of the woods here they want a disconnect for the DW under the sink.

I just wanted to add the last time I hooked up a disposal off of an existing 15 amp screw in fuse under the sink with 20 amp wire.... I had to go back because it blew the screw in 15a fuse. I went back with a 20 amp fuse and amped the circuit with my fluke rms. It drew 14.?? on start up and if I remember correctly 11 running with some food in there. So be careful. I would imagine the cheap ones have a low draw but the higher end models may draw more. I'm sorry I can't remember what size it was. All was fine after the fuse swap.
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Old 08-21-2011, 11:45 PM   #50
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Here it's one 20A circuit, half switched recep under the sink.

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Old 08-22-2011, 10:24 AM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipp View Post
Does this recepticle under the sink need to be GFI? I know it used to be ok for a standard recepticle. But it seems every NEC cycle more GFI requirements are added.
Depends on if the receptacle under the sink is in a kitchen or not. A receptacle installed under a wet bar sink for a disposal would need to be GFCI protected but a receptacle installed under a sink in a kitchen would not.

Only receptacles serving the countertop in kitchens require GFCI protection whereas all receptacles within 6' of the edge of a wet bar sink require GFCI protection.

Chris
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Old 08-22-2011, 10:27 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by mxslick View Post
That is incorrect on some (most) dishwashers sir.

Many use the heater while the motor is running to heat the water back up to proper temperature during wash or rinse cycles. Mine also has "Temperature Boost" to heat the water even more. (Maytag Performa Portable)

For that reason, and the fact that most manufacturer's instructions call for a dedicated circuit, I voted no.
If the manufacturer Recommends that the appliance be on a dedicated circuit then that is not a 110.3(B) requirement. It would only be a listing requirement if the instructions mandated or required a dedicated circuit.

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Old 08-22-2011, 04:24 PM   #53
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This is a good thread. I believe that the single 20A circuit is legal and will suffice based on the articles cited so far, so long as the mfg doesn't require any dedicated circuits.
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Old 08-23-2011, 05:50 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by electures
1/3 HP Disposal, 6.8 amps, 120V
Dishwasher 9.9 amps, 120V

Are they permitted on the same 20 amp circuit. I will reserve my thoughts for later.

PLEASE VOTE!!
I'm not sure. I don't know much about motors but I don't see no reason not to put them both on the same 20 amp
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Old 08-23-2011, 05:52 PM   #55
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I need to do this tommorow , customer added a disposal unit.
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Old 08-23-2011, 11:13 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by electures
1/3 HP Disposal, 6.8 amps, 120V
Dishwasher 9.9 amps, 120V

Are they permitted on the same 20 amp circuit. I will reserve my thoughts for later.

PLEASE VOTE!!
Yes here in AZ very common
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Old 08-24-2011, 01:46 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raider1 View Post
Depends on if the receptacle under the sink is in a kitchen or not. A receptacle installed under a wet bar sink for a disposal would need to be GFCI protected but a receptacle installed under a sink in a kitchen would not.

Only receptacles serving the countertop in kitchens require GFCI protection whereas all receptacles within 6' of the edge of a wet bar sink require GFCI protection.

Chris
I'll take it we are talking about dwellings here and not commercial kitchens.
Commercial kitchen, its gfi no matter where in the kitchen last time I checked.
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Old 08-24-2011, 10:56 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macmikeman View Post
I'll take it we are talking about dwellings here and not commercial kitchens.
Commercial kitchen, its gfi no matter where in the kitchen last time I checked.
Correct, what I was referring too was a dwelling unit requirement.

Chris

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