extending co-ax and one 110V outlet in MC - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
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Old 01-21-2018, 07:40 PM   #1
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Default extending co-ax and one 110V outlet in MC

I need to extend a TV outlet several feet further up a wall for a new flat-screen TV; Commercial setting, will have to use MC.
Also, I need to extend the co-ax as well.
Do you know of any Arlington (or similar) products that can be retrofitted/cut into a wall with MC and a co-ax in the same box?
Thanks,
Rick
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Old 01-21-2018, 07:51 PM   #2
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You need to use one of those boxes with the dividers. Since it's MC it will have to be metal.

https://www.gordonelectricsupply.com...QaAmkJEALw_wcB
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Old 01-21-2018, 07:56 PM   #3
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Arlington does make these, see TVBS505 for example.

http://www.aifittings.com/products/s...re-2014-15.pdf
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Old 01-21-2018, 07:59 PM   #4
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Personally, I usually just cut in two separate boxes.

Also remember that the customer might need HDMI or other cables going up to the TV.
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Old 01-21-2018, 08:01 PM   #5
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https://www.mycablemart.com/store/ca...QaAsOxEALw_wcB
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Old 01-21-2018, 09:11 PM   #6
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I would just use a cut in box with maddison straps and a lock-nut connector for the mc, and a cut in data ring for the low voltage.
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Old 01-21-2018, 11:30 PM   #7
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What about a CI4101-LA? Not sure what they would be in the USA however.



Cheers
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Old 01-22-2018, 12:34 PM   #8
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Sometimes everything needs to be in a box.
To put it in existing, cut-in box.
For the communication I like to use the deep 3.5" cut in box if they will work because it provides a bit more room for the cables. If you need to install the jack on the plate on a 2.5" box you may overbend the coax.

I am a fan of not using a connector on the coax plate, and running thru to the monitor. But sometimes you need to use them. Such as if the customer only wants the jack.

I would not buy coax MX for only a few feet. Use flex conduit.
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Old 01-24-2018, 04:54 AM   #9
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Default Consideration if they have DirecTV

Depending on what you're running on the coaxial cable you may want to run it in separate emt depending on local code. If they have DirecTV or plan in putting that service in down the line; DirecTV actually has low voltage running through the RG6 or RG6Q to power the LNB for the Satellite system. Depends on how much of a pain the inspector is if you still have to deal with that. It's really low voltage though 21 volt or 29 volt depending on if they have a splitter or a switch. The splitters and switches used both have color coated connection points. If it's up to modern specs for DirecTV it should have orange connection points where your terminated coaxial is inserted. The same thing goes for the barrels that you use on the wall plate and to join to terminate pieces of coax if you have to go that route to extend. They're rated for the voltage where as the clear barrel connectors that usually come with the wall plate are not. Might be something to consider might not, just throwing it out there for you. If you go on google and look up Mastec Advanced Technology and they have a location where they do DirecTV installs near you, they always have this stuff in stock for their contractors and subcontractors. As far as the box goes I generally just get a 2 gang box and get a face plate that has a coax and outlet. Hope that helps man.
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Old 01-24-2018, 09:26 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bwalsh1991 View Post
Depending on what you're running on the coaxial cable you may want to run it in separate emt depending on local code. If they have DirecTV or plan in putting that service in down the line; DirecTV actually has low voltage running through the RG6 or RG6Q to power the LNB for the Satellite system. Depends on how much of a pain the inspector is if you still have to deal with that. It's really low voltage though 21 volt or 29 volt depending on if they have a splitter or a switch. The splitters and switches used both have color coated connection points. If it's up to modern specs for DirecTV it should have orange connection points where your terminated coaxial is inserted. The same thing goes for the barrels that you use on the wall plate and to join to terminate pieces of coax if you have to go that route to extend. They're rated for the voltage where as the clear barrel connectors that usually come with the wall plate are not. Might be something to consider might not, just throwing it out there for you. If you go on google and look up Mastec Advanced Technology and they have a location where they do DirecTV installs near you, they always have this stuff in stock for their contractors and subcontractors. As far as the box goes I generally just get a 2 gang box and get a face plate that has a coax and outlet. Hope that helps man.
This is interesting.

It was probably around 15 years ago that one of the jobs I did a lot for sidework was upgrading cable systems in houses. Everyone wanted cable internet and HD TV so they would need to upgrade the old RG-59 to RG-6. I would rewire the whole house with homeruns back to a central point and get rid of the daisy chained splitters around the house. I remember using PPC compression connectors and the better 3GHz F-81 barrel connectors in the wall plates.

But you are saying that there are orange ones now, huh?

I still have a bunch of Antronix splitters, but I never use them anymore since I really don't do cable upgrades any longer.
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Old 01-26-2018, 03:25 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HackWork View Post
This is interesting.

It was probably around 15 years ago that one of the jobs I did a lot for sidework was upgrading cable systems in houses. Everyone wanted cable internet and HD TV so they would need to upgrade the old RG-59 to RG-6. I would rewire the whole house with homeruns back to a central point and get rid of the daisy chained splitters around the house. I remember using PPC compression connectors and the better 3GHz F-81 barrel connectors in the wall plates.

But you are saying that there are orange ones now, huh?

I still have a bunch of Antronix splitters, but I never use them anymore since I really don't do cable upgrades any longer.
The orange ones with a red input for where the power supply gets fed into the system through a coaxial cable are called swim splitters they're specifically made for directv systems but work with any system if the user does change from DirecTV to cable. The old antronix splitter will heat up and burn out from the 21v or 29v power supply used based on which DirecTV system they have. The swim splitters and switchs use the red input on the splitter /switch to signify power in which goes up to the dish through RG6 from the drop coming down and signal comes back from the LNB the thing with the circle or multiple circles at the end of the arm for the satellite dish. The LNB used depends on which material you want to watch for example foreign language channels use specific satellites in space and require a different LNB ( Low noise block down converter). So not stereo typing but sometimes you can tell if there are foreigners in the house based off the equipment you can see on their roof or in their yard. The compression fittings are still the same for the most part, but they make ones that fit for RG-6 and RG-6 quad core now that's the biggest update I've seen in compression fittings for coax. But F-81 barrells are still used just color coated to indictate power passing for DirecTV systems. Cablevision in NY doesn't give a damn even if there is 59 in a house as long as they get signal. And I'm neurotic with every job I do. Everything has to be in a central location and labeled for each system. God forbid I have to go back to one of my jobs I can trouble shoot faster. The only system I really hate for home entertainment and communications because I haven't dealt with it as much as I'd like yet is fiber optics for FIOS.
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Old 01-26-2018, 04:42 AM   #12
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The fiber for FIOS stops at the ONT which is generally outside at the demarc, the rest of the system is just basic coax like cable. There is no part of the fiber system that is serviceable by the homeowner or their contractor.

The 15 year old PPC Compression fittings that I have (both regular and XL) are rated for dual and quad shield RG-6. That worked out well because I always used Belden tri shield which was right in the middle.

I also was able to find some PPC RG-59 compression connectors from Tech Tool Supply long ago which are good for when you have that one run of 59 that you don't have access to replace. Cut it back as short and clean as possible and install the good connectors.
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