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Old 08-09-2019, 09:59 AM   #21
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Oh, electric shock...


24 years ago, working in a supermarket remodel on a lighting circuit above the T-bar. Up a 10’ ladder.

I turned off all the breakers listed on the J-box and the NC tester agreed.


Got hit 277 from my hand to the inside of my bicep (same arm) where it brushed up against the grid.

Felt like I had been hit with a baseball bat.


I will never forget that.
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Old 08-09-2019, 10:06 AM   #22
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Looking back, it was in 1986, removing the wire from the breaker may have been the best solution.


Tim
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Old 08-09-2019, 11:07 AM   #23
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I started as an apprentice yanking wire in cheap condos. At finishing time, I got hit from hand to hand working on a live receptacle. It threw me across a bedroom. Don’t let anybody tell you, “It’s only 120V”.
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Old 08-09-2019, 01:41 PM   #24
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I bet you were"100cents" before that shock.


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Old 08-09-2019, 01:53 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by five.five-six View Post
Oh, electric shock...


24 years ago, working in a supermarket remodel on a lighting circuit above the T-bar. Up a 10’ ladder.

I turned off all the breakers listed on the J-box and the NC tester agreed.


Got hit 277 from my hand to the inside of my bicep (same arm) where it brushed up against the grid.

Felt like I had been hit with a baseball bat.


I will never forget that.

At least it didn't knock you off the ladder.
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Old 08-09-2019, 02:35 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wirenuting View Post
Most memorable was 120v, 600 cycles on a gun mount.
The later ones seemed insignificant.

The stuff is unforgiving.
I know 400hz on ships. Did not know of 600 Hz.

Why do they use them frequency anyway. My guess is better DC conversion in the old days.

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Old 08-09-2019, 02:51 PM   #27
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Airplanes use 400Hz also. The components get smaller.


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Old 08-09-2019, 03:12 PM   #28
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I wasn't only shocked, I was electrocuted

That hurt
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Old 08-09-2019, 03:38 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by emtnut View Post
I wasn't only shocked, I was electrocuted

That hurt
So, you're a g-g-g-ghost?!?

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Old 08-09-2019, 05:10 PM   #30
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The few times I worked at BAE, they had 400hz panels for the labs.
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Old 08-09-2019, 05:19 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canbug View Post
Airplanes use 400Hz also. The components get smaller.


Tim
Odd it would seem higher frequency would be more heat bigger components
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Old 08-09-2019, 05:38 PM   #32
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Odd it would seem higher frequency would be more heat bigger components

Never gave that a lot of thought but you' think it's true.
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Old 08-09-2019, 05:48 PM   #33
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I know 400hz on ships. Did not know of 600 Hz.

Why do they use them frequency anyway. My guess is better DC conversion in the old days.

Cowboy

I typed it wrong.
It was 400hz.... Synco/servo’s for train and elevation.

I was lucky and only brushed it... it was “officially” deenergized...
Yup, never trusted anyone after that day. I was lucky.
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Old 08-09-2019, 05:54 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wirenuting View Post
I typed it wrong.
It was 400hz.... Synco/servo’s for train and elevation.

I was lucky and only brushed it... it was “officially” deenergized...
Yup, never trusted anyone after that day. I was lucky.

I learned that lesson long ago!
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Old 08-11-2019, 10:09 AM   #35
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I received my most memorable shock long before I was even an electrician. I've always loved taking things apart, and one day when I was about 12 I was dismantling a disposable film camera. In the process my finger pushed on the switch for the flash, so the capacitor charged. I didn't notice and continued on my merry way, until I touched the top of the cap and got thrown back by the discharge.

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In auto shops we would charge up the distributor capacitor and throw it to someone. Decent shock when they caught it.

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As an apprentice we were working a reno for K-Mart, remember them. No lockouts and every time we turned a breaker off, some lady would come by behind us and turn it back on. I would get my morning wake up shock every day that summer.
im.

As a second year, doing a 600v motor replacement and the plant manager starts telling my JM about another motor which was dead, walks over and turns on the unit I was working on. With all 3 split bolts in the palm of my hand , they heard me yell. I came roaring into the control room, with the manager hot footing out the other door. JM grabs me because i was going to kill the guy.

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I remember every 277volt hit.
The first one was as a second-year apprentice from an exit light.
I was holding a piece of greenfield and pulled a red wire nut out of the box. Someone didn't make a good splice and the hot conductor came out and touched my finger. I fell off of a six-foot ladder into a trash pile.
Too many times that has happened. Really fn hurts on 347

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My best hit I ever took .

Remodeling a service center I had to remove the 4 foot fluorescent lights turned off the power and removed them . Well it was like 120 degrees so I turned the power on to run the fans on the ceiling . Unboxed the new lights jumped up on the work bench to hang the first light . Grabbed the mc cable striped it back hung the light and stripped the wires . Now my hot neutral and ground have bare ends hanging out of the light .

Now my helper ask me what's next . I lay him out on what to demo next . I jump back up on the work bench . Now I'm looking at the spinning fan so I don't get hit by the blades . Well I walked into the hot wire hanging out of the fixture and take 120 right to the head . The hit caused my to yank my head back and the back of my head gets tagged by the fan . The fan made me jerk forward back into the hot wires again . I repeated that process 4 times before I fell on my back on the work bench and then rolled onto the floor .

My helper is busting up laughing . I told him that's not funny . He says yes yes it is . Bout an hour later I walked up to my helper and said " ok yeah its funny " . Then I went to the store got some beer came back and watched my helper work while I had some beers .

Love my job good time good times .
Sorry for laughing, but guys would have paid to watch that.

However, similar situation for me.
We had removed some fixtures and the open splices were hanging out of the ceiling boxes. I wasn't thinking and while climbing the ladder, reached up and grabbed hold of the conduit run to steady myself. Took one more step up and touched the hot wire dead center of my head. Literally saw stars on that hit
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Old 08-11-2019, 12:35 PM   #36
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Worst shock i have received was using a plasma cutter with a high freq arc start. That hit like a stun gun and i face planted the floor.

Funniest shock was the new guy i was working with. Operator complained of a poke so we went over the area to find the cause.
I dragged my meter over everything in the area and found a pvc coated ridgid that was 277v to ground. Told the new guy that i had found it and that we needed to shut the lights down and fix the problem.
He told me that was impossible and the operator was just making crap up. You can not get shocked of a pvc coated pipe. I tried to explain that you can get poked of a pvc pipe if its wet so a pvc coated could shock you. He called bull and grabbed the pipe then like a smart arse and said "see i told you that you cant get shocked" .

Now i could have explained to him that he was standing on a fiberglass ladder and had no ground path but his attitude needed to be adjusted so i told him if he was that smart to touch the metal screw case with his other hand if he didn't believe my meter.

His nickname after that day was "pissy pants". Worked with the guy for year after and he was one of the safest guys i have ever worked with. He locked and checked everything after that day.
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Old 08-11-2019, 01:55 PM   #37
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I've had a couple of brushes against 347V hots that tickled pretty good, a couple of hot-hot 240V, a couple of 120V hot-neutrals.

I think the worst I got was from replacing the first wall sconce in a circuit in a row of 30-ish CFL-bulbed apartment hallway lights. Neutral splice fell apart and bridged across my hand, so I got the return path current of 10ish amps of lights through my fingers. That hurt something fierce.

Unless a circuit is mission critical, I just turn it off now for device replacement. It was a thrill as an apprentice to work live, but after a couple years now as a journeyman, it just aggravates me now.
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Old 08-11-2019, 11:19 PM   #38
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My very first experience with "the concept of electrical safety" was when I was 12 working a paper route to make money. I found out one of my customers was looking to pay someone to mow her lawn and took the opportunity. Thing is, she had an electric mower... maybe you can already see where this is going.

So yes, I did eventually run over the cord. Naturally, my immediate reaction was to say "oh no!" and pick up the mangled end... at least I can say I didn't hold on to it for long! Dad was my ride home and saw the whole thing.
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Old Yesterday, 08:50 PM   #39
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There are a few of these that I remember.

1) I was around 6 or 7 and my mom took me to mc Donalds. She's ordering food and little me is busy touching stuff. They had an overhang on the counter and they had either t-8 or t-12 lights installed under there. Well my finger found a tombstone with no paper cover in the terminals. That really hurt

2) about 9 years ago (+/- 1 or 2) I was tasked with installing a valance light. Asked my dad to test for power because I didn't have a non-contact tester. He said use your DMM. as I was stripping the wires, I found out the switch was on the hard way... power went in one hand,up my arm, across my chest, down my other arm, and out my other hand. I was hooked on that for what felt like eternity, but was probably only 20 to 30 seconds. As soon as it happened, my whole body tensed up. I stood there for a couple seconds trying to figure out what to do. Ended up yelling "Shut the power off!" Several times until someone did. My dad felt pretty bad after that... next day he got me a non-contact (not that you should trust them but that's a separate issue).

3) we had a customer call us at 3 pm one day. He was cutting down a tree and took down the service on his neighbours house (in-laws or his parents, I can't remember which). Hydro showed up and cut the power and said There, fix it. We decided to run a teck cable from his house to the one with no power. All went well until I was installing the breaker. Went to put the breaker in, and had forgot to turn It off (why we didn't shut off the main, I cannot remember). Well with one finger on each lug on the breaker, that gave me 240 volts through 2 fingers.

4) was trimming out a job last summer. I had most of the circuits off, and the condo was empty. I guess when my dad was doing joints he had accidentally hooked up a wire that was going to a new outlet. Well when I went to pull the wires out to put the receptacle on, the wire shorted to the plaster ring. Oddly enough, the breaker didn't trip... it shorted until it melted clear. I didn't get shocked but got a burn from the molten copper. 5 minutes later I was on my way to the supply house. Because I couldn't find my non-contact tester (which I still haven't found to this day) I bought a new fluke brand one (10/10 I would reccomend it even though it's 50$.). I ended up replacing all the breakers in the panel because there were a few that never tripped during construction (with a very heavy load sometimes.)

Those last 3 are the first and last times ice had those things happen. I'm a LOT more cautious now and days. I will double and triple check before touching.

I've never had a run in with 347/600, as I'm paranoid about that voltage. My dad's friend has no hair because of that voltage... apperently a disconnect blew up in his face.

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Old Today, 12:50 AM   #40
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My very first experience with "the concept of electrical safety" was when I was 12 working a paper route to make money. I found out one of my customers was looking to pay someone to mow her lawn and took the opportunity. Thing is, she had an electric mower... maybe you can already see where this is going.

So yes, I did eventually run over the cord. Naturally, my immediate reaction was to say "oh no!" and pick up the mangled end... at least I can say I didn't hold on to it for long! Dad was my ride home and saw the whole thing.
My first shock was taking a old 110 camera to pieces when the film got jammed. I was only 9 or 10 and it had a warning sticker saying danger high voltage which i though was weird as it only took 2 batteries.

Turns out the cap for the flash hurts like hell.
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