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Old 09-01-2009, 01:33 PM   #41
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..this includes Ryobi/Craftsman. They have their place for a DIY/Handyman/Hack/Home Owner know it all.
That's just ignorant.
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Old 09-01-2009, 04:55 PM   #42
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I use almost exclusively Milwaukee. They have good power, hold there charge and can survive a tumble.

Yes they do. I am a Milwaukee fan, I had one 18V hammerdrill for 6 years, and it was beat every step of the way, That finally died for the second time (rebuilt once) and I got another one along with a cordless sawzall and a cordless hatchet sawzall. The new drill took a fall out of a roof hatch and hit concrete about 22' down, batt pack flew off landed about 10' away, i climbed down the ladder and put the pack back on the drill and it still worked, and it still is going strong today.
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Old 09-05-2009, 08:11 AM   #43
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Has anyone tried Metabo or Hilti brand cordless drills?
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Old 09-05-2009, 05:35 PM   #44
 
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I go makita all the way!

But I must say I did have a dewalt set and it ran very well for the price.

Bosch was not good to me!
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Old 09-05-2009, 05:44 PM   #45
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Has anyone tried Metabo or Hilti brand cordless drills?
I have. If you're the type that feels compelled to have the absolute best of everything, those two brands will suit you fine. I try to strike a balance between performance and price. Doesn't always work, but that's the goal.
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Old 09-05-2009, 07:07 PM   #46
 
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I've used two Hilti cordless tools recently. The 18Volt Li-Ion cordless drill is VERY strong and lasts all day, but it's just as heavy as typical 18Volt drills. It's not like the Makita 18Volt Li-Ion in which you save a lot of weight.

Also, the 36Volt Li-Ion TE-7A is a thing of beauty. It drills for a LONG time (not all day, but long enough) and is as powerful as the Bosch Bulldog corded hammerdrills that we usually use. It's great not having to drag around a cord when drilling all day (especially when on a lift) and the nice thing about the Hilti is that it doesn't weigh much more than a corder hammer drill.

I definitely agree with the previous poster about not always having to have the best. But in the case of the TE-7A, I don't think anything comes close.
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Old 09-05-2009, 08:47 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by slowforthecones View Post
You might get kicked outta the union or laughed out of the union and the jobsite if you brought a b&d pile of crap to the site..this includes Ryobi/Craftsman. They have their place for a DIY/Handyman/Hack/Home Owner know it all.

I started with the IBEW with no drill, I did not get a drill on my tool list until my 4th year. This was over 11 years ago..

A good craftsman can make superior results with inferior equipment
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Old 09-05-2009, 08:51 PM   #48
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A good craftsman can make superior results with inferior equipment
That's absolutely true, but I'd rather have an unfair advantage. No sense making the job any harder than it has to be.
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Old 09-05-2009, 09:00 PM   #49
 
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A good craftsman can make superior results with inferior equipment
I couldn't agree more. But there is a HUGE difference between a good craftsmen and a good producer.
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Old 09-05-2009, 09:05 PM   #50
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I couldn't agree more. But there is a HUGE difference between a good craftsmen and a good producer.
Yeah, there's an angle I hadn't thought about. Matter of fact, some excellent craftsmen are terrible producers. Some guys can't balance the workmanship vs. productivity aspect of installing electrical work.
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Old 09-05-2009, 09:43 PM   #51
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Yeah, there's an angle I hadn't thought about. Matter of fact, some excellent craftsmen are terrible producers. Some guys can't balance the workmanship vs. productivity aspect of installing electrical work.
I agree 100 percent with that statement. And Ill take it one step further, the best electricians are the ones that are well rounded resi,commercial, and industrial. nothing pumps my nads more than when a guy tells me "I dont do old work resi, or guys that only have industrial experiance , or my all time favorite was a fella I interviewed three weeks ago that told me "Im a commercial specialist" and that I should only put him on commercial work....LMFAO...
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Old 09-05-2009, 10:30 PM   #52
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I use almost exclusively Milwaukee. They have good power, hold there charge and can survive a tumble.
Ahhh Milwaukee my first drill was an 18 volt nicad type and it was built in Germany....! hands down the best freakin drill ever built. Nothing has come even close to that beast. It would drill through wood like it was mad at it and the batteries lasted for a looooong time. Oh what happened to my beloved Milwaukee's. Every time I think about getting a different brand I always stay loyal to them.......
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Old 09-05-2009, 10:59 PM   #53
 
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I recently used a Makita bdf452hw. This is the black model with the smaller 1.5Ah battery that charges in 15 minutes.

They make the makita bdf452 model (which is the classic Makita blue/green color) with the 3Ah battery that charges in 30 minutes but weighs more and costs more, but I believe the drill itself is exactly the same.

Has anyone used either of these models?

I like the makita bdf452hw a lot because it weighs almost nothing. I have a full set of Dewalt 18Volt tools and when I need a really strong drill I could break that out. But the Makita seems like it would be great for all the normal drill/driving needs, and it would be a pleasure to use instead of the heavy Dewalt 18Volt.
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Old 09-06-2009, 07:33 PM   #54
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I agree 100 percent with that statement. And Ill take it one step further, the best electricians are the ones that are well rounded resi,commercial, and industrial. nothing pumps my nads more than when a guy tells me "I dont do old work resi, or guys that only have industrial experiance , or my all time favorite was a fella I interviewed three weeks ago that told me "Im a commercial specialist" and that I should only put him on commercial work....LMFAO...

i'm a 2nd year apprentice that only has industrial and very little commercial experince... the company i work for only does industrial. i was subbed to another company to rope mc in some stores... i'm willing to learn any aspect of the trade though...

i guess that pumps your nads huh?

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Old 09-06-2009, 09:27 PM   #55
 
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i guess that pumps your nads huh?
Yeah, he won't like me either. I'm sure you could find any day laborer at the local Home Depot that could rope a new house faster than me since I don't have much experience in that circumstance.

I'd like to learn, but it's just not what we do that often. I'd really like to learn all the tips and tricks of fishing houses, I missed out on that since my apprenticeship was mostly commercial.
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Old 09-06-2009, 10:42 PM   #56
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There are so many aspects to electrical.

Hell, any trade.

A framing carpenter may be able to throw up a house in no time, but he could struggle crafting the moulding around a window.

It's silly to expect someone to be a pro at it all.
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Old 09-07-2009, 01:23 AM   #57
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Yeah, he won't like me either. I'm sure you could find any day laborer at the local Home Depot that could rope a new house faster than me since I don't have much experience in that circumstance.

I'd like to learn, but it's just not what we do that often. I'd really like to learn all the tips and tricks of fishing houses, I missed out on that since my apprenticeship was mostly commercial.

exactly my point, and thanks frasbee for that explanation. because someone may not have experience, they may feel inclined to want to to what they know how to do. i sure would but i along with many others i'm sure would be down to learn another aspect of the trade.
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Old 09-07-2009, 10:27 AM   #58
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It's silly to expect someone to be a pro at it all.
You're right, but that's the wish, just the same.

What gets me cranked up is when a guy applies for a job and says that he can do X, Y, and Z, when he's really only good at X.
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Old 09-07-2009, 10:58 AM   #59
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Has anyone tried Metabo or Hilti brand cordless drills?
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I try to strike a balance between performance and price. Doesn't always work, but that's the goal.
I have Ryobi and Rigid cordless drills and they are fine for most applications. Some things you can't cut corners on. A couple years ago I bought a Hilti SFH 181-A. That drill absolutely kicks butt. If you need to install tapcons all day long, Hilti IMO is a must.

Just bought the SFH 18A last week, the SFH 181-A has been discontinued. Oooohh, shiny!

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Old 09-07-2009, 11:02 AM   #60
 
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That 18-A is what I've been using, it really is super powerful and the batteries last a long time.

The only thing is that it's heavy. I thought Li-Ion drills were supposed to be light, but the 18-A is heavier than typical 18V NiCad or NiMH drills.
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