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Old 07-01-2020, 03:14 AM   #1
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Default Reducing Rigid conduit hub?

Is there such a thing? I've been looking all over Platt and graybar and a few other places but I can't find it.

I know I've used one before on a peckerhead, or maybe it was just some reducing bushings in there and I didn't notice lol.

A lot of times I get motors with huge holes, like 1-1/2" or bigger and I'm only going to use a 3/4" gland or entry. Reducing washers won't work it has to be waterproof. Don't want to use reducing bushings.

I don't want to go loosening the gland nut and have one of the bushings start turning

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Old 07-01-2020, 06:05 AM   #2
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You never stated what you are looking for.

Are you sure you’re not referring to a cord grip (CGB)? These can be very large.

Look at Roxtec for cable glands that can adapt to almost anything and are NEMA 4X and work in hazardous locations. Kind of pricey but very good for what they are.

If you’re just talking about reducing bushings these are pretty common but sometimes have to be stacked or look at plumbing ones.
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Old 07-01-2020, 06:21 AM   #3
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If you have enough flat space you could use a 3/4" square hub



but you probably already thought of that.

If you use reducing bushings and paint it, that would help.

I know the issue you're talking about with the cord grip glands, but only if you have only one channellocks. if you use two wrenches / pliers, one holding the base tight while the other turns the gland nut, it's not an issue.

I usually only tighten the cord grips finger tight, so I can do it with one wrench.
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Old 07-01-2020, 06:28 AM   #4
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Quote:
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If you have enough flat space you could use a 3/4" square hub



but you probably already thought of that.
I thought those aren't watertight? I thought they only work to keep water out because the hole underneath them is on a level surface and the edge of the hole is upturned so the water flows away?
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Old 07-01-2020, 08:43 AM   #5
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Quote:
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I thought those aren't watertight? I thought they only work to keep water out because the hole underneath them is on a level surface and the edge of the hole is upturned so the water flows away?

You might be right about that. I think maybe I've seen them for when you have to punch holes in nema 3r / 4x outdoor enclosures, ones that came with a gasket, but that could be imagination.
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Old 07-01-2020, 08:59 AM   #6
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Standard procedure for us is myers hubs with reducing bushings.

I won't use reducing washers, they usually end up loose 9 times out of 10 on motors.
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Old 07-01-2020, 09:53 AM   #7
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Second for Myers hub.
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Old 07-01-2020, 10:25 AM   #8
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Dumb question...if you run into this enough...how hard would it be to mount a plate with the right size hole or get a different peckerhead from somewhere (a junk motor, motor shop, manufacturer etc)?
Run full size sealtight (it's a motor, vibration dampening) to the peckerhead & transition from 3/4" to whatever size the peckerhead needs further back? jbox or condulet? Mount condulet to peckerhead (yes, that does look crummy)?
Reducing bushings always seemed to be short on thread length unless you made your own (if you can).
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Old 07-01-2020, 10:27 AM   #9
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Uses a Myers Hub then a reducing bushing
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Old 07-01-2020, 03:21 PM   #10
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Quote:
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Dumb question...if you run into this enough...how hard would it be to mount a plate with the right size hole or get a different peckerhead from somewhere (a junk motor, motor shop, manufacturer etc)?
Run full size sealtight (it's a motor, vibration dampening) to the peckerhead & transition from 3/4" to whatever size the peckerhead needs further back? jbox or condulet? Mount condulet to peckerhead (yes, that does look crummy)?
Reducing bushings always seemed to be short on thread length unless you made your own (if you can).
For me I never know what I'm going to run into when it comes to peckerheads. Metric, PG, NPT, or a big hole that I need to stick a tiny cable in. We're all cable, no conduit anywhere minus a few special circumstances maybe.

I think I'm being picky. But when your down in a hole and you want to get the new motor installed so it's completely waterproof you have to have the right fittings so you can install and forget about it and move on.
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Old 07-01-2020, 03:37 PM   #11
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What about red locktite on a reducing bushing?
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Old 07-01-2020, 03:45 PM   #12
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I think if it is a washdown motor, it will have it's own connection / gland. Other then that, any other motor may be damp rated and a reducing bushing and a standard gland type connector or liquid seal / teck90 would be fine.

I have connected a lot of motors that are outside (not washdown areas) and have never had a problem with this type of install. If I was super concerned, I might flip the peckerhead so the connector was at the bottom, but even then I am not that worried about it.

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Old 07-01-2020, 03:47 PM   #13
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Quote:
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Uses a Myers Hub then a reducing bushing
I think this is the best solution. I'm going to order and premake a couple different sizes with some good sealant. 1-1/2" to 3/4", 1-1/4" to 1/2" etc
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Old 07-01-2020, 05:57 PM   #14
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Keep in mind rigid conduit is not and was never intended to be water tight. If nothing else no matter the shape or machining NPT and NPST threads cannot mate 100% perfectly tight. There is always a gap. Even if it’s just a spiral at the roots it leaks. That’s why plumbers use thread sealant, anaerobic or tape. A Myers hub helps on one end but not the other.

This isn’t Code (NEC not required in mines) but this is a trick we used in the mining business. Put a reducing washer both inside and outside but put them in backwards so the small part sticks out. Run a liberal amount of silicone between them. Tighten conduit nuts down on both sides. The silicone caulk seals not only under the washers but also makes a tight seal around the conduit itself on both sides, what the Myers hub doesn’t do, and it’s cheaper. But we’d also silicone or RTV peckerhead covers shut and generally make a mess out if just about anything waterproofing it with tons of silicone caulk.
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Old 07-01-2020, 07:41 PM   #15
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Quote:
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Reducing bushings always seemed to be short on thread length unless you made your own (if you can).
If you need more thread, explosion proof reducing bushings have 7 threads, whereas regular bushings have only 5.
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Old 07-01-2020, 08:17 PM   #16
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I forgot to mention above, in wet locations, we also come in the bottom of peckerheads, if possible. If there is no way to do that or it's just to impractical to come in the bottom, I will come in the top. I also drill an 1/8-3/16 drain hole in the bottom of the peckerheads if it's a wet location. I'm not even going to try and keep water out of the peckerhead. There's no point. Conduit and fittings are not water tight. What I'm going to do is point my splices up, put some antisieze on the peckerhead cover screws(small baldor's like to break off when they sieze up), and drill a drain hole.

Good to go.

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If you need more thread, explosion proof reducing bushings have 7 threads, whereas regular bushings have only 5.
Our supply houses over here only stock the ex prf type. They didn't want to carry two different types for the sake of two extra threads. I think the price is pretty much the same. Makes sense to me.
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Old 07-02-2020, 08:16 AM   #17
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What's wrong with reducing bushings? I've used them on every Weg motor I've wired. I keep reducing bushings on the truck so I can screw in a t&b ranger nylon cord connector or sealtight connector. I almost always come in the bottom, and if not the bottom, then the side, and have never experienced water ingress through the reducing bushing. I keep the locknut on 90 degree sealtite connectors so I can snug it down in the direction I want to go.

Also, f*ck reducing washers on motors. They are garbage and always work loose. I've been known to plug the factory hole and punch a smaller one in a different spot just so I don't have to deal with the stupid things. The last thing I want is for them to work loose, and then have the wires dangling and rubbing against the sharp reducing washer.
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Old 07-17-2020, 03:14 AM   #18
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Nothing just everytime I go to loosen the nut on a cable gland either the lock ring, reducing bushing, or whatever wasn't tightened down starts turning instead. Huge pain in the ass, especially when you're in a bad spot.

But I ended up ordering some on Platt that had small flats on them so at least I'll be able to get them tight. They usually rust solid after a while anyway I guess.
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