Residential Must Have Tools - Page 2 - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum > Tools, Equipment & Safety > Tools, Equipment and New Products


Like Tree28Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-06-2018, 01:52 PM   #21
:-)
 
daveEM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Alberta
Posts: 3,665
Rewards Points: 2,374
Default

@Woot... hit the <enter> key several times in your wall of text. Damn I want to read that.
zac and telsa like this.
__________________
<<
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


I like perfect.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
daveEM is offline   Reply With Quote
Join Contractor Talk

Join the #1 Electrician Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

ElectricianTalk.com - Are you a Professional Electrical Contractor? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's the leading place for electricians to meet online. No homeowners asking DIY questions. Just fellow tradesmen who enjoy talking about their business, their trade, and anything else that comes up. No matter what your specialty is you'll find that ElectricianTalk.com is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free!

Join ElectricianTalk.com - Click Here JOIN FOR FREE


Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ElectricianTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-11-2018, 12:41 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 168
Rewards Points: 279
Default

I think this depends a lot if you are doing repairs/add-ons in older properties or residential as in "new construction".

No one mentioned a MC/BX cutter...? I use MC exclusively for unfinished basements and garages -especially lighting systems, ceiling or wall receptacles for shops, heaters and the switch, laundry receptacles, etc. MC has been really good for running baseboard heat on the first floor where the wire comes up through the floor into the heaters. Surface mounted oven receptacles, dish washers, kick heaters, more.

A folding saw that fits sawzall blades. And get PLASTER BLADES! They last forever if you are cutting drywall or plaster.

A 4" grinder for cutting meter locks, pad-locked basements, panel locks, anything that is case-hardened. Great for adding receptacles in tile walls and concrete/cinder block.

People will laugh, but if you're just doing resi work, you don't need 4-6 fancy screw drivers; get a cheap 4/6 'n 1.

9.5" lineman's pliers (they feel so much better than 9"ers). Although I keep a hammer in my van, I use my lineman's as a hammer a lot -especially in tight places.

Retractable razor, NOT a knife. And either tape it up or get a plastic one since it's safer.

A 4' ladder. And write IN CAPITAL LETTERS in several places: "NO PAINT/NO PLASTER" ...because some **** on some job will grab it and then your ladder starts having flakey stuff that gets left at your customers' houses. Make sure that the GC knows you will walk the **** off the job if someone uses your ladder for painting.

Drop cloths. Also: I keep a door mat in my van which I put at the top of the basement stairs. My customers LOVE ME.

2" Painter's tape: I make a little "shelf" out of it so that any holes that I cut above it don't drop plaster dust near the inevitable crack between the drop cloth and the baseboard.

A 250+ lumen mini-flashlight that I can hold in my teeth if I have to. Also a headlamp; mine is allegedly 2,000 lumens and rechargeable.

A reversible stubby screw driver.

Later:
Cordless hammerdrill -18 volts minimum. A serious metal case that you love. I use a Bosch demolition hammerdrill case that is from the 1980s. It's survived 4 drills and it has SO much stuff in it. 4", 4 1/8", 4 1/4" hole saws.

Good fishing rods and ball-chains with LOTS of attachments. Magnetic fishing tools like Magna-Pull, magnetic tips for your fish rods, magnetic chains, and bullets for fishing tools. LOTS of magnets; I don't even use a helper anymore -if you are on a crew, everyone will be so impressed with how fast you are. Drop a magnetic chain in the wall from the 2nd or 3rd floor, drill a 3/4" hole in the basement ceiling, poke a rod up there with a magnet to snag the chain and you are done pulling wire by the time some dude is still trying to make a bigger hole.

An in-wall camera. HUGE time saver!

Buy gadgets. Being well-equipped makes you stand out. I've "competed" next to crews of 2-3 guys and gotten right to work while they are still arguing about how to drop the lead weight down the wall.

One of the most important tools: your brain and your attitude.
Love your job -or do something else. SERVE your customers, don't just "work". It takes a while, but don't compete on price as much as you compete on service. Assume every customer is going to review you online -but don't do a great job because you're scared of that; do it because you like being a rock-star hero. Make sure every customer's kids, cat, and dog love you. Whether you work for your boss or your work for customers who hire you: Exceed Expectations. Be nice to your inspector; s/he is YOUR EMPLOYEE, not your enemy. Show them how you went above and beyond the NEC. If you find something truly horrible/dangerous, take a "before" picture to show them. My inspector often tells my customers how lucky they are to have me because I do neat and thorough work. One reason he knows that is because I let him know what I do so that he knows that I make his job easier and he trusts my concern for my customers.
splatz and ElectricianTalk like this.
Greg Sparkovich is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Greg Sparkovich For This Useful Post:
Kevin_Essiambre (05-11-2018), mainlug (05-15-2018), telsa (05-11-2018)
Old 05-11-2018, 09:21 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Timbuktu
Posts: 279
Rewards Points: 431
Default

Greg, great post and recommendations.

If there is one point on your list I have to second, third, ad infinitum, it is the comments about the ladders. I work around dormitory areas and we CONSTANTLY raise pure billyblue hell with our lazy painters. They have a pickup load of lightweight, easy to pack alumimium ladders and will not keep them handy. Too easy to go to our maintenance closets and grab our fiberglass ladders. And no matter HOW HARD YOU TRY you canot keep the flakes and dust off the customers floors. People's stupidity rarely surprises me anymore.
MechanicalDVR likes this.
Satch is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-11-2018, 09:51 PM   #24
MTW
Senior Member
 
MTW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Northeast USA
Posts: 13,886
Rewards Points: 6,912
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Sparkovich View Post
Good fishing rods and ball-chains with LOTS of attachments. Magnetic fishing tools like Magna-Pull, magnetic tips for your fish rods, magnetic chains, and bullets for fishing tools. LOTS of magnets; I don't even use a helper anymore -if you are on a crew, everyone will be so impressed with how fast you are. Drop a magnetic chain in the wall from the 2nd or 3rd floor, drill a 3/4" hole in the basement ceiling, poke a rod up there with a magnet to snag the chain and you are done pulling wire by the time some dude is still trying to make a bigger hole.


I consider myself an expert at old work and have done it my entire electrical career, yet what you describe is strange. Assuming interior walls, how do you get to a 3rd floor from the basement without drilling through the intermediate top and bottom plates? With balloon framing what you describe is quite easy on exterior walls, but interior walls are never framed this way. I can snake an exterior balloon framed wall without having to use magnets and glow sticks.

Last edited by MTW; 05-11-2018 at 09:54 PM.
MTW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2018, 01:37 AM   #25
Magic Smoke Remover
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 1,004
Rewards Points: 1,966
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoGP1199 View Post
A folder on phone or computer for each job to save pictures after rough in. This will help figure out where your wires are when the drywall guys either bury your box, can light, or put a screw through romex. lol (serious, this is no joke). Then cut a big ass hole so he has to patch it.
This is only for your benefit. I like to know exactly where my $hit is so I know where NOT to cut an exploratory hole.

Cut-cut-cut recept sized hole, keeping the little piece of gyp. "DAM IT, IT'S NOT HERE!"

**move 6 inches over, right along the trim or casing** cut-cut-cut

Pro tip: For even more fun, make the drywaller cut it out for you, of course where the wire ISN'T. "I think it's right here!"

matt1124 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2018, 03:04 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 168
Rewards Points: 279
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MTW View Post


I consider myself an expert at old work and have done it my entire electrical career, yet what you describe is strange. Assuming interior walls, how do you get to a 3rd floor from the basement without drilling through the intermediate top and bottom plates? With balloon framing what you describe is quite easy on exterior walls, but interior walls are never framed this way. I can snake an exterior balloon framed wall without having to use magnets and glow sticks.
Gotcha. I should have explained, because neither of us mentioned the obvious: using the plumbing stack, pipe chase, or next to a vent. A ball chain is invaluable here for multi-story drops.
My prefered method is to fish from the attic down to the basement (usually unfinished where I live) and spread out from the attic and go down into the top floor for instance.

If I can't use the stack:
I look for (but rarely find perfectly lined up) receptacles and/or switches stacked directly over each other (for instance in a hallway wall running the length of the house). If they are in the baseboards (old houses, right?) it's easy pull out the wall case (old work box) to drill through the sole plate -in which case I usually drop a chain from the top and rather than sticking my hand into the hole, I poke the floppy "bullet magnet" attachment for my MagnaPull and it grabs it quick wherever it is in the stud bay. Then I just drop the chain down and do the same thing below. If someone wants to do this, keep in mind that walls are not always built directly above each other, but usually within the same joist bay.

Other wise, I drill a 1" hole in the wall about 2"-3"" below the ceiling, stick a 7/8" bit (18" long) in the hole and drill upwards through the top plate (7/8" is the best size for my strongest magnetic bullet). From above, I do the same thing starting 1" above the baseboard going downward. Again, if someone wants to do this, keep in mind that walls are not always built directly above each other, but usually within the same joist bay.

Also, as a "cheat", sometimes I'll suggest to a customer that they let me add another receptacle in the wall 1 storey below the place I'm going to so I can cut a bigger hole to use to fish (and then put the receptacle there when I'm done -which will look better than a patch). The cost of adding a box and receptacle in often worth the savings in fishing time depending on the building. To encourage them, I might say "Hey, you know I'm running wires past this spot anyhow ..I could put a receptacle in here for $50" -since I am making better money/hour if I'm cutting my fishing time spending 15(?) minutes to make $50 plus saving time on my bid job is great for both of us.

I work in a lot of historic homes with crown moldings and fancy wood work so it can be a challenge. When someone tells me that they had another electrician tell them that they would have to remove the wood or cut a chanel, I smile inside. My way takes a little longer, but it doesn't disrupt the home like channeling plaster does and if you factor in the cost of a good carpenter or historical plasterer, I can make a lot of money by charging more and save my customers some $ too! Caveat: I work alone and can do this, but I'd be lying if I said that I'm not more efficient with a helper here. I don't do this enough to hire someone full-time, but I will hire friends or their helpers to do this sort of thing.
MTW and splatz like this.

Last edited by Greg Sparkovich; 05-12-2018 at 03:25 PM.
Greg Sparkovich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2018, 04:45 PM   #27
Old Grumpy Bastard
 
MechanicalDVR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Old Dominion"
Posts: 57,628
Rewards Points: 17,458
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Sparkovich View Post
I think this depends a lot if you are doing repairs/add-ons in older properties or residential as in "new construction".

No one mentioned a MC/BX cutter...? I use MC exclusively for unfinished basements and garages -especially lighting systems, ceiling or wall receptacles for shops, heaters and the switch, laundry receptacles, etc. MC has been really good for running baseboard heat on the first floor where the wire comes up through the floor into the heaters. Surface mounted oven receptacles, dish washers, kick heaters, more.

A folding saw that fits sawzall blades. And get PLASTER BLADES! They last forever if you are cutting drywall or plaster.

A 4" grinder for cutting meter locks, pad-locked basements, panel locks, anything that is case-hardened. Great for adding receptacles in tile walls and concrete/cinder block.

People will laugh, but if you're just doing resi work, you don't need 4-6 fancy screw drivers; get a cheap 4/6 'n 1.

9.5" lineman's pliers (they feel so much better than 9"ers). Although I keep a hammer in my van, I use my lineman's as a hammer a lot -especially in tight places.

Retractable razor, NOT a knife. And either tape it up or get a plastic one since it's safer.

A 4' ladder. And write IN CAPITAL LETTERS in several places: "NO PAINT/NO PLASTER" ...because some **** on some job will grab it and then your ladder starts having flakey stuff that gets left at your customers' houses. Make sure that the GC knows you will walk the **** off the job if someone uses your ladder for painting.

Drop cloths. Also: I keep a door mat in my van which I put at the top of the basement stairs. My customers LOVE ME.

2" Painter's tape: I make a little "shelf" out of it so that any holes that I cut above it don't drop plaster dust near the inevitable crack between the drop cloth and the baseboard.

A 250+ lumen mini-flashlight that I can hold in my teeth if I have to. Also a headlamp; mine is allegedly 2,000 lumens and rechargeable.

A reversible stubby screw driver.

Later:
Cordless hammerdrill -18 volts minimum. A serious metal case that you love. I use a Bosch demolition hammerdrill case that is from the 1980s. It's survived 4 drills and it has SO much stuff in it. 4", 4 1/8", 4 1/4" hole saws.

Good fishing rods and ball-chains with LOTS of attachments. Magnetic fishing tools like Magna-Pull, magnetic tips for your fish rods, magnetic chains, and bullets for fishing tools. LOTS of magnets; I don't even use a helper anymore -if you are on a crew, everyone will be so impressed with how fast you are. Drop a magnetic chain in the wall from the 2nd or 3rd floor, drill a 3/4" hole in the basement ceiling, poke a rod up there with a magnet to snag the chain and you are done pulling wire by the time some dude is still trying to make a bigger hole.

An in-wall camera. HUGE time saver!

Buy gadgets. Being well-equipped makes you stand out. I've "competed" next to crews of 2-3 guys and gotten right to work while they are still arguing about how to drop the lead weight down the wall.

One of the most important tools: your brain and your attitude.
Love your job -or do something else. SERVE your customers, don't just "work". It takes a while, but don't compete on price as much as you compete on service. Assume every customer is going to review you online -but don't do a great job because you're scared of that; do it because you like being a rock-star hero. Make sure every customer's kids, cat, and dog love you. Whether you work for your boss or your work for customers who hire you: Exceed Expectations. Be nice to your inspector; s/he is YOUR EMPLOYEE, not your enemy. Show them how you went above and beyond the NEC. If you find something truly horrible/dangerous, take a "before" picture to show them. My inspector often tells my customers how lucky they are to have me because I do neat and thorough work. One reason he knows that is because I let him know what I do so that he knows that I make his job easier and he trusts my concern for my customers.

Good list but the fishing gear is something I used all the time in commercial work, so it isn't just for old resi work when speed is concerned.
__________________
I'm as Christian as possible in the times we live in.

Always just a stallion in a china shop
MechanicalDVR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2018, 11:20 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Washington
Posts: 377
Rewards Points: 24
Default

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rack-A-T...FUa-ZAodwz0GQA


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Kevin_Essiambre likes this.
Drsparky14 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Residential makes me feel dumb. TGGT Residential Electrical Forum 31 05-12-2018 05:01 PM
GIVEAWAY: Klein Tools 25 Ft. Double Hook Magnetic Tape Measure Cricket General Electrical Discussion 77 12-16-2016 07:24 PM
Electrician Tools, tools that will set you apart from your peers!? JasonCo General Electrical Discussion 68 05-04-2016 08:34 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com