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Old 09-04-2009, 11:56 PM   #1
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Default Solenoid testers??

Is there any advantage to still having a solenoid tester in the electrical field?
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Old 09-04-2009, 11:59 PM   #2
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Is there any advantage to still having a solenoid tester in the electrical field?
Sure. It puts a bit of a real load on the circuit to rule out 'phantom voltage' readings so common with DMM's. Plus, they don't take batteries, are relatively inexpensive, and are more tolerant of harsh environmental conditions. If I was a mill electrician or something along those lines, a solenoid tester might be my every day meter.
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Old 09-05-2009, 12:26 AM   #3
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Old 09-05-2009, 12:44 AM   #4
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MDShunk- Is there hazard of the tester blowing up as this meter will be used in a live factory?
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Old 09-05-2009, 12:53 AM   #5
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In addition what about measuring amps?
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Old 09-05-2009, 12:59 AM   #6
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In addition what about measuring amps?
As far as measuring current, you would want to buy a clamp on ammeter.

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Old 09-05-2009, 07:45 AM   #7
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I do lots of electrical testing and when it comes to go no go testing is it energized I use a Wiggy Style tester every time.
Multimeters are a PIA to hold and use in this circumstance.

I never use a combination meter for anything. I want an amp clamp to be a dedicated amp clamp. I do not believe in a combination hammer, pliers, screw driver works and I feel the same about test equipment.

Compact, Cat III, and a feeling of it is ON, no batteries, no calibration necessary.

Always test your tester EVERY TIME.

http://www.knoppinc.com/
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Old 09-05-2009, 08:05 AM   #8
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So a wiggy would be good for go no go testing. However would a DMM listed as being True RMS eliminate ghost voltages?
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Old 09-05-2009, 08:07 AM   #9
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MDShunk- Is there hazard of the tester blowing up as this meter will be used in a live factory?
Yes there is, meters need to be rated for the type (CAT) of system they are being used on, most factory systems are CAT III.

The IEC 61010 is the new standard for low voltage “test, measurement and control equipment”. The IEC 61010 provides much improved protection against over voltage impulse transients (voltage spikes) and is the basis for:

• ANSI/ISA-S82.01-94 (US)
• CAN C22.2 No. 1010.1-92 (CAN)
• EN61010-1:1993 (EUR)

IEC 61010 defines four locations or categories:
  • CAT I - Protected electronic circuits
  • CAT II - Receptacle outlet circuit; plug-in loads.
  • CAT III - Distribution wiring, including “mains” bus, feeders and branch circuits; permanently installed loads.
  • CAT IV - “Origin of installation” Utility level and any outside cable run
The level and energy of voltage impulses is dependent on the location. The closer the location is to the power source, the higher the available fault current, the higher the category.

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Old 09-05-2009, 10:02 AM   #10
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Yes there is, meters need to be rated for the type (CAT) of system they are being used on, most factory systems are CAT III.

The IEC 61010 is the new standard for low voltage “test, measurement and control equipment”. The IEC 61010 provides much improved protection against over voltage impulse transients (voltage spikes) and is the basis for:

• ANSI/ISA-S82.01-94 (US)
• CAN C22.2 No. 1010.1-92 (CAN)
• EN61010-1:1993 (EUR)


IEC 61010 defines four locations or categories:
  • CAT I - Protected electronic circuits
  • CAT II - Receptacle outlet circuit; plug-in loads.
  • CAT III - Distribution wiring, including “mains” bus, feeders and branch circuits; permanently installed loads.
  • CAT IV - “Origin of installation” Utility level and any outside cable run
The level and energy of voltage impulses is dependent on the location. The closer the location is to the power source, the higher the available fault current, the higher the category.

Zog:

Since your in a few forums and I consider somewhat of a Safety Standards Guru, what's your personal opinion of a Kopp K-60 type wiggy? Do you use one? What do you use?

I perfer the Fluke line because along with the CAT ratings, they test their products by trying to blow them up! I've seen a video of their test chamber for that. I use a Fluke T+ Pro.
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Old 09-05-2009, 01:18 PM   #11
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Zog:

Since your in a few forums and I consider somewhat of a Safety Standards Guru, what's your personal opinion of a Kopp K-60 type wiggy? Do you use one? What do you use?

I perfer the Fluke line because along with the CAT ratings, they test their products by trying to blow them up! I've seen a video of their test chamber for that. I use a Fluke T+ Pro.
Never used a wiggy, never will. For LV testing I use Fluke 87 series multimeters.
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Old 09-05-2009, 01:26 PM   #12
 
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Never used a wiggy, never will. For LV testing I use Fluke 87 series multimeters.
zog, obviously you have no expierience in construction.
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Old 09-05-2009, 01:48 PM   #13
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zog, obviously you have no expierience in construction.
Never used a wiggy either, never will. Might as well use a light bulb taped to a couple of pieces of wire. Wiggys were fine in Edison’s time.
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Old 09-05-2009, 02:01 PM   #14
 
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Never used a wiggy either, never will. Might as well use a light bulb taped to a couple of pieces of wire. Wiggys were fine in Edison’s time.
dr, obviously you have no expierence in construction.... either.
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Old 09-05-2009, 02:25 PM   #15
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dr, obviously you have no expierence in construction.... either.
Care to explain what wiggys has to do with construction?
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Old 09-05-2009, 02:36 PM   #16
 
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Care to explain what wiggys has to do with construction?
sure. why carry a $ 200 dvm in the mud to check out why the block saw aint got no power. wiggy works just fine. its mainly just the right tool for the job. amazing what can happen to stuff in construction work. keep the fluke in the truck til the job requires it.
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Old 09-05-2009, 02:43 PM   #17
 
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So if someone uses an expensive tool, they have no experience in construction?

I've been using my Fluke T5 for many, many years. It's one tester that will do continuity, current, and give me a real voltage measurement. It's made for the construction site and costs about $90. The leads are much thicker than normal leads and the probes snap into the case of the meter for storage as well as clipping into the top of the meter so you can test with two hands while still holding the meter.

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Old 09-05-2009, 02:50 PM   #18
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A tick tester in will "check out why the block saw aint got no power". You also can buy a good rugged DVM for the same price as a wiggy.
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Old 09-05-2009, 02:53 PM   #19
 
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A tick tester in will "check out why the block saw aint got no power". You also can buy a good rugged DVM for the same price as a wiggy.
http://www.techtoolsupply.com/index....OD&ProdID=3544
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Old 09-05-2009, 02:55 PM   #20
 
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if i was'nt getting so close to retirement thats the next tester i would get. some of the guys i work with have em . did'nt have em 30 yrs ago.
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