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Old 05-01-2018, 10:11 AM   #521
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When working with threaded rod, don't use your Channellocks to drive it into the coupling or anchor.

Take two nuts and, using two wrenches, jam them together at the end of the rod. Use a box-end wrench or socket to drive it in like a really long bolt. When it's tight, just use an open-end wrench to drive the second nut further down the rod, freeing the first nut.

I've gotten funny looks from journeymen when doing this, but I like it because I get to stay in one spot when making racks, and I don't have to mess up any part of the thread with my Channellocks.

If you're using 3/8 rod, ask the tin-knockers for a couple of their large nuts.
This is a good idea. I did something along those lines when I was building racks, lots and lots of racks...
I took a rod coupler and a 5" piece of all thread. Screw the all thread about 1/2 way into the all thread and drill into the side of the coupler right through the all thread. Add a spring pin or cotter pin and you're set. Throw it on a drill and go to town.

I had 3 of these made up for different sizes of all thread.
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Old 05-01-2018, 02:57 PM   #522
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This is a good idea. I did something along those lines when I was building racks, lots and lots of racks...
I took a rod coupler and a 5" piece of all thread. Screw the all thread about 1/2 way into the all thread and drill into the side of the coupler right through the all thread. Add a spring pin or cotter pin and you're set. Throw it on a drill and go to town.

I had 3 of these made up for different sizes of all thread.
You know that drivers like that are available with a 1/4" hex quick connect to fit in a drill or impact?

[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 08-04-2018, 07:28 PM   #523
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I use these for backups on screws for the installation of cameras and other devices on ceiling tile or drywall. They hold well and are easily removable. Been using these for years and recently saw other technicians have discovered my secret.

They are the push on backers for duct insulation and you can buy them by the box for pennies compared to threaded or expanding screw inserts. and they don't tear up the tiles.

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Old 05-22-2019, 01:04 PM   #524
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When pulling control circuits. We use 5 or 6 different colors wires and group them together with phasing tape. If you had to number each one it would take forever.

Your control panels must look like a Skittles factory.


Around here, 120VAC control is red, 24V is blue, Interlocks are yellow - That's it !!


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Old 09-02-2019, 07:09 PM   #525
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Hey Grounded-B thanks for the necro bump I was looking for a thread like this but it never showed up in the "search"

Quick note pad: dry erase marker on the windshield. Also suitable for writing down street directions so you don't have to take your eyes off the road.

If you're using tie wire and don't have a dispenser wrap it with duct tape (or black) before you crack it open, pull from the inside and you never have to worry about a mess.
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Old 09-02-2019, 11:51 PM   #526
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When cutting or drilling aluminum, give your blades or bits a quick shot of WD-40. Stops the aluminum from gumming things up. Lasts for many holes/cuts, re-apply as needed.
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Old 09-03-2019, 01:19 PM   #527
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When pulling control circuits. We use 5 or 6 different colors wires and group them together with phasing tape. If you had to number each one it would take forever.
Wire #’s are essential, period. Even if a print is not available later on at least the wire #is a big help when troubleshooting.
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Old 09-03-2019, 07:47 PM   #528
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For small job TI's -- I'm usually in a super rush... so I'll run two full boats in 3/4" EMT back near the panel -- stranded #12 and solid #12.

This makes each circuit conductor unique.

&&&

The floors are usually cut up for the plumber -- so a scissor lift just doesn't have any range of motion.

So I'll string together scaffolds -- 6' + 6' -- so as to have a poor man's 12-foot run.

The soft lid is only going to run at 9' ( 10' tin studs ) -- so it's easy to run the work above the grid.

For small TI s this gambit beats renting scissor lifts going away.

They just don't need that much height... and plumbers take forever to close up the slab.

&&&

I'm also a big fan of shop prepped Sealtite for underslab runs. The materials expense is much greater than PVC -- but I can unroll Sealtite in no time flat -- with the conductors already installed. (Rotosplit can trim the Sealtite with the conductors already installed.) This gambit keeps me off my knees as much as possible.

( ENT gets shot down by my AHJ. )
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Old 12-01-2019, 05:33 PM   #529
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On all of my hole saw arbors I wrap a piece of #12 solid at the base where the hole saw screws onto. Makes removing the hole saw from the arbor easier. The copper wire keeps the hole saw from binding up on the arbor.
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