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Old 01-23-2020, 08:28 AM   #21
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Load calculations are a form of fortune telling, machine shops are very tough to predict.

I would not disregard the customer's 25% and 50% estimates but I would throw out the numbers (which he just pulled out of his ass) and only look at the gist of it - he doesn't use much of his equipment simultaneously now, but he might use twice as much electricity if he gets twice as much space.

The machine shops I have dealt with occasionally get a big rush job or a deadline and they'll be using much more than usual, this is very hard to predict. Those are not situations where they can just turn off a couple machines, slow down and relax if they find out their service is undersized.

They'll also out of the blue buy a big machine that dramatically increases their load. There is a big secondary market, they might get something at auction they can't pass up that will open up new work for them. Or say they buy a waterjet, or buy a bigger waterjet. Some of those are 200hp. One local guy, rumor is he got a single contract that would basically pay for his waterjet.

Having the electrical capacity doesn't cost that much and when you look at it as opening up additional business opportunities it's well worth it. Go heavy.
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Last edited by splatz; 01-23-2020 at 08:57 AM.
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Old 01-23-2020, 08:48 AM   #22
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Depending on the rent, a 30 amp 120 V circuit might be good enough.
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Old 01-23-2020, 11:24 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by splatz View Post
Load calculations are a form of fortune telling, machine shops are very tough to predict.

I would not disregard the customer's 25% and 50% estimates but I would throw out the numbers (which he just pulled out of his ass) and only look at the gist of it - he doesn't use much of his equipment simultaneously now, but he might use twice as much electricity if he gets twice as much space.

The machine shops I have dealt with occasionally get a big rush job or a deadline and they'll be using much more than usual, this is very hard to predict. Those are not situations where they can just turn off a couple machines, slow down and relax if they find out their service is undersized.

They'll also out of the blue buy a big machine that dramatically increases their load. There is a big secondary market, they might get something at auction they can't pass up that will open up new work for them. Or say they buy a waterjet, or buy a bigger waterjet. Some of those are 200hp. One local guy, rumor is he got a single contract that would basically pay for his waterjet.

Having the electrical capacity doesn't cost that much and when you look at it as opening up additional business opportunities it's well worth it. Go heavy.
Talked with the guy yesterday, he is going to oversize for this reason.
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Old 01-23-2020, 05:21 PM   #24
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Here's how I would approach it:


If he moves into a building with more space and his business grows, 200A 240V may max out faster than he thinks, at which time trying to change to 400A will cost him a lot. If he gets a 400A service drop and doesn't use it for a few years, all he is out is the slightly higher cost of the 400A panel. The service cost shouldn't be any different, it's still only going to be based on his actual usage.
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Old 01-23-2020, 06:00 PM   #25
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Quote:
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Here's how I would approach it:


If he moves into a building with more space and his business grows, 200A 240V may max out faster than he thinks, at which time trying to change to 400A will cost him a lot. If he gets a 400A service drop and doesn't use it for a few years, all he is out is the slightly higher cost of the 400A panel. The service cost shouldn't be any different, it's still only going to be based on his actual usage.
I think from what I understand, the commercial/industrail realtors say, the cost per sq ft is a little more for more available power. But I agree with you
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