Single Phase 480V Transformer Grounding Question - Page 2 - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
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Old 02-24-2017, 08:14 PM   #21
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The primary circuit needs to ground the machine incase of a fault on the 240 volt side. That ground only connects to the case of the transformer. Connecting it to the X2-X3 bridge allows for the potential to energize the frame. The secondary side is grounded by grounding one of the H leads.
I hear you, thanks for your patience. The reason I did not initially follow your advice was because I was told by a worker at the electrical supply house that I definitely do not want to hook up the high voltage lead anywhere besides the terminals they go to and I must keep them separate.

Is there some other way to explain it so I can understand the flow of the possible fault current? I just don't understand how connecting one of the high voltage leads to the transformer case will help. I do now the original manual for the welder states the case of the welder must be grounded which I have done. Is is more like I need multiple ground connections because if someone is touching the case of the welder they will be a better path vs if they are touching the welder?

But I do now see how the 240 side isn't connected properly. I will post new pics tomorrow.
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Old 02-24-2017, 10:38 PM   #22
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I hear you, thanks for your patience. The reason I did not initially follow your advice was because I was told by a worker at the electrical supply house that I definitely do not want to hook up the high voltage lead anywhere besides the terminals they go to and I must keep them separate.

Is there some other way to explain it so I can understand the flow of the possible fault current? I just don't understand how connecting one of the high voltage leads to the transformer case will help. I do now the original manual for the welder states the case of the welder must be grounded which I have done. Is is more like I need multiple ground connections because if someone is touching the case of the welder they will be a better path vs if they are touching the welder?

But I do now see how the 240 side isn't connected properly. I will post new pics tomorrow.
On the 240 volt side, fault current will flow from a primary hot to the case and back to the service neutral on the green ground wire. But the secondary is generated with no electrical connection to the primary so there is no complete circuit for a fault to flow through unless you make one of the high voltage leads grounded.

Never listen to the guy at the supply house.
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