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Old 11-09-2018, 05:45 PM   #1
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Default HVAC question - pulling refrigerant into compressor for service.

Maybe someone here has done this.

I have to remove my A coil for service and planned on using the compressor on my heat pump to "suck" the refrigerant into it and close the valves to hold it there.

Pretty straightforward in AC mode.

I plan on doing just that - run the heat pump in AC mode to accomplish this. Kicker is that the ambient temp will be around freezing. Normally the unit would be in heat mode.

I can't think of an issue, as I won't be trying to transfer any heat, just pumping refrigerant. Just want to make sure I am not overlooking anything.

Thanks
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Old 11-09-2018, 06:11 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acro View Post
Maybe someone here has done this.

I have to remove my A coil for service and planned on using the compressor on my heat pump to "suck" the refrigerant into it and close the valves to hold it there.

Pretty straightforward in AC mode.

I plan on doing just that - run the heat pump in AC mode to accomplish this. Kicker is that the ambient temp will be around freezing. Normally the unit would be in heat mode.

I can't think of an issue, as I won't be trying to transfer any heat, just pumping refrigerant. Just want to make sure I am not overlooking anything.

Thanks
Maybe @MechanicalDVR will chime in or you might pm him.
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Old 11-09-2018, 06:51 PM   #3
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Put one of those small one man tents over top of the condensor. That'll get the temps right.
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Old 11-09-2018, 07:34 PM   #4
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Don't expect your heat pump to pull enough vacuum.
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Old 11-09-2018, 07:43 PM   #5
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Less than an ac unit?

Not expecting a vacuum, per se. Just suck the low side down to 5 or 10 psi is the most I am hoping for. Recover the slight residual, then remove the A coil.

Majority of the current refrigerant charge will be held in the compressor until I re-install the A coil.

Last edited by acro; 11-09-2018 at 07:48 PM.
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Old 11-09-2018, 09:15 PM   #6
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I dont know much about AC but how would you remove the none condensable's (moisture) from the new coils. Normally you would recover then after working on the system you would vacuum the system to remove non condensable and trash then refill the system.
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Old 11-09-2018, 09:55 PM   #7
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Good observation - it has to do with the way the service valves are configured. When shut, they isolate the ports and lineset from compressor. I will be able to vacuum the lineset and check for leaks before I open the valves to release the refrigerant from the compressor back into the lineset.
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Old 11-09-2018, 10:24 PM   #8
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you are on the right track. It's called pumping it down. You will still need a vacuum pump to properly service it . a set of gauges would also be nice.
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