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Old 07-10-2018, 03:19 PM   #1
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Default 120 vs 277 twist lock plugs

I was wondering out of curiousity what the difference between a 120v 20a twist lock and a 277v 20a twist lock would be... and could you use one for the other if necessary? Since the amperage is the same wouldn’t the terminals be as well?🤔
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Old 07-10-2018, 03:43 PM   #2
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Use the 120V receptacle for 277V and let me know how that goes when someone plugs in a 120V applicance.
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Old 07-10-2018, 04:09 PM   #3
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I assume you work in a plant? What you are describing is very dangerous and should not be done. Would it work-- sure if you matched both ends but there is a reason devices are rated at the various voltages.

Please don't think about doing this to save a few dollars.
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Old 07-10-2018, 06:20 PM   #4
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Lol I said twist lock plug, they are identical in design silly. It’s not a normal outlet. I don’t plan on saving a few bucks by doing this I’m just curious in the difference in design since I’ve used both of them many times on many different projects and they seem identical. It’s easy to know with differences in current, where as a high voltage wire can be super thin such as in some ballasts.
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Old 07-10-2018, 06:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsTheGator View Post
Lol I said twist lock plug, they are identical in design silly. Itís not a normal outlet. I donít plan on saving a few bucks by doing this Iím just curious in the difference in design since Iíve used both of them many times on many different projects and they seem identical. Itís easy to know with differences in current, where as a high voltage wire can be super thin such as in some ballasts.
they are different as one pin has a angle facing in and the other has the angle facing out to stop people putting them in the wrong receptacles
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Old 07-10-2018, 06:33 PM   #6
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Look at a 520 R and a 720 R on a Nema chart. The 720-Ris a 277v 20 amp locking receptacle and the 520-R is a 125V locking receptacle. They are not the same

https://www.webberelectronics.com/in...ing-nema-chart
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Old 07-10-2018, 07:35 PM   #7
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Ok you right my mistake, now that you mention it I recall them having different ground connections... ‘same’ was a poor word choice, my point was that it’s not a regular recept that someone is going to be plugging their phone charger to. So does anyone know the answer to my question or naw? I just want to know the difference in how they are made.
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Old 07-10-2018, 07:56 PM   #8
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They would be tested to approximately the same specifications so from an electrical point of view they are identical. But plugging a 120 V piece of equipment into a 277 V receptacle or vice versa is a very bad thing so mechanically they are made to prevent you from doing just that. There might be a slightly lower testing specification for the 120 V plug but I seriously doubt you are doing anything more than splitting hairs. When it comes to wiring for instance everything will be rated either 300 or 600 V although 300 V wiring is actually pretty rare to find (no significant cost savings).
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Old 07-10-2018, 08:08 PM   #9
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Either receptacle and plug would very likely handle 1000 volts, maybe more.

The reason they have different pin configurations is to prevent them from being interchanged.

Yes, you could apply 277 to the 120 version and it'd work perfectly fine.......until someone saw '20 amps 120 volts' on the receptacle and connected lets say, a ballast for 120 and.......
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Old 07-10-2018, 10:07 PM   #10
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The problem is not phone chargers but equipment that may be rated 120 v and has a twist lock cord on it. The female part now has 277v so you can see the issue. Maybe not likely to happen but it can
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Old 07-10-2018, 10:28 PM   #11
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We put 277v twistlock receps on some of our dairy customers 120v lighting circuits. The cord ends on the light fixtures are standardized 277v L7-15P and they have 120-277v ballasts/drivers in them. So the customers light fixtures will work in several different areas around the farm that have either 120v or 277v lighting circuits.


Just don't ever go backwards and put 120v twistlocks on 277v circuits. Common sense should tell you that.
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Old 07-10-2018, 10:37 PM   #12
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I have often wondered the same thing. I fully understand the reason for the different nema configurations and will never try to get around that. But I have always wondered about the difference. Even the difference in a resi grade recep and a 20 amp duplex. They seem to have the plug in and pull out force, they corrode and burn up at the same rate in nasty environments. I have a hard time justifying the cost for commercial devices in most applications.
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Old 07-11-2018, 01:03 AM   #13
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Convention contractors do it everyday.
Cords are for what ever voltage you need to run thru it.
Just label the voltage 277/480 or whatever & were good to go.
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