16 AWG wire ampacity at higher temperatures - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
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Old 10-12-2016, 02:54 PM   #1
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Default 16 AWG wire ampacity at higher temperatures

Hi,

I would like to use a particular 16 AWG copper wire with a PTFE jacket. It is stranded, with (19) 29 AWG strands.

Its specs say that it is rated for temperatures up to 200 deg C. This temperature rating is good enough for the heated area where I hope to use this wire, but I want to make sure that it also has the required ampacity for my application.

My maximum current draw on any single wire would be 5.625 amps. Can anyone tell me where I can find a table that shows the ampacity for 16 AWG wire with an explanation as to whether I have to adjust the rating for my higher temperatures?

Also, will the ampacity of all 16 AWG wire be the same at a particular temperature? Or is some 16 AWG (like the kind that is made for higher temperatures) made differently than others so that it can handle higher current?

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Paul
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Old 10-12-2016, 03:10 PM   #2
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You want hard engineering values.

Contact the manufacturers.

All of the Big Boys crank this stuff out right along with THWN and all the rest.

Just call up their tech desk. Those guys get lonely if you don't call.
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Old 10-12-2016, 03:25 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Kraemer View Post
Hi,

I would like to use a particular 16 AWG copper wire with a PTFE jacket. It is stranded, with (19) 29 AWG strands.

Its specs say that it is rated for temperatures up to 200 deg C. This temperature rating is good enough for the heated area where I hope to use this wire, but I want to make sure that it also has the required ampacity for my application.

My maximum current draw on any single wire would be 5.625 amps. Can anyone tell me where I can find a table that shows the ampacity for 16 AWG wire with an explanation as to whether I have to adjust the rating for my higher temperatures?

Also, will the ampacity of all 16 AWG wire be the same at a particular temperature? Or is some 16 AWG (like the kind that is made for higher temperatures) made differently than others so that it can handle higher current?

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Paul
If you are wiring inside the machine you are under a different set of rules than the NEC which is what we mostly discuss here. If it's to a machine the NEC doesn't allow for power conductors to be that small. 14 awg is the smallest you can go.

In either case YOU DO HAVE TO DERATE for heat.

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Old 10-12-2016, 09:01 PM   #4
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The NEC provides for the use of #16 and #18 conductors in 240.4(D)(1)&(2). The adjustment and correction factors must be applied based on the conditions of use.
The overcurrent protection would have to be Class CC, J or T fuses as the section requires all other types of overcurrent devices to be specifically listed and marked for use with the smaller conductor size. I am not aware of any devices that are listed and marked for this use.
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Old 10-13-2016, 01:52 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
The NEC provides for the use of #16 and #18 conductors in 240.4(D)(1)&(2). The adjustment and correction factors must be applied based on the conditions of use.
The overcurrent protection would have to be Class CC, J or T fuses as the section requires all other types of overcurrent devices to be specifically listed and marked for use with the smaller conductor size. I am not aware of any devices that are listed and marked for this use.
Interesting. It wasn't in the shop code book wish Is old. It's highlighted in my code book though which means it wss a new addition in 2008. Shop consensus is that the yours of breakers or fuses listed for use with 16 and 18 gavge wire are the types you'd use in a control panel. Like the din rail mounted stuff.

Thanks for the correction Don_resqcapt19, it's appreciated.

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Old 10-13-2016, 05:41 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Kraemer View Post
Hi,

I would like to use a particular 16 AWG copper wire with a PTFE jacket. It is stranded, with (19) 29 AWG strands.

Its specs say that it is rated for temperatures up to 200 deg C. This temperature rating is good enough for the heated area where I hope to use this wire
Is 200 ˚C your ambient temp ?
, but I want to make sure that it also has the required ampacity for my application.

My maximum current draw on any single wire would be 5.625 amps. Can anyone tell me where I can find a table that shows the ampacity for 16 AWG wire
Again ... you need to know your ambient temp.
with an explanation as to whether I have to adjust the rating for my higher temperatures?
Of course !

Also, will the ampacity of all 16 AWG wire be the same at a particular temperature? Or is some 16 AWG (like the kind that is made for higher temperatures) made differently than others so that it can handle higher current?
16awg is 16awg ... different cable jackets withstand more heat

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Paul

As Telsa mentioned, the Mfr will have this info for you. You will need to give them your ambient temp to get an ampacity thou ...

It will also depend on where this wire will be going, as to whether or not your subject to NEC rules.
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