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Old 09-30-2017, 03:15 PM   #61
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Add 5/16" and you got the main nut drivers.
9/16" is good to have for working with strut and 3/8" rod if you do it often.

I carried a 10mm for German package equipment access panel bolts.

All depends on what you work on most.
I got a 9/16 nut driver a little over a year ago, now i don't know how i lived without it. I use it all the time for mounting panels to spring/cone nuts and building strut racks. If you work with 3/8 hardware a lot i highly recommend one
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Old 09-30-2017, 05:50 PM   #62
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I got a 9/16 nut driver a little over a year ago, now i don't know how i lived without it. I use it all the time for mounting panels to spring/cone nuts and building strut racks. If you work with 3/8 hardware a lot i highly recommend one
My 9/16" is so old it's a Stanley as they were the only brand making them I could find back then.

At the time I picked up that and a 5/8" which used to fit pump flange bolts.
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Old 09-30-2017, 06:17 PM   #63
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I spent 35 years in this trade and can say honestly you have more tools now, than I ever did.
Is your school in the tool business?
Don't know if I ever asked but what did you actually do, what type electrical work?
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Old 10-01-2017, 07:06 AM   #64
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Your basic solar MC4 connector tools.
those cost over $100. correct? I hope I never need those .
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Old 10-01-2017, 12:11 PM   #65
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First was the railroad. Union. They supplied me with all the tools I needed. A tool box. Snap On.
Second was high rise commercial (union) and I could get away with a screwdriver and a pair of side cutters. I did a lot of slab work. (I was young then).
Third was manufacturing that once again came with a full tool box and all associated testing instruments.
Personal tools were not allowed.

So I had many tools at my disposal and in my possession. I just never had to buy much out of pocket.
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Old 10-01-2017, 05:06 PM   #66
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Originally Posted by John Valdes View Post
First was the railroad. Union. They supplied me with all the tools I needed. A tool box. Snap On.
Second was high rise commercial (union) and I could get away with a screwdriver and a pair of side cutters. I did a lot of slab work. (I was young then).
Third was manufacturing that once again came with a full tool box and all associated testing instruments.
Personal tools were not allowed.

So I had many tools at my disposal and in my possession. I just never had to buy much out of pocket.
I knew you worked for the railroad, what did you actually work on for the railroad? Signals, third rail, cars? Just curious.

I did a little work on Albatross rail car a/c (heat pumps) for a while.
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Old 10-02-2017, 12:25 PM   #67
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I knew you worked for the railroad, what did you actually work on for the railroad? Signals, third rail, cars? Just curious.

I did a little work on Albatross rail car a/c (heat pumps) for a while.
When I first started, I worked in the "car yard". Amtrak passenger cars. Lighting, generators, refrigeration and HVAC.
Each car had its own power system. Batteries. 36 volt, 72 volt and 120 volt DC if my memory is working. The purpose of the generator was to charge batteries at idle and power and charge in operation. Rolling.
The generator under the car is connected to the axles with the use a of a centrifugal clutch.
They also had standby power inlets to run generators when the car was idle.
This stuff was ancient. I think many of them were reconditioned Pullman equipment.
We did turn around and maintenance.
Spent many 8 hour OT shifts replacing these batteries. Was lots of fun but hard work.

I found my home in the diesel electric shop. We called it the "Big House". I really got into things there and was learning many things.
These were brand new GE Electromotive Division units. 3000 HP diesel, turning a giant alternator to rectifier to supply the 6 DC traction motors that moved the locomotive. I think they were 600 HP each? Or it might have been 600 hundred volt motors?
Boilers, DC and AC control. Also "train control" safety systems. Very interesting but very dirty. Its also been a very very long time.
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Old 10-02-2017, 02:54 PM   #68
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When I first started, I worked in the "car yard". Amtrak passenger cars. Lighting, generators, refrigeration and HVAC.
Each car had its own power system. Batteries. 36 volt, 72 volt and 120 volt DC if my memory is working. The purpose of the generator was to charge batteries at idle and power and charge in operation. Rolling.
The generator under the car is connected to the axles with the use a of a centrifugal clutch.
They also had standby power inlets to run generators when the car was idle.
This stuff was ancient. I think many of them were reconditioned Pullman equipment.
We did turn around and maintenance.
Spent many 8 hour OT shifts replacing these batteries. Was lots of fun but hard work.

I found my home in the diesel electric shop. We called it the "Big House". I really got into things there and was learning many things.
These were brand new GE Electromotive Division units. 3000 HP diesel, turning a giant alternator to rectifier to supply the 6 DC traction motors that moved the locomotive. I think they were 600 HP each? Or it might have been 600 hundred volt motors?
Boilers, DC and AC control. Also "train control" safety systems. Very interesting but very dirty. Its also been a very very long time.



It sounds like something that a young guy would love to do!

I thought it would all be interesting.
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Old 10-19-2017, 11:12 PM   #69
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Good info so far, pay attention, 2 channel locks, scratch awl, semi-sharp pocket knife, Lutz 2 in 1 pocket screwdriver. Semi sharp knife not as bad to cut lower part of thumb when stripping wire in a box. Lutz pocket screwdriver looks like a toy but it's a tool, carry one a while and you'll find so many uses for it home cannot be left without it.
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Old 10-19-2017, 11:22 PM   #70
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Welcome aboard @Pmack!

Enjoy the ride here.
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