Bath Exhaust Fan in Dropped Ceiling - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum > Electrical Forum > General Electrical Discussion


Like Tree10Likes
  • 3 Post By HackWork
  • 1 Post By tjb
  • 1 Post By splatz
  • 1 Post By daveEM
  • 1 Post By jelhill
  • 2 Post By HackWork
  • 1 Post By JoeSparky
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-23-2019, 09:59 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
A Little Short's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: US
Posts: 4,113
Rewards Points: 910
Default Bath Exhaust Fan in Dropped Ceiling

Trimming out a house and the customer wants a bath fan/can combo exhaust installed in the dropped ceiling in the basement bath. The mounts for the fan are made to install between the joists. What is the best way to install this on the ceiling tile and keep the weight off the tile and also keep it from moving when running?
Not that it matters much but this is a recessed can with a fan, not a standard bath fan.
__________________

A Little Short is offline   Reply With Quote
Join Contractor Talk

Join the #1 Electrician Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

ElectricianTalk.com - Are you a Professional Electrical Contractor? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's the leading place for electricians to meet online. No homeowners asking DIY questions. Just fellow tradesmen who enjoy talking about their business, their trade, and anything else that comes up. No matter what your specialty is you'll find that ElectricianTalk.com is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free!

Join ElectricianTalk.com - Click Here JOIN FOR FREE


Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ElectricianTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-23-2019, 10:02 AM   #2
Mensa Player
 
HackWork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: -
Posts: 34,239
Rewards Points: 1,647
Default

In similar situations I have cut a piece of 1/2" plywood to lay on top of the tile. That will displace the weight of the fan to the grid instead of it pushing down in the middle of the tile. The weight of the plywood will also help keep the fan from moving. You can drive some small screws thru the vertical part of the grid into the edge of the plywood if you want it more rigid.
tmessner, splatz and Bird dog like this.
HackWork is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to HackWork For This Useful Post:
A Little Short (01-23-2019)
Old 01-23-2019, 10:07 AM   #3
tjb
Cool Kid
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 614
Rewards Points: 363
Default

Outhouse.
99cents likes this.
tjb is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-23-2019, 10:24 AM   #4
Hackenschmidt
 
splatz's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 8,698
Rewards Points: 42
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HackWork View Post
In similar situations I have cut a piece of 1/2" plywood to lay on top of the tile. That will displace the weight of the fan to the grid instead of it pushing down in the middle of the tile. The weight of the plywood will also help keep the fan from moving. You can drive some small screws thru the vertical part of the grid into the edge of the plywood if you want it more rigid.
This is so much easier than dicking around with various stamped sheet metal contraptions.
jelhill likes this.
__________________
Everything Should Be Made as Simple as Possible, But Not Simpler
splatz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2019, 01:01 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
CoolWill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: SC
Posts: 2,405
Rewards Points: 3,096
Default

Tie wire 1/2" EMT to the grid. Use peanut crews and two hole straps.
CoolWill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2019, 01:07 PM   #6
Can't sign em..forget em
 
lighterup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 7,437
Rewards Points: 10,198
Default

I think he's using the Halo 6" recess can light / exhaust fan
combo (or some similar product).
It should have expandable brackets like a recess can has
(but a tad thicker)...spread em out and use self tapping
screws to secure the ends of the brackets to the steel grid.
lighterup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2019, 06:40 PM   #7
:-)
 
daveEM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Alberta
Posts: 3,670
Rewards Points: 2,382
Default

T-bar is probably 1 or maybe 2 max off the joists. Put the fan between the joists as usual butt up against one (toss the brackets). Drop the can level to the finished ceiling and Drive a couple of screws thru the can and presto the can is firm against the joist.
eddy current likes this.
__________________
<<
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


I like perfect.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
daveEM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2019, 11:04 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
A Little Short's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: US
Posts: 4,113
Rewards Points: 910
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lighterup View Post
I think he's using the Halo 6" recess can light / exhaust fan
combo (or some similar product).
It should have expandable brackets like a recess can has
(but a tad thicker)...spread em out and use self tapping
screws to secure the ends of the brackets to the steel grid.

I think (can't remember for sure) that the brackets are too high up on the fan body to line up with the T-bar
If you run screws through the T-bar they will stick out on the other side and won't let the tile fit in.




Quote:
Originally Posted by daveEM View Post
T-bar is probably 1 or maybe 2 max off the joists. Put the fan between the joists as usual butt up against one (toss the brackets). Drop the can level to the finished ceiling and Drive a couple of screws thru the can and presto the can is firm against the joist.

The joists are way too high above the grid for that to work.
__________________

A Little Short is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2019, 04:02 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
DashDingo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 125
Rewards Points: 20
Default

Get creative, your an electrician. Maybe what you end up doing will end up on the “ Gems of the trade” thread.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
DashDingo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2019, 08:16 AM   #10
Sentimental Mental
 
CTshockhazard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: CT
Posts: 995
Rewards Points: 1,474
Default Erico 512HD

I've done the fabri-cobbling, now I usually just pick up a couple of these:


__________________
.
__________________________________________________

Just to be absolutely clear...
I didn't say anything about nothing to nobody.
CTshockhazard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2019, 08:41 AM   #11
Elderly Member
 
jelhill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: The Volunteer State
Posts: 549
Rewards Points: 1,090
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by splatz View Post
This is so much easier than dicking around with various stamped sheet metal contraptions.

Just installed 2 fan/light units in a drop ceiling about 2 weeks ago using the same method that Hack mentioned but added a couple of extra guy wires from the T-Bar up to the joists to be safe. I'm like @splatz, trying to use the various metal t-bar brackets is a pain in the Butt.
splatz likes this.
__________________
....
jelhill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2019, 09:10 AM   #12
Old Grumpy Bastard
 
MechanicalDVR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Old Dominion"
Posts: 59,781
Rewards Points: 1,974
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jelhill View Post
Just installed 2 fan/light units in a drop ceiling about 2 weeks ago using the same method that Hack mentioned but added a couple of extra guy wires from the T-Bar up to the joists to be safe. I'm like @splatz, trying to use the various metal t-bar brackets is a pain in the Butt.
I've always used the plywood and additional support wire method with good results.
__________________
I'm as Christian as possible in the times we live in.

Always just a stallion in a china shop
MechanicalDVR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2019, 12:24 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
sbrn33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: middle america
Posts: 11,497
Rewards Points: 3,396
Default

I normally cut a couple 2x4's to fit in between the grid and screw to them. Kinda like hax's method without the extra labor of cutting a big hole. If I am worried I will secure therm with baling wire.
sbrn33 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2019, 12:44 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
jw0445's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Kirkwood, Pa.
Posts: 1,186
Rewards Points: 1,746
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sbrn33 View Post
I normally cut a couple 2x4's to fit in between the grid and screw to them. Kinda like hax's method without the extra labor of cutting a big hole. If I am worried I will secure therm with baling wire.


And cut a kerf on both ends so the 2x4's sit over the grid
jw0445 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2019, 12:59 PM   #15
Mensa Player
 
HackWork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: -
Posts: 34,239
Rewards Points: 1,647
Default

You’re going to use a hole saw to cut the hole in the ceiling tile, so drill the hole in the plywood at the same time.
electricguy and MechanicalDVR like this.
HackWork is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to HackWork For This Useful Post:
MechanicalDVR (01-24-2019)
Old 01-24-2019, 08:21 PM   #16
German Spy
 
Helmut's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: THE United States Of America
Posts: 3,613
Rewards Points: 3,911
Default

Jack chain to supports work.

Plywood/drywall works better.
__________________
I see nooothing, I was not here.
I did not even get up this morning.
Helmut is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2019, 08:32 PM   #17
Old Grumpy Bastard
 
MechanicalDVR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Old Dominion"
Posts: 59,781
Rewards Points: 1,974
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sbrn33 View Post
I normally cut a couple 2x4's to fit in between the grid and screw to them. Kinda like hax's method without the extra labor of cutting a big hole. If I am worried I will secure therm with baling wire.
If it's being inspected you can't support it off the grid, especially in places with seismic code concerns.
__________________
I'm as Christian as possible in the times we live in.

Always just a stallion in a china shop
MechanicalDVR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2019, 10:21 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NH
Posts: 756
Rewards Points: 1,451
Default

2 scraps of lumber 23.75" long. Cut hole in tile. Screw Fan to lumber and lumber to grid. Tie wire or jack chain the exhaust fan to the physical ceiling.
sbrn33 likes this.
JoeSparky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2019, 08:23 PM   #19
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Mid Atlantic
Posts: 17
Rewards Points: 2
Default

Just did a few in some condo bathrooms. The Panasonic's I usually use have a bracket that extends out to 24 inches. Screw the fan housing to that through the ceiling tile and then tie off to the deck like a lay in fixture.

Sent from my SM-S327VL using Tapatalk
wmbettsjr is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Supporting above Drop ceiling TAGallagher Commercial Electrical Forum 32 01-13-2019 06:06 PM
Bath Exhaust fan electricguy General Electrical Discussion 4 04-01-2018 11:04 AM
Who should install ceiling medallions? Canaduh Residential Electrical Forum 37 03-29-2017 06:04 AM
Replacement Bath fans ...no patching? Greg Sparkovich Residential Electrical Forum 29 10-12-2016 08:21 AM
bath exhaust papaotis Residential Electrical Forum 2 03-31-2016 07:25 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com