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-   -   Buck Boost transformer (https://www.electriciantalk.com/f2/buck-boost-transformer-264520/)

RedneckRodshop 08-21-2018 03:11 PM

Buck Boost transformer
 
New to this forum, been retired and out of the tool pouch for several years.
Back in the day, we would use a buck boost transformer, wired for 220v input, and get 120v out. We would use this when we were working in Europe to get 120v out of their 220v system, although the tools would run a little slow due to the 50 hz rather than our 60hz.
If memory serves, we used something similar to a 120/240 input, 12/24v output buck boost. The wiring diagram is what is missing. Do I wire the 220 to the input, and the 120 to the 120 input taps, and just isolate and cap the 12/24 leads?
Thanks in advance for your help!

frenchelectrican 08-21-2018 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RedneckRodshop (Post 5066486)
New to this forum, been retired and out of the tool pouch for several years.
Back in the day, we would use a buck boost transformer, wired for 220v input, and get 120v out. We would use this when we were working in Europe to get 120v out of their 220v system, although the tools would run a little slow due to the 50 hz rather than our 60hz.
If memory serves, we used something similar to a 120/240 input, 12/24v output buck boost. The wiring diagram is what is missing. Do I wire the 220 to the input, and the 120 to the 120 input taps, and just isolate and cap the 12/24 leads?
Thanks in advance for your help!

Just stop right there and get a electrician to help you on this one if you need the buck/boost transformer.

there is too many different way to do this. ( there is about 10 different way of connections afaik depending on the model of buck/boost transformer. )

and please fill your profile to help us give you a correct way to deal with it.

brian john 08-21-2018 03:59 PM

Generally, Buck-Boost are for small voltage changes 12/24/32 volts up or down when you go from 120 to 240/277/480 the amount of steel and wire utilized to make a large change transformer as a buck-boost is not cost effective.

Google Hevi Duty Transformers for the countless wiring diagrams.

RedneckRodshop 08-21-2018 06:27 PM

I have used a three phase motor as phase generator, wired from a single phase supply, to generate the third phase for another three phase motor. I assumed that I could use both sets of transformer input lugs, and the 220v lugs would cause 120v to be present on their respective terminals. Not sure what to do with the 12/24 leads though. And please do not insult me by saying it can't be done, as I have done it on numerous occasions, but for the life of me cannot remember the wiring sequence.

brian john 08-21-2018 07:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RedneckRodshop (Post 5066570)
I have used a three phase motor as phase generator, wired from a single phase supply, to generate the third phase for another three phase motor. I assumed that I could use both sets of transformer input lugs, and the 220v lugs would cause 120v to be present on their respective terminals. Not sure what to do with the 12/24 leads though. And please do not insult me by saying it can't be done, as I have done it on numerous occasions, but for the life of me cannot remember the wiring sequence.

What voltage do you have available and what voltage do you want?

To get 220 VAC from 120 VAC a Buck-Boost is not available on the marker, and bother telling me what you have done or not done, because I could care less.

I am telling you what is available off the shelf.

You are not even sure what to do with the 12/24 volt leads and those are what are give you the boost or buck.

Now if you boosted 120 to 134 with a single buck-boost then boosted that again to
158 boosted that again to 182 then again to 206 than one last time to23.

You have it.

Google buck-boost and see what is available, see how they work, see why in a practical sense boosting 120 to 220 is NOT PRACTICAL with a buck-boost.

As for the motor trick that is an old method woodworkers have used for years that will work if you can get the motor running but is very inefficient.

telsa 08-21-2018 09:02 PM

Absolutely NO-ONE has ever used a buck-boost transformer to transition from 220VAC down to 120VAC.

A straight up transformer would be used... every time.

John Valdes 08-21-2018 09:23 PM

Welcome to Electrician Talk.
Please take a few minutes and fill out your profile.

brian john 08-22-2018 03:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by telsa (Post 5066696)
Absolutely NO-ONE has ever used a buck-boost transformer to transition from 220VAC down to 120VAC.

A straight up transformer would be used... every time.

No electrician or electrical engineer would in the field


SOME UPS manufactures use buck-boost in their UPS to go from 480 to 208/120, I have never been able to figure out why and no tech in the field can tell me.

RedneckRodshop 08-23-2018 01:14 PM

Ok, I was mistaken. It was NOT a buck boost transformer we used, but rather a small step down. Guess I have been away from it for too long.
I apologize if I hurt anyone's feelings.

telsa 08-23-2018 02:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brian john (Post 5067084)
No electrician or electrical engineer would in the field


SOME UPS manufactures use buck-boost in their UPS to go from 480 to 208/120, I have never been able to figure out why and no tech in the field can tell me.

Now that IS astounding. :surprise:

brian john 08-23-2018 03:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by telsa (Post 5067710)
Now that IS astounding. :surprise:

I have NO CLUE what the savings are or the reason for this setup.

gpop 08-23-2018 06:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RedneckRodshop (Post 5067698)
Ok, I was mistaken. It was NOT a buck boost transformer we used, but rather a small step down. Guess I have been away from it for too long.
I apologize if I hurt anyone's feelings.

That makes more sense. I have seen many homes near the American air force bases wired with both Uk 240 and additional USA 120 receptacles that are using a step down transformers.

gpop 08-23-2018 06:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brian john (Post 5067732)
I have NO CLUE what the savings are or the reason for this setup.


Its a cheap way to make a avr (automatic voltage regulator) on the incoming side of the ups.

dmxtothemax 08-23-2018 08:08 PM

240 to 120v transformers are readily available now days,
What are you wanting to power,
and what is it's power requirements ?


:glasses:


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