Building a new house - Page 2 - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum > Electrical Forum > General Electrical Discussion


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-21-2015, 11:12 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Northern Maine
Posts: 158
Rewards Points: 265
Default

Super-insulate. at least R30 in walls and R60 in ceilings. Can lights into an unfinished space are killers for a tight house. I think cooper makes surface mount LED that looks like a can but fits into a standard octagon box. Look into ROXUL for insulation, worlds ahead of fiberglass in all ways.

Anything w/o a dry contact on the line side will consume electricity 24/7 and will also be subject to failure in a surge (install surge protection as well). GFCI as much as you can, kiddos are much safer with GFCI.

I built my own home in 2009, from clearing the land to finish work. The only thing I hired out was mudding the drywall. I will never pour concrete again though. 320A must be a local thing, I've never seen anything over a 200A resi service.

I am a huge fan of solid fuelled (wood coal pellet) boilers and have installed several including one in my own home. I heat 3200 square feet (includes workshop and garage) for less than $800/ year in a climate where $4-5K in the norm.

I can elaborate if you'd like.

TWN
TheWireNut is offline   Reply With Quote
Join Contractor Talk

Join the #1 Electrician Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

ElectricianTalk.com - Are you a Professional Electrical Contractor? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's the leading place for electricians to meet online. No homeowners asking DIY questions. Just fellow tradesmen who enjoy talking about their business, their trade, and anything else that comes up. No matter what your specialty is you'll find that ElectricianTalk.com is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free!

Join ElectricianTalk.com - Click Here JOIN FOR FREE


Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ElectricianTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-21-2015, 11:15 AM   #22
I own stock in FotoMat!
 
480sparky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cornpatch USA
Posts: 39,118
Rewards Points: 6,520
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWireNut View Post
..... 320A must be a local thing, I've never seen anything over a 200A resi service............

400a resi services are getting more common these days. Especially with large customs. 320a is 80% of 400. So some refer to a 400a service as 320.
__________________
I'm 480Sparky, and I approved this message.
480sparky is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to 480sparky For This Useful Post:
TheWireNut (02-21-2015)
Old 02-21-2015, 11:18 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: IL
Posts: 3,838
Rewards Points: 1,224
Default

If I was building new, I would avoid trusses as much as possible...failure under fire condition of about 5 minutes and would at about $5k for a residential fire sprinkler system.
don_resqcapt19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-21-2015, 11:36 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Pittsburgh, PA.
Posts: 1,543
Rewards Points: 3,078
Default

Central Vacuum system.
I installed a central vacuum system 20 some years ago. It was a great decision. People that don't like them, probably have a Nutone. Beam is the original manufacturer of central vacs. They were bought by Eureka several years ago but still have a superior quality. You can rough it in for a couple of hundred, then buy the unit later.

http://ironaway.com/ironing-centers

High basement walls - That way, eventually, you'll have no bulkheads in the game room or finished basement.

Form a Drain for the footer.
__________________
Greg
3DDesign is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 11:54 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Northern Maine
Posts: 158
Rewards Points: 265
Default

Central vac sucks! Well that's a good thing in this case.
TheWireNut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 12:05 PM   #26
Lep
THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
 
Lep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Angel Island Ca
Posts: 3,415
Rewards Points: 2,927
Default

Who's doing the Building pad and site grading? Go with drought tolerant landscaping (that doesn't necessarily mean you have to put in all rocks) that way you don't have to mow the lawn all the time.Hopefully enough room for nice raised bed vegetable gardens.

gas appliances, dryer
attic vent fan
__________________
"See the ball; Hit the ball."
Pete Rose:Joe Morgan
Lep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 12:08 PM   #27
Electrical Contractor
 
wendon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Wisconsiberia
Posts: 9,327
Rewards Points: 54
Default

Personally I'd go with:
Basement
ICF basement. If you're going to use TGI's etc., add an extra row of blocks
so you have room for your duct work to run under the joist

Floor trusses are fine, but good luck with having all the chases match the duct work with a plumber dropping a toilet flange in the middle of one.
You'll also notice more movement of the floor when you walk on it.

Heating system
I'd go with a high efficiency furnace connected to a heat pump.
Hydronic heating in the basement and garage floor with a modulating
LP boiler or electric. Most homes I do, install heat in the basement floor
but I suspect once the house heats up it runs very little. Staple up tubing on separate zones if you want heat to bath floors etc. Be sure to install Wifi thermostats too. A wood pellet stove or at least a gas fireplace is a nice feature.

Insulation
If you have the money in your budget, spray all the rim joists with ridged foam. Spray all the exterior walls with at least an inch of rigid foam and then install whatever type you prefer in the remaining space. If you want a real tight house, have them spray a skin of foam in the attic after the sheetrock is up. Good quality doors and windows are a must!

Electrical
If you're going with a large electric boiler, or some type of a heat storage unit, you might want to upsize the service. Otherwise 200 amps should handle it if you're going to be using LED lighting. Make sure you use panels with the PO neutral option for the AFCI's. I would definitely look into some type of a lighting system. Lutron has several options. Especially in the kitchen or areas where you'll end up with a lot of switches in one spot. There's also the capability of controlling lights while you're on vacation.
I'm installing more and more LED lighting and the options are increasing all the time. I like recessed lighting with LED inserts but you have to plan for plenty of them. Don't install a bath fan\light combo. Use separate fixtures.
Stair tread lights, exterior lights, deck lighting, accent lighting, cabinet lighting, under-counter lighting, motion sensors, and a host of other options are some things to be taken into consideration. And don't forget chases for septic wiring, well wiring, etc.

LV
I'm running less and less Cat5 in homes. A number of people are
going away from landlines. They'll ask for a couple lines to the office and maybe one to a central spot for a cordless phone. At one of the big homes we did last year, they had a separate contractor run Cat5 all over the house to possible TV locations etc. The wires are still there because the satellite company came in and installed wireless. Best to figure out what you want before building!

Siding
I prefer as low maintenance as possible. I'd probably go with Smart siding or something like that.

Roof
The sky's the limit. At least a good quality asphalt shingle. I never see them install the three tabs anymore.
__________________
Saving the world, one backstabbed receptacle at a time.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
wendon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 12:15 PM   #28
Junior Member
 
amishman Elec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Ohio
Posts: 22
Rewards Points: 44
Default

Knauer...
It looks like we've tripled your budget by now. Enjoy the process.
amishman Elec is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to amishman Elec For This Useful Post:
chicken steve (02-21-2015), CTshockhazard (02-22-2015), shocksystems (02-22-2015), TheWireNut (02-21-2015)
Old 02-21-2015, 12:16 PM   #29
Electrical Contractor
 
wendon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Wisconsiberia
Posts: 9,327
Rewards Points: 54
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lep View Post
Who's doing the Building pad and site grading? Go with drought tolerant landscaping (that doesn't necessarily mean you have to put in all rocks) that way you don't have to mow the lawn all the time.Hopefully enough room for nice raised bed vegetable gardens.

gas appliances, dryer
attic vent fan
Just curious Lep, what's this drought thing you talk about???
__________________
Saving the world, one backstabbed receptacle at a time.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
wendon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 12:21 PM   #30
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 15,674
Rewards Points: 804
Default

Quickest way to end a marriage is to build a house. Good luck.
Chris1971 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 01:24 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 196
Rewards Points: 83
Default

What's wrong with forced air? All I see installed these days is geothermal or natural gas forced air.

I have over 150 cans scheduled for the house, I like lots of light and cans are super cheap.

Never worked with icf foundations, but sounds like a good idea.

Central vac is out of the question the wife loves her dyson and I don't get a say in that.

320a vs 200a is about $600 for me is rather have the extra space. Garage is 30x58 and I plan on finishing the basement so total size for house will be 4200 sq ft ish.

Back up gen prep is a good idea.
Wiring for future pool and hot tub is already planned.

I have a ton of wireless stuff in the house now and hate how it's a cluster f&$8, is like as much as possible hard wired.

I like the led tape strips under the trim, do you have any pics or can you explain how this is done?

Is in floor heating worth it, I need to figure out a heat source for the large garage; in floor, gas, or mini split w/ac.

Roofing I'm debating 4tab vs metal roofing if I can afford it.

I put the house to bid with a couple builders and came up at 317-340 with their 10-18% fees.

Do floor trusses really burn faster than tjis?

For attic to basement chases would 1-1/4 emt save me on the fire hazzard as opposed to ent or pvc? I'll use fire caulk and foam to seal around the penetrations and throw some duct seal in the pipe around the wiring.
Knauer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 01:24 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: IL
Posts: 3,838
Rewards Points: 1,224
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3DDesign View Post
Central Vacuum system.
I installed a central vacuum system 20 some years ago. It was a great decision. People that don't like them, probably have a Nutone. Beam is the original manufacturer of central vacs. They were bought by Eureka several years ago but still have a superior quality. You can rough it in for a couple of hundred, then buy the unit later.
...
I have a nutone central vac and it works fine. When the power unit died, I replaced it with a standard shop vac. About 1/4 of the cost and as much or more vacuum that the units designed for central vacs.
don_resqcapt19 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to don_resqcapt19 For This Useful Post:
chicken steve (02-21-2015), samgregger (02-21-2015)
Old 02-21-2015, 01:31 PM   #33
Retired Account
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: the Green Mountain state
Posts: 39,722
Rewards Points: 14,650
Default

My shack's central vac is a dewalt wet/dry vac made to a lotta left over 2" sch 40, which makes right onto nutone ports

~CS~
chicken steve is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to chicken steve For This Useful Post:
shocksystems (02-22-2015)
Old 02-21-2015, 01:31 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 196
Rewards Points: 83
Default

Here is the first floor plan. Have since added to the garage and made bed2/3 slightly bigger.



Building a new house-image-3185434662.jpg
Knauer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 01:41 PM   #35
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 196
Rewards Points: 83
Default

Also what do people do for alarm systems these days? I wanted the motion sensing Vulcan cannon mounted on the garage, but I think it's out of budget and might get a little loud.

Seriously tho any ideas on alarm systems I'd like to do the install myself if possible and just pay a monitoring fee.

Also added a dog shower in the garage, it's a pain in the rear to try to get two 120lbs German Shepard into a bathroom tub.
Knauer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 01:55 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
five.five-six's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: So Cal
Posts: 6,957
Rewards Points: 10,220
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knauer View Post
Also what do people do for alarm systems these days? I wanted the motion sensing Vulcan cannon mounted on the garage, but I think it's out of budget and might get a little loud.
you can't do that, it's called a spring gun
Quote:



Seriously tho any ideas on alarm systems I'd like to do the install myself if possible and just pay a monitoring fee.

Also added a dog shower in the garage, it's a pain in the rear to try to get two 120lbs German Shepard into a bathroom tub.
Honeywell vista series is the current gold standard. Do you want one of those cool touch screens you can turn lights on and off with (tuxedo touch) or just an alarm keypad?

If you are going to do intrusion, prewire and drill your windows and doors so you don't have those stupid stick on battery powered piles of junk everywhere. You probably want to get some help from someone that's done it before because you can seriously eff' up a window if you don't fully think it through before you start drilling. Install and test all your door/window sensors before drywall.

For monitoring, go with alarmgrid.com There are slightly cheaper alternatives, but I don't think you can get better, friendlier, more helpful support. Once you get the comm up, they will program the whole alarm for you free.
__________________
Liberal Paradise would be a place where everybody has guaranteed employment, free comprehensive healthcare, free education, free food, free housing, free clothing, free utilities, and only authorities have guns. We have such a place. It's called prison.
five.five-six is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 02:16 PM   #37
Senior Member
 
Vintage Sounds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Posts: 3,259
Rewards Points: 4,004
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knauer View Post
What's wrong with forced air? All I see installed these days is geothermal or natural gas forced air.

Never worked with icf foundations, but sounds like a good idea.

Is in floor heating worth it, I need to figure out a heat source for the large garage; in floor, gas, or mini split w/ac.
Forced air is not bad, actually much better than it used to be now that there are 2-stage furnaces. The increasing popularity of radiant floor heat has swayed a lot of people's opinions which is why some are against forced air. Floor heat IS really nice, but it affects your choice of flooring(doesn't work well with carpet) and you will need a secondary source of air exchange and also a separate means to air condition the house. In the end that drives the total cost up.

I like high velocity because the ductwork is smaller, the pressurised ducts never need duct cleaning, the air mixes better and in air conditioning mode it removes humidity more effectively. With one of these systems you can also mix forced air and radiant which is convenient because if you're trying to heat a garage, floor heat would be the way to go. Trying to heat the air in a poorly insulated space would be a huge waste of energy.

ICFs make a good foundation, but they're even better when the entire outside wall above grade is made using them.
Vintage Sounds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 04:15 PM   #38
Senior Member
 
Service Call's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Daytona Beach
Posts: 1,912
Rewards Points: 32
Default

How about a spigot over the stove for the pasta cooker.
Service Call is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Service Call For This Useful Post:
CTshockhazard (02-22-2015)
Old 02-21-2015, 04:22 PM   #39
Senior Member
 
ponyboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: parts unknown
Posts: 8,051
Rewards Points: 709
Default

Batman symbol high powered spot light on roof. To call batman


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
__________________
Too dumb for New York, too ugly for LA
ponyboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 05:05 PM   #40
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 1,402
Rewards Points: 1,558
Default

I would do an 11 course basement. You'll wish you did if you ever decide to finish it.

The house that I'm in now has a concrete block wall instead of an I-beam. It divides the basement in half the long way nicely.
ralpha494 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Building a GC's house icdubois General Electrical Discussion 20 09-07-2014 10:54 AM
building addition on house NacBooster29 Off Topic (Non Trade) 21 04-26-2014 09:32 PM
I'm building a new house, any advice? TooFarFromFenway General Electrical Discussion 160 07-12-2012 09:30 PM
E-House / MCC Building mferguson PLCs, VFDs, Motors and Controls 11 12-22-2009 04:15 PM
What's the wildest thing you've found in an old building or house cobra50 Off Topic (Non Trade) 81 11-30-2009 11:20 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com