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Old 08-09-2017, 07:42 PM   #1
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Default can anyone explain what is neutral grounding devces and its using?

anyone knows it,
please give details and examples
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Old 08-09-2017, 07:44 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike883 View Post
anyone knows it,
please give details and examples
Did you read what you typed before you posted?
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Old 08-09-2017, 08:04 PM   #3
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A screw.

Or a piece of wire.
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Old 08-09-2017, 08:36 PM   #4
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Rules 10-1100 to 10-1108 of the Canadian Electrical Code provide rules on installing neutral grounding devices (grounding resistors) used for the purpose of controlling the ground fault current or the voltage-to-ground of an alternating current electrical system. ... the ground fault current is 10 amperes or less; and.Sep 16, 2006

http://iaeimagazine.org/magazine/200...00-to-10-1108/
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Old 08-09-2017, 09:07 PM   #5
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English translation please ?

Grammer check crashed !

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Old 08-09-2017, 09:40 PM   #6
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From the 2015 CEC Handbook..

Impedance grounded three-phase, 3- and 4-wire systems

Many building systems and industrial processes require the advantages of both the ungrounded delta and the grounded wye systems. These advantages are
• continuity of service (no tripping of an overcurrent device) when a fault to ground occurs between one phase (line, ungrounded) conductor and ground;
• no damaging arcing or high fault currents flowing between the shorted phase and ground that could injure individuals working on the energized equipment when the fault occurs; and
• constant line-to-line voltage levels when single-phase loads are connected to the three-phase system and not balanced (equal load on each phase).
The most common type of low-voltage system that can provide these advantages is called the “impedance grounded system”. Such systems are also referred to as high-impedance (resistance) grounded systems because of the addition of a neutral grounding device (usually a resistor) in the grounding conductor of the transformer.

The impedance grounded system has the following advantages:
• the first fault to ground [between one phase (line, ungrounded) conductor and ground] will allow a maximum of 10 A of fault current to flow that should not cause the overcurrent device to trip (open);
• there will be no damaging arcing nor high fault currents flowing between the shorted phase and ground that could injure individuals working on the energized equipment when the fault occurs, because only an additional 10 A of fault current will flow; and
• the system’s grounding enables the line-to-line voltage levels to remain constant when single-phase loads are connected to the three-phase system and not balanced (i.e., there is not an equal load on each phase).

When a fault to ground occurs between one phase (line, ungrounded) conductor and ground, the fault current path back to the source is through the neutral grounding device (impedance). Because of this inserted impedance (resistance), the maximum fault current allowed to flow is 10 A [see Rule 10-1102(2)(a)]. This value is not high enough to open the overcurrent protective devices, and the circuit or installation remains energized. As with ungrounded systems, ground detection consisting of a visual and/or audible alarm is required to indicate clearly the presence of the ground fault to supervisory personnel [see Rule 10-1102(2)(b)]. Even if equipped with ground detection, the ground fault might not be investigated until scheduled maintenance is planned, which can be many weeks after the ground fault has occurred. During this time, if a different phase in another part of the system develops a fault to ground, a line-to-line voltage fault occurs. The magnitude of this fault current is higher that a line-to-ground fault and could cause damaging arcing and current flow that could damage equipment and injure personnel.
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Old 08-10-2017, 12:36 AM   #7
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Does the being an electrician thing not apply to the great white northerners? I mean, cutting and pasting code handbook on rudimentary items...really?
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Old 08-10-2017, 01:28 AM   #8
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Man mike883 is really on a tear today.

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Old 08-10-2017, 04:11 PM   #9
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Very common in industrial settings such as PulpMills etc... where you don't want production to halt due to motor ground fault for instance ...all the MCC rooms had the RED light outside the doors.....mostly ON as I remember !
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Old 08-10-2017, 11:28 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cuba_pete View Post
Does the being an electrician thing not apply to the great white northerners? I mean, cutting and pasting code handbook on rudimentary items...really?
The OP had a question on, from my take on it, NGR's how they work and why.
The copy and paste I provided explained it fairly well I thought. It was not from the Code Book, but it is an excerpt from the Handbook and provided quite a bit more info than just the code rules on it.. I figured for someone without the knowledge on NGR's this might help.. Did it miss any points?

And as for "rudimentary", I've met instructors when I did my apprenticeship that weren't 100% sure on how they worked or where they were used, so I was asked by a classmate to explain them for him and the class.. So not everyone is well versed in every aspect of our trade..

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Old 08-11-2017, 12:20 AM   #11
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Ground fault limits on my systems I work on is usually set to 5 Amps with a 65ohm resister and are continuously rated - meaning they can carry the fault forever. Resistors are usually made of stainless steel so that they don't corrode. I see them mostly at waste water treatment plants or where there are processes and need to continue operating if there is a ground fault present.

A ground fault notification system is always in place to alert operators of a fault condition. The NGR system can then send a pulse down the line that can be detected with a wand for help find the source of a ground fault. iGard is a common brand if you want to check out some NGR devices.
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Old 08-11-2017, 01:35 AM   #12
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I'll leave it for the Canadians to sort then.
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