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Old 12-24-2018, 06:24 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by bill39 View Post
S

Joe, not trying to get into an argument here either. Just sharing ideas. Are you talking about using an A-frame or Cam track style of bender and a big table (see below)? If so, then you’re right that you won’t get a dogleg or wow in the bend.

Also, I rarely used a protractor after figuring the amount of travel for a 90 deg bend. It’s much quicker that way.
The OP says he used a triple nickle. That's doing it the hard way.

Edit: The pic didn't post. Anyway, I'm talking about a 1802 table, and a 885 rig with segment shoes.

A protractor is easier, no "figuring", and with ram travel you have to be dead on, and cinched up the same each time, otherwise you get a wonky bend. Too much room for error.

Besides you're bending a 90, @~2.5 to 5 degrees at a time, or so, making ram travel minuscule, and hit or miss at best.
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Last edited by joebanana; 12-24-2018 at 09:18 PM. Reason: no pic.
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Old 12-24-2018, 08:47 PM   #42
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Nice work @Wexcellent. Did you say your a tenth term apprentice? What is that ?
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Old 12-25-2018, 02:27 PM   #43
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This is a good question too. Many guys can figure out and post pictures of the final (me included) but what many of us want to know (or perhaps more accurately "how") did you do the bends. Pictures of the bender, table, jigs, etc are really the time savers here and the math is easy enough.

Especially if it is in rigid as in the pics. Most rookies don't even know about shrinkage, let alone calculate it for a properly placed thread on rigid. I go onto some of my jobs and there is always short pieces of pipe (PVC or EMT) all over the floor because they don't know how to calculate for the shrinkage, so they put in a bigger piece of pipe and then cut it to fit. That would never happen with rigid...

Cheers

John
I wish I had more pictures but let's just say they weren't encouraged on this particular job site.
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Old 12-25-2018, 02:33 PM   #44
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Nice work @Wexcellent. Did you say your a tenth term apprentice? What is that ?
In Oregon our apprenticeship is 8000 hrs jobsite and 800 hrs classroom. Takes an average of 5 years and they divide the classroom hrs into ten terms. So if you are ninth or tenth term it is like saying you are in the fifth year of your apprenticeship.
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Old 12-26-2018, 09:32 AM   #45
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In Oregon our apprenticeship is 8000 hrs jobsite and 800 hrs classroom. Takes an average of 5 years and they divide the classroom hrs into ten terms. So if you are ninth or tenth term it is like saying you are in the fifth year of your apprenticeship.
About the same here.

I have met guys who did the schooling and have the hours but can’t pass licence exam so they stay at fifth year rate forever. It’s not allowed but some have squeezed through and have done it for ten years and more!

We call them “Master Apprentices”
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Old 12-26-2018, 11:27 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by Wexcellent View Post
In Oregon our apprenticeship is 8000 hrs jobsite and 800 hrs classroom. Takes an average of 5 years and they divide the classroom hrs into ten terms. So if you are ninth or tenth term it is like saying you are in the fifth year of your apprenticeship.
About the same here.

I have met guys who did the schooling and have the hours but can’t pass licence exam so they stay at fifth year rate forever. It’s not allowed but some have squeezed through and have done it for ten years and more!

We call them “Master Apprentices” [IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.electriciantalk.com/images/smilies/wink.png[/IMG]
Around here they are called AFLs (apprentices for life), but most of them never finished the schooling.

Nice pipe work, man!
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Old 12-26-2018, 11:44 AM   #47
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Nice job.
Eech, I hate rigid. Last time I did some was at the Old Dutch potato chip plant about a year ago, but it was aluminum. Nice and light to work with!

Last edited by Kawicrash; 12-26-2018 at 11:47 AM.
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