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Old 02-20-2015, 02:54 PM   #1
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Default From electrician to electrical engineer.

What type of schooling would I be looking at in order to get a degree in electrical engineering?

I have been an electrician since 2001, I.E.C and NJATC apprenticeships.

No other schooling since then, just been heavily involved in industrial side of the trade ever since I got in in 1997.

I would like to pursue a job as an electrical engineer for the plant here.

I currently coordinate and plan electrical maintenance for the plant, already spend most of my time doing engineering functions I feel.

Thought about maybe a 2 year degree via an online univeristy maybe?

I would appreciate yalls thoughts on this subject.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 02-20-2015, 03:51 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Moonshot180 View Post
What type of schooling would I be looking at in order to get a degree in electrical engineering?

I have been an electrician since 2001, I.E.C and NJATC apprenticeships.

No other schooling since then, just been heavily involved in industrial side of the trade ever since I got in in 1997.

I would like to pursue a job as an electrical engineer for the plant here.

I currently coordinate and plan electrical maintenance for the plant, already spend most of my time doing engineering functions I feel.

Thought about maybe a 2 year degree via an online univeristy maybe?

I would appreciate yalls thoughts on this subject.

Thanks in advance.
If you can do it on just a 2 year degree that's great, I always thought it took 4 years though...
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Old 02-20-2015, 04:37 PM   #3
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If you can do it on just a 2 year degree that's great, I always thought it took 4 years though...
Yea, I'm pretty sure it takes 5 years at a heavy load for most people (unless you load up and go to summer school). You get a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering.

If you went to the University of Washington
Quote:
BSEE Degree Requirements and Policies
To qualify for the BSEE degree you must successfully complete 180 credit hours of course work. A minimum of 45 credits must be earned in residence at the UW in order to receive the BSEE degree. In addition, students must take at least 30 credits of specific EE coursework in residence at the UW. A summary of the current EE curriculum requirements and a sample four-year plan is available.

The EE Advising Office maintains a curriculum chart for each student in the Department (Chart for all students admitted before AUT09; Chart for AUT09 admits and beyond). This record shows each curriculum area as well as required courses within each area. In addition, you may obtain a DARS (Degree Audit Reporting System) report via the MyUW option on the UW web page. Please note that DARS reports do not always accurately reflect fulfillment of degree requirements; if you have any questions about discrepancies, please contact the EE Advising Office.

Requirements for the BSEE degree are distributed into twelve areas of study:

Mathematics
Statistics
Natural Science
Computer Programming
EE Core
EE Major Concentration Area
EE Electives
Additional Engineering Electives
Written and Oral Communication
Non-EE Approved Electives
Visual, Literary and Performing Arts/Individuals & Societies
Free Electives

Mathematics (24 credits)

MATH 124, 125, 126 Calculus with Analytical Geometry 1,2,3
MATH 307 Introduction to Differential Equations OR AMATH 351 Introduction to Differential Equations and Applications
MATH 308 Linear Algebra OR AMATH 352 Applied Linear Algebra and Numerical Analysis
MATH 324 Advanced Multivariable Calculus
Statistics (3 credits)

Choose one of the following classes:
STAT/MATH 390 Probability and Statistics in Engineering and Science
(Students intending to obtain a minor in Math should take STAT/MATH 390.)
(Students who take STAT/MATH 390 will earn 1 more credit than necessary for this requirement; excess credit will apply to Free Electives)
IND E 315 Probability and Statistics for Engineers
Natural Science (20 credits)

PHYS 121 Mechanics
PHYS 122 Electromagnetism & Oscillatory Motion
PHYS 123 Waves
CHEM 142 General Chemistry
Computer Programming (9 credits)

CSE 142 Computer Programming I
CSE 143 Computer Programming II
Electrical Engineering Core (14 credits)

EE 215 Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering
EE 233 Circuit Theory
EE 235 Continuous Time Linear Systems
http://www.ee.washington.edu/academi...uirements.html
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Old 02-20-2015, 04:44 PM   #4
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thanks for the info and link..

If it is a 5 year even with loading up the classes, I may have missed my window of opportunity..for now. I Maybe this is something I can chip away at over the years when I have time?

Not sure where I got the Idea about there being 2 year degrees in EE.

My only weak area is math...but I would be interested and willing to give it a shot.
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Old 02-20-2015, 05:13 PM   #5
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Get a real degree from Georgia Tech.
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Old 02-20-2015, 07:45 PM   #6
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You are right, there is a 2yr associates degree in ee
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Old 02-20-2015, 07:51 PM   #7
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It's not a bachelor's, but it's worth something. They have it at community colleges. You could transfer into a 4 yr college later on.
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Old 02-20-2015, 08:00 PM   #8
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Close by to TN, a top ten engineering school and a great place to live...no brainer.
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Old 02-21-2015, 09:36 AM   #9
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My only weak area is math...but I would be interested and willing to give it a shot.
That's the thing though....they take what we do for math to insane levels....

~CS~
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Old 02-21-2015, 01:18 PM   #10
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If you want it bad enough, don't let a weakness in Math discourage you. Its no cake walk, but it is attainable. I had to start at algebra and trigonometry before being able to take the core Math and Science courses. There are benefits to doing it in one shot as opposed to chipping away at it over time, but everyone's situation is different.
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Old 02-21-2015, 01:30 PM   #11
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Math, math and more math, the rest you if you know where to look it up you can make it as as an engineer. ALso you will need to wright a lot of papers and report. Good oral and writing skills are important.
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Old 02-21-2015, 03:44 PM   #12
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In the process of doing the same change. Became J-man then went into plc programming, now I'm currently getting into EE. It took getting the basics courses out of the way at a community college. Now I'm in a university taking a 4 year course.
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Old 02-21-2015, 03:54 PM   #13
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Thanks for the replies everyone, someone posted earlier that EEs push a lot of paper around, and write reports. Which I think I have already been groomed to do. The position I have right now used to be filled with EEs only, but sometime WAAAY before my time, my company started giving JWs from the shop a chance to do it (me for example). I have enjoyed it ever since I started this new career. Lots of print reading, and lots time writing reports, and work plans.

I will look into our local schools here (Chattanooga state) and UTC and enqiure more there. UAH I think has a2 year..maybe it is the associates degree that I was thinking about..
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Old 02-21-2015, 05:05 PM   #14
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In a lot of cases you get paid far better to work with your head than your hands.
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Old 02-21-2015, 05:07 PM   #15
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In a lot of cases you get paid far better to work with your head than your hands.

I am starting to find that out!! haha
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Old 02-21-2015, 05:23 PM   #16
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What type of schooling would I be looking at in order to get a degree in electrical engineering?
To become an EE you should be looking for a BSEE.

This is a 4 year program, but you can usually begin at the local community college where credits are cheaper and you can pick an associate's degree first. This is something that you can slowly chip away at taking 1-3 classes per semester but it takes a long time.

Make an appointment to see a academic advisor at the community college and inquire about a transfer plan. You should probably talk to your employer too as they may also offer some guidance; however, even if they would give you the job without the degree, keep in mind that if you're ever looking for another job many employers won't consider someone without a BSEE.
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Old 02-21-2015, 11:17 PM   #17
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Everything in the electrical world can, and is described with mathematical formulas. Since electricity is not really physical matter that you can shape and mold with your hands, you need some other tools to get it to do what you want. That's where the advanced math comes in. You'll play with things like Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, gauss's law etc. Not only will you be learning and applying these concepts, but you'll be deriving them from first principles - that's where the Calculus becomes a powerful tool.

Of course, your career may be in a field that requires little to no math, but everyone still has to learn it. If you get into the electronics side of things, you'll want to suck in as much of it as possible. The electrical consulting side is usually a lot less heavy on the intensity of calculations ... but then again, it all depends what career path you take.
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Old 02-22-2015, 06:16 AM   #18
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They usually won't transfer all your credits from a two year course. They want as much of your money as they can get.

I thought you also have to do an internship. Maybe that is only for a PE?
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Old 02-22-2015, 06:19 AM   #19
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In a lot of cases you get paid far better to work with your head than your hands.
I just want to learn to make $50k/yr trading stocks,
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Old 02-22-2015, 08:10 AM   #20
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On another note, I always thought an electrical engineering degree was four years, not five heavily loaded years. That's crazy.
I looked at Va Tech and Ga Tech requirements and they were less than the ones I posted earlier from Washington State (133 vs 180) and could be done in 4 years with 33 credits per year.

So, I guess it depends on where you go.
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