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Old 07-31-2019, 04:04 AM   #1
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I brought this tool up a year and a half ago and there were mixed emotions. I was also not sure if the tool would be useful or not. After maybe 40-60 uses I have to say this is a must for anybody who cuts a significant amount of drywall. In combination with the Makita HEPA backpack vac this tool is amazing. Almost NO dust on cuts. The only dust is when you pull the piece of drywall out.

If you already own Makita stuff this would pay for itself very quickly.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1



Last edited by Dennis Alwon; 07-31-2019 at 06:42 AM.
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Old 07-31-2019, 07:45 AM   #2
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The only concern I have with that and any other power tool used for cutting drywall is around here, the wiring in the ceiling is more often than not stapled right to the joist because there is usually strapping across the joists. That, if the depth isn't set right will slice the romex. For walls it would be safe though.
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Old 07-31-2019, 09:36 AM   #3
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Can you adjust the blade depth?
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Old 07-31-2019, 10:07 AM   #4
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Can you adjust the blade depth?

The Amazon ad says it has adjustable blade depth.


Do you think this would be better than a multitool?
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Old 07-31-2019, 10:22 AM   #5
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The Amazon ad says it has adjustable blade depth.


Do you think this would be better than a multitool?
Maybe, if you’re taking out long pieces of drywall. If I’m cutting out drywall across studs or joists for ten or twenty feet, I’ll use a circular saw with a blade depth of slightly more than 1/2”. It’s okay if the area has been gutted for renovations but does create a lot of dust.
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Old 07-31-2019, 12:00 PM   #6
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The only concern I have with that and any other power tool used for cutting drywall is around here, the wiring in the ceiling is more often than not stapled right to the joist because there is usually strapping across the joists. That, if the depth isn't set right will slice the romex. For walls it would be safe though.
Oh wow. That would be a one in a million scenario here. In that case you would need to set the blade perfectly.

You could do a small cut with your jab saw to check the depth and then go to town.
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Old 07-31-2019, 12:07 PM   #7
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Can you adjust the blade depth?

The Amazon ad says it has adjustable blade depth.


Do you think this would be better than a multitool?
The multitool has it’s place for sure. I own a cordless and corded version and they are invaluable tools.

The problem with a multitool when cutting drywall is the dust and speed. If you have the vacuum attached to this tool it is almost dustless. It also has a guide so you can almost go as fast as you want.

I showed this to my other EC buddies and they were skeptical as well... until I showed it in action. Now they want me to bring it to every job!
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Old 07-31-2019, 12:07 PM   #8
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Oh wow. That would be a one in a million scenario here. In that case you would need to set the blade perfectly.

You could do a small cut with your jab saw to check the depth and then go to town.
Not really. Do you guys strap joists out that way? (I forget)

If you've seen how romex is run here you would know what @nrp3 is talking about. There are pics on here somewhere.
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Old 07-31-2019, 12:12 PM   #9
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The only concern I have with that and any other power tool used for cutting drywall is around here, the wiring in the ceiling is more often than not stapled right to the joist because there is usually strapping across the joists. That, if the depth isn't set right will slice the romex. For walls it would be safe though.
Yep.

That's why I always use pliers and a beater screwdriver to make a little "recon hole".

Then I peek in with a flashlight and feel around a bit for pipes, wires, (and ducts now) before the saw comes out.
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Old 07-31-2019, 12:34 PM   #10
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Quote:
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Oh wow. That would be a one in a million scenario here. In that case you would need to set the blade perfectly.

You could do a small cut with your jab saw to check the depth and then go to town.
Not really. Do you guys strap joists out that way? (I forget)

If you've seen how romex is run here you would know what @nrp3 is talking about. There are pics on here somewhere.
Hmm... no I don’t think I know what you’re talking about but am interested in seeing that.
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Old 07-31-2019, 03:31 PM   #11
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Do they have a double blade version maybe spaced an inch apart I have seen strips removed in apartment hall walls that run the length of the hallways to install retrofit fire alarm cable
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Old 07-31-2019, 06:18 PM   #12
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I love my Makitas -- and that looks terrific -- but I have to tell you -- I sure make every attempt to stay out of the cutting-slabs-out-of-sheet-rock business. Sometimes I lose.

For the very few times I'm faced with such a pain I use the common sawzall -- with a stub-blade that I cut short with my air grinder -- then use a stone on them. Even dull (metal cutting -- which leaves a mild kerf) blades are more than sufficient for sheet rock. I don't grind down the new stuff. I test for depth by using a Klein torpedo level... as I work around 5/8" sheet rock. I'd rather even be a touch shallow. I can always come back and slice through with a razor knife... again, using a dull blade. I'm more interested in zero collateral damage than speed.


In my commercial world, the joint is going to be dusty has all get out, anyway. So an ordinary vacuum held close to the cut is satisfactory for dust control. I can't stand that junk in my lungs, so I use all manner of PPE.

Last edited by telsa; 07-31-2019 at 06:27 PM.
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Old 07-31-2019, 06:22 PM   #13
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Out my way such strappings are referred to as furring strips.

Chicago, the land of EMT, loves fat furring strips so that EMT can be snaked every which way. Then a blanket of insulation goes in -- and do they need it!
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Old 07-31-2019, 06:26 PM   #14
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Do they have a double blade version maybe spaced an inch apart I have seen strips removed in apartment hall walls that run the length of the hallways to install retrofit fire alarm cable
Not that I know of.
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Old 07-31-2019, 06:34 PM   #15
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Out my way such strappings are referred to as furring strips.

Chicago, the land of EMT, loves fat furring strips so that EMT can be snaked every which way. Then a blanket of insulation goes in -- and do they need it!
Ah, ok got it. Just a different terminology. Thanks.
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Old 07-31-2019, 07:49 PM   #16
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I love my Makitas -- and that looks terrific -- but I have to tell you -- I sure make every attempt to stay out of the cutting-slabs-out-of-sheet-rock business. Sometimes I lose.

For the very few times I'm faced with such a pain I use the common sawzall -- with a stub-blade that I cut short with my air grinder -- then use a stone on them. Even dull (metal cutting -- which leaves a mild kerf) blades are more than sufficient for sheet rock. I don't grind down the new stuff. I test for depth by using a Klein torpedo level... as I work around 5/8" sheet rock. I'd rather even be a touch shallow. I can always come back and slice through with a razor knife... again, using a dull blade. I'm more interested in zero collateral damage than speed.



In my commercial world, the joint is going to be dusty has all get out, anyway. So an ordinary vacuum held close to the cut is satisfactory for dust control. I can't stand that junk in my lungs, so I use all manner of PPE.
You love making things complicated.
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Old 08-01-2019, 12:28 AM   #17
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Yep.



That's why I always use pliers and a beater screwdriver to make a little "recon hole".



Then I peek in with a flashlight and feel around a bit for pipes, wires, (and ducts now) before the saw comes out.
I will beat a hole with a cabinet long shank screwdriver. Then I twirl a piece of cut off fish tape (shaped like an L) for my recon probe.

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Old 08-01-2019, 09:10 AM   #18
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This guy is a pro remodeler and he cut the drywall to the edge of the stud. This doesn't make sense. Why didn't he cut it down the middle of the studs so the new drywall had something to rest on?
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Old 08-01-2019, 09:49 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Simpson Electric View Post
I brought this tool up a year and a half ago and there were mixed emotions. I was also not sure if the tool would be useful or not. After maybe 40-60 uses I have to say this is a must for anybody who cuts a significant amount of drywall. In combination with the Makita HEPA backpack vac this tool is amazing. Almost NO dust on cuts. The only dust is when you pull the piece of drywall out.

If you already own Makita stuff this would pay for itself very quickly.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1



How is line of sight on the blade?

It looks like the plastic guard would get dirty real fast.
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Old 08-01-2019, 09:52 AM   #20
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This guy is a pro remodeler and he cut the drywall to the edge of the stud. This doesn't make sense. Why didn't he cut it down the middle of the studs so the new drywall had something to rest on?
This bothers the hell out of me, it is so stupid. I have seen so-called pros do the same thing both in real life and on YouTube. Then they have to take the time to cut up blocks to screw to the studs in order to screw the drywall back. It’s idiotic, they should be shot in the face.
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