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Old 12-04-2010, 01:50 PM   #1
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Question GFI 4 non-grnd recepts

I need to prove to our local OSHA inspector [wanna-be] that I can use gfi receptacles in outlets where there is no ground present. However I can't remember where it is in the NEC. Does anyone know the NEC section/article where this info can be found?
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Old 12-04-2010, 01:51 PM   #2
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The NEC allows it in some instances, OSHA does not.

As far as the NEC look at 406.3(D).
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Old 12-04-2010, 02:05 PM   #3
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OSHA guy said if it is in the NEC then he will sign off on it. Thanks for the help!
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Old 12-04-2010, 02:22 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sierrarider View Post
OSHA guy said if it is in the NEC then he will sign off on it. Thanks for the help!
He should not and you will still be liable.

Check this official interpretation direct from OSHA

http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owad...ONS&p_id=22962
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Old 12-04-2010, 03:32 PM   #5
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He should not and you will still be liable.

Check this official interpretation direct from OSHA

http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owad...ONS&p_id=22962
That link is a LIE.
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Old 12-04-2010, 03:36 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Frasbee View Post
That link is a LIE.
No it's not. OSHA agrees with the GFCI will interrupt the circuit over 6ma of fault current within a few cycles, BUT ONLY AFTER some fault current has already flowed; likely through your body. OSHA doesn't permit even that split second tiny fault current to flow through your body as a requirement of the GFCI operating. They'd rather have an actual ground path to possibly stand a chance of tripping the GFCI than to solely rely on your body. This is why they inspect for broken ground pins on extension cords, even though everyone's plugged in via a GFCI.
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Old 12-04-2010, 03:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frasbee View Post
That link is a LIE.
Are you drunk?

Can you tell me what the lie is?
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Old 12-04-2010, 03:41 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by MDShunk View Post
No it's not. OSHA agrees with the GFCI will interrupt the circuit over 6ma of fault current within a few cycles, BUT ONLY AFTER some fault current has already flowed; likely through your body. OSHA doesn't permit even that split second tiny fault current to flow through your body as a requirement of the GFCI operating. They'd rather have an actual ground path to possibly stand a chance of tripping the GFCI than to solely rely on your body. This is why they inspect for broken ground pins on extension cords, even though everyone's plugged in via a GFCI.
OSHA also will allow an "approved grounding system" OR GFCI protection for temporary wiring. While the NEC or NFPA 70E (forget which one) will only except GFCI protection for temp wiring.

IMHO I think all temp should have GFCI protection and OSHA should drop that silly approved grounding system option.
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Old 12-04-2010, 03:47 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Frasbee View Post
That link is a LIE.
Just felt like making some crazy statement to flip everyone out or what?
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Old 12-04-2010, 04:07 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by slickvic277 View Post
OSHA also will allow an "approved grounding system" OR GFCI protection for temporary wiring. While the NEC or NFPA 70E (forget which one) will only except GFCI protection for temp wiring.

IMHO I think all temp should have GFCI protection and OSHA should drop that silly approved grounding system option.
I don't know. I've had to temp in portable panels off 480 services that only had ground fault monitors.
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Old 12-05-2010, 12:58 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by BBQ View Post
Are you drunk?

Can you tell me what the lie is?
It went to a blank page when I clicked it yesterday.
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