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Old 06-17-2019, 09:57 AM   #1
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Default Hanging a TV

I have done a lot of things, most of them poorly, but I have never hung a TV.

It’s a 60” TV and a steel stud wall. No way am I going to trust those steel studs. I’m thinking that mounting plywood is best. Suggestions?

If I’m lucky, there will be a T-bar ceiling on the opposite side of the wall and I can put carriage bolts through to hold the plywood. Not sure until I get there.
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Old 06-17-2019, 10:52 AM   #2
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I've hung em using this type of anchor with 1/4" bolts. Just have to make sure you hit studs when drilling.

Hanging a TV-strap.png
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Old 06-17-2019, 10:54 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by stuiec View Post
I've hung em using this type of anchor with 1/4" bolts. Just have to make sure you hit studs when drilling.

Attachment 134432
WTF is that and where do I buy it?
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Old 06-17-2019, 10:57 AM   #4
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WTF is that and where do I buy it?
Here's the local

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/pau...0pk/1000695135

Its like a toggle bolt. Drill a hole, slip the wing with the threaded hole in, and cinch in the plastic straps. they pull the wing back to the hole and keep it there ready to accept the bolt. Straps snap off.
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Old 06-17-2019, 10:57 AM   #5
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cut the drywall beyond stud cavity, run wire, rg-6, hdmi, and whatever else you need, fasten your blocking through the sides of the studs in the cavity, screw the drywall back on, mud it if you want, and mount your tv mount over your opening. No wiring will show and your cutting won't be visible with the tv mounted.
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:09 AM   #6
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cut the drywall beyond stud cavity, run wire, rg-6, hdmi, and whatever else you need, fasten your blocking through the sides of the studs in the cavity, screw the drywall back on, mud it if you want, and mount your tv mount over your opening. No wiring will show and your cutting won't be visible with the tv mounted.
So you’re saying cut the wall open and screw 2 X 4’s to the studs?
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:17 AM   #7
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So you’re saying cut the wall open and screw 2 X 4’s to the studs?
You bet. 2x6 is even better for load distribution
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:30 AM   #8
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I have hung literally 100's of TVs on steel studs without an issue. The biggest was about 125 pounds on a full motion articulating mount, the mount had to weigh 25 pounds. But the mount was big, hit the studs with six anchors.

The wall groaned with that fully extended but did not budge. I use the easytoggles pictured above. They (or equivalent brands) are at Home Depot and Lowes here. With normal size TVs to say 60" and mounts, steel studs - ho hum. If it's not an articulating mount I'm happy if I can hit one stud, and you can always hit one stud. I would probably trust four of the easytoggles in drywall, no stud, with most TVs and non-articulating mounts.

Locate your studs as best you can with a magnet then verify the exact center by probing the drywall with a coat hanger or smaller wire. I use the stepless bits from Harbor Freight to drill the drywall and the stud perfect every time.

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Old 06-17-2019, 11:47 AM   #9
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What does the wall mount manufacture say? I put up some 52" ones with no problems on rock and steel studs with 1/4" toggles.
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Old 06-17-2019, 12:14 PM   #10
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Another vote for toggles into the metal studs.
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Old 06-17-2019, 12:48 PM   #11
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During my years working in hospitals and malls, and while the TVs weighed a lot more, I have hung well over a hundred larger sized TVs using normal 1/4" toggle bolts thru the studs. Never an issue. I used a 7/8" holesaw since that was always available (1/2" KO size) but I definitely prefer using 5/8".

When you go thru the stud with a toggle bolt, you are turning that entire stud into a giant washer.
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Old 06-17-2019, 02:50 PM   #12
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It's not as big of deal to hang TVs like it used to be.
Today, a 65" Sony weighs 46lbs. Four toggle bolts into metal studs averages about 12lbs on each toggle.
Since the stress is mostly shear and not tensile, 1/4" toggle bolts are all you need.
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Old 06-17-2019, 06:04 PM   #13
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Great to know. My 1989 JVC finally wore out. So I to will have my first "flat screen" tv and mount it to the wall.
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Old 06-17-2019, 06:28 PM   #14
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Use one of those Arlington recessed TV boxes. Locate the stud before you cut and make sure the edge of your box is at least 3.5" away from a stud. That hole will be large enough to slide a 2x4 on the flat into the wall. Screw your bracket to the lumber fairly close to the center. That, combined with some toggle bolts on the sides and that puppy is never falling down.
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Old 06-19-2019, 02:24 PM   #15
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Those funny looking snap off toggle thingies work durn good. Better than toggle bolts because they don’t flop around. Solid. Thanks guys .

Last edited by 99cents; 06-19-2019 at 02:26 PM.
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Old 06-19-2019, 04:45 PM   #16
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Those funny looking snap off toggle thingies work durn good. Better than toggle bolts because they don’t flop around. Solid. Thanks guys .
I've never tried them but need to take heed.

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Old 06-19-2019, 05:01 PM   #17
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I've never tried them but need to take heed.

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I have used them a lot in the past. The two major benefits over normal toggles are that they remain in the wall even if you have to remove the bolts and you could use short bolts.

With that said, I really don’t see much of a benefit and I use standard toggle bolts today.
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Old 06-19-2019, 06:59 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HackWork View Post



I have used them a lot in the past. The two major benefits over normal toggles are that they remain in the wall even if you have to remove the bolts and you could use short bolts.



With that said, I really don’t see much of a benefit and I use standard toggle bolts today.
I love those anchors, though they're a bit expensive. Another benefit is that they're a solid piece of metal, not hinged in the middle like a regular toggle, which can be a weak point if over tightened. I think they also have a little more depth to the threaded area so they're less likely to strip on you. I still use regular toggles most of the time, but for rather heavy things or anything I think I might need to take down, I like the snap off toggles.

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Old 06-19-2019, 07:17 PM   #19
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I hardly ever use regular toggles any more. The snaptoggles are far lower frustration.

If the mounting holes on the equipment are small, you have to put the bolts through the holes, start the toggles on the bolts, then insert the toggles in the holes, and pull them into the wall material while tightening. This can be a fiddly pain in the ass with a little TV mount, hanging something big, it's a ****show.
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Old 06-19-2019, 07:23 PM   #20
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I love those anchors, though they're a bit expensive. Another benefit is that they're a solid piece of metal, not hinged in the middle like a regular toggle, which can be a weak point if over tightened. I think they also have a little more depth to the threaded area so they're less likely to strip on you. I still use regular toggles most of the time, but for rather heavy things or anything I think I might need to take down, I like the snap off toggles.
The bolded part are two things that I also thought when I first started using the "togglers" (snap off toggles), you are absolutely correct.

But in actual practice, normal toggles just work. The same reason why I have gone from plastic anchors to every other expensive anchor or cement screw, then right back to plastic anchors in the end. They just work.
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