How do you strip 200 - 500 kcmil wire??????? - Page 2 - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
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Old 12-27-2016, 07:06 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by macmikeman View Post
For that size wire I use my rabbit cutter pliers to score . And then I merely pull the insulation off after that, no need to cut it loose.
Never heard of a tool called a rabbit cutter? Sounds like everyone else has. Is it just a wire stripper?
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Old 12-27-2016, 07:24 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Suncoast Power View Post
I have a pile of those ripelys, they seem to have to be adjusted for each type of jacket. It's a PITA.

I use a small Klien pocket knife.
I make a small horizontal cut about an 1-1/2 or what ever the depth of the lug is and then make a vertical cut towards the end of the cable.
I then drop back down and complete the horizontal score cut around the cable.
This type of cut leaves a vertical tap that can be used to peel the insulation off of the cable.
This cut and peel can be accomplished in 5 seconds or less and leaves only one piece of insulation that gets dropped in a small box by your feet.
I then hit the termination with a battery impact with a long hex key.
We then determine the torque value usually printed on a label inside of the gear.
Our designated "torque boy" will torque each termination and put a sharpie mark across the lug.
We will also typical write the torque value on each type lug. I.e. 42

This method works best for me but, I only do maybe 300 or so terminations in a year. Other guys here sometimes spend months making up switch gear.
How do you know that you haven't over torqued it with the impact before you hit it with the torque wrench?
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Old 12-27-2016, 07:27 PM   #23
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Never heard of a tool called a rabbit cutter? Sounds like everyone else has. Is it just a wire stripper?
The cindys ( loppers). Bunny gun? You know.
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Old 12-27-2016, 07:29 PM   #24
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I don't really torque anything, but I almost always put a sharpie mark across it.
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Old 12-27-2016, 07:54 PM   #25
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I don't really torque anything, but I almost always put a sharpie mark across it.
That's funny. What I am really saying is sometimes maybe. Really never. I myself am more worried about over torqued aluminum. Like it or not, it is here to stay. A lot of guys will wiggle large copper conductors, then spot torque again. A habit that should never be done on aluminum. On copper, I like to do it cause it settles the strands in a bit. Probably the wrong thing to do, but it is how I was taught. Insurance that the wire won't just fall out of the lug I guess. Over torqued aluminum on the other hand will just keep squishing out till there's nothing left.
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Old 12-27-2016, 09:56 PM   #26
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Never heard of a tool called a rabbit cutter? Sounds like everyone else has. Is it just a wire stripper?
The pieces of conductor left after you trim them to fit are referred to as rabbit. Thus the device used to make them is called a rabbit gun. It's a large diameter cable cutter. Like bolt cutters but for conductor. Do you just call em cable cutters?



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Old 12-27-2016, 11:09 PM   #27
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Utility knife, ring and slit then peal.
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Old 12-28-2016, 05:43 AM   #28
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Do you use a special tool or a blade or a pocket knife???? Any special technique to not damage the conductors?????



I use a blade or sharp knife to cut the circle around the wire, then I cut a lengthwise slit, then I peel back and use blade to complete the job. It is slow but no tool cost involved.


It may seem easier to use the method you are referring to as far as slicing the insulation with your cutting instrument (whatever that may be) perpendicular to the conductor then making a semi parallel slice to the end of the conductor, then removing the insulation. However, it is frowned upon by most inspectors and engineers, for the fact that it has been known to create "hot spots"! Believe it or not that sharp blade or razor knife will definitely score the conductor.
The proper way to remove the insulation is to sort of "carve/whittle" the insulation off the complete diameter of the conductor never holding the blade perpendicular to the actual conductor itself. It is much more painstaking and time consuming, but it is the right way and will create a much better installation and avoid any "hotspots" years down the road.


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Old 12-28-2016, 05:47 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by papaotis View Post
around here the linesmen use a carpet layers hook knife. just pull it toward them. either they have a specail technique or they dont worry about nicks
It takes practice to lay the blade flat enough not to dig in just as it does to score and grab enough jacket just to tear it loose with linemans.
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Old 12-28-2016, 05:53 AM   #30
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It takes practice to lay the blade flat enough not to dig in just as it does to score and grab enough jacket just to tear it loose with linemans.


To true! It definitely takes experience! We all have learned tricks of the trade. And only experience and training and being trained will teach us that. I just always like to show my green hands the "proper method" then the more productive method in the field. And as time goes on they will find what best suites them.


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Old 12-28-2016, 05:59 AM   #31
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How do you know that you haven't over torqued it with the impact before you hit it with the torque wrench?
Two things to mitigate over torque.
Using a long hex key, they flex more than you would expect.
Lower setting on the impact. You don't want to use an 18 volt Milwalkee on a high setting for this part.
I always expect to get a slight turn and then a pop from the torque wrench.
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Old 12-28-2016, 06:00 AM   #32
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To true! It definitely takes experience! We all have learned tricks of the trade. And only experience and training and being trained will teach us that. I just always like to show my green hands the "proper method" then the more productive method in the field. And as time goes on they will find what best suites them.


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As long as they don't use a razor knife, seen far too many slips and stitches after.
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Old 12-28-2016, 06:04 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by joellyj7 View Post
It may seem easier to use the method you are referring to as far as slicing the insulation with your cutting instrument (whatever that may be) perpendicular to the conductor then making a semi parallel slice to the end of the conductor, then removing the insulation. However, it is frowned upon by most inspectors and engineers, for the fact that it has been known to create "hot spots"! Believe it or not that sharp blade or razor knife will definitely score the conductor.
The proper way to remove the insulation is to sort of "carve/whittle" the insulation off the complete diameter of the conductor never holding the blade perpendicular to the actual conductor itself. It is much more painstaking and time consuming, but it is the right way and will create a much better installation and avoid any "hotspots" years down the road.


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I don't let guys pull out a razor knife on a cable termination or have them waste time penciling a low voltage cable.
If they are an experienced cable splicer, work fast and thay are not milking the job, they can have the whole thing and do whatever they want.
I know how cables to expect to be put up in an hour, it's very telling if someone knows what they are doing.
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Old 12-28-2016, 06:14 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Suncoast Power View Post
I don't let guys pull out a razor knife on a cable termination or have them waste time penciling a low voltage cable.

If they are an experienced cable splicer, work fast and thay are not milking the job, they can have the whole thing and do whatever they want.

I know how cables to expect to be put up in an hour, it's very telling if someone knows what they are doing.


I like the word penciling!


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Old 12-28-2016, 06:22 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by LawnGuyLandSparky View Post
A pipecutter.
I have not tried this but I am going to for the ring cut. I have one of these somewhere



that I use once a year for tubing. I imagine once you figure out how far to turn the wheel after it touches the insulation, it would be totally repeatable to ring the wire without ever going to far and nicking the wires.

I have tried the slitters that will make the parallel cut but they haven't worked great, I still wind up using a knife. I think a cured blade is less likely to dive in and nick the wire but I really have to go slow.
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Old 12-28-2016, 06:54 AM   #36
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No


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Old 12-28-2016, 08:30 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by joellyj7 View Post
It may seem easier to use the method you are referring to as far as slicing the insulation with your cutting instrument (whatever that may be) perpendicular to the conductor then making a semi parallel slice to the end of the conductor, then removing the insulation. However, it is frowned upon by most inspectors and engineers, for the fact that it has been known to create "hot spots"! Believe it or not that sharp blade or razor knife will definitely score the conductor.
The proper way to remove the insulation is to sort of "carve/whittle" the insulation off the complete diameter of the conductor never holding the blade perpendicular to the actual conductor itself. It is much more painstaking and time consuming, but it is the right way and will create a much better installation and avoid any "hotspots" years down the road.


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I was taught the same thing in school. One in the field however I realized it's just as easy to gouge the conductor while penciling as it is to nick the conductor while ringing.

So I made up this story about how electrons crossing the gap of a nick created resistance and there for heat. While a gouge allowed the electrons to smoothly flow past as normal. I realize now that it was my minds attempt to assuage my cognitive dissonance about what I was taught and what I observed.

I've been threatening to run some experiments in the shop for years now but haven't got around to it. We def have the equipment needed but it seems that when there's down time there is something more pressing that needs to get done.

So I'm just wondering if you have any scientific data about nicks in the conductor that aren't just anecdotes or opinions of past professors. If anyone has concrete data I would love to hear it.

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Old 12-28-2016, 10:28 AM   #38
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I have not tried this but I am going to for the ring cut. I have one of these somewhere



that I use once a year for tubing. I imagine once you figure out how far to turn the wheel after it touches the insulation, it would be totally repeatable to ring the wire without ever going to far and nicking the wires.
(snip)
Yes, there's a slight learning curve but anyone not an idiot will pickup the process easily. When it comes to terminating 500s and other "huge" wire,I'm not in the least bit concerned if I overtighten and "scratch" the conductors a bit. Everything I work on is overengineered 100% or better anyway.
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Old 12-30-2016, 08:54 PM   #39
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I've skinned a ton of big wire with a knife like Glen1971 pictured. My company had a rule about tools having to be approved and they were really strict on knives.
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