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Old 07-04-2017, 11:48 PM   #1
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Default How to GFCI protect a multiwire branch circuit, half hot

This one got me thinking about how it can possibly be done, i'm a bit new to electrical, this is just a bit more complicated than usual so I figured it'd take a pro to answer this..

I have a dishwasher and garbage disposal on what looks like a 20A dual pole circuit breaker (both are switch together at the panel), and going to the outlet under the sink, the old outlet was half hot with red with white at the top outlet plug(always hot), and black wire nutted to go up to the switch and return back to the bottom plug(switched).

My question is can I go GFCI and still use both circuits? I heard I can use 2 separate single outlets and feed power from the other, but that puts both devices on the same circuit and I don't think NEC allows that?

And if the power source is coming in from under the sink at the outlet, does GFCI even make sense since the live power is always there anyway, where water could spill?
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Old 07-04-2017, 11:50 PM   #2
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If there is just a single gang box already installed, then use a 2P GFCI breaker.

You could install 2 GFCI receptacles... But then they would necessarily be accessible by your jurisdiction.
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Old 07-04-2017, 11:56 PM   #3
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If there is just a single gang box already installed, then use a 2P GFCI breaker.

You could install 2 GFCI receptacles... But then they would necessarily be accessible by your jurisdiction.

Hi, its just a steel outlet box with 2 break outs for the wires coming in. I'd like to have one outlet plug hot and the other switched if possible. But I don't want to replace anything at the panel.
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Old 07-04-2017, 11:56 PM   #4
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Before I can answer your question .,,

Are you electrician helper or homeowner ?
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Old 07-04-2017, 11:59 PM   #5
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Before I can answer your question .,,

Are you electrician helper or homeowner ?
.... Homeowner..... Who says "Steel Breakouts"....
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Old 07-05-2017, 12:06 AM   #6
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uhh, you guys are mind readers I see. Should I really post this to the DIY chatroom instead then?
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Old 07-05-2017, 12:08 AM   #7
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You should hire an electrician... SF codes are not the necessarily the NEC codes. SF has their own codes, so a DIY site will really not be versed in them, only a local electrician will.
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Old 07-05-2017, 12:09 AM   #8
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Sorry .,, just follow the link below and some of us is there on our sister site so it will guide you correct on the info what you are looking for.,,

And beaware of the Californa codes they do have alot of local codes some of the peoples are not aware of it.

safest bet is get a electrician to do the correct way and be done with it.





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