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Old 08-01-2020, 02:54 AM   #1
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Default I gots me a question.

My son tells me that at public schools any pipe run below 7' ft from grade has to be galvanized rigid steel conduit. I know that's not an NEC rule or an International Building Code rule. Maybe a rule from the United States Department of Education? Urban Myth? Just a spec that gets copied and pasted over and over without any oversight?


I know I have done add on work in classrooms at schools and I used wire mold sometimes and emt all the other times. If you know about it , I'd love to hear about it and why.
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Old 08-01-2020, 04:15 AM   #2
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Maybe it's a holdover from when schools were fallout shelters, copied and pasted into specs since the start of the cold war.
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Old 08-01-2020, 08:37 AM   #3
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I and many others are in trouble then. I put at least half a mile of EMT in a school below 7 feet during a remodel. 2006 maybe?

Is your son in an electrical school of some sort? Because apprentices come out of class every day with some little nugget of bullchit their instructor insisted was true, only to have you explain why he's stupid.
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Old 08-01-2020, 08:48 AM   #4
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Did quite a few schools (long time ago) only rigid was in the slab
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Old 08-01-2020, 08:56 AM   #5
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Sounds like a spec specific to a contract job. So if anyone was to go a do job, maybe directly for the board of Ed, without specifications agreed to, just the NEC would apply?

From last fall to this spring we did a job for a large venue. Some of the specs included PVC coated RGS outdoors from grade to a height of 10'. RGS in all other outdoor locations. This included all rooftop equipment. There was a lot of roof top refrigeration equipment fed from pitch pockets. This was the first major improvement in maybe 20 years. The work that has gone on there for years before, certainly didn't have any specs. Most was just driven by half assed repairs that would never even pass a normal inspection.

At times it felt like we were putting lipstick on a pig. Most of the work was for new buildings, but we did have to re-feed old buildings, and upgrade the fire alarm. So some of the work done to spec, was next to dilapidated old wiring. Here is the spec section for the school I'm on now. There is also a spec section for power conductors and cables that allow MC above ceilings and in walls, but not exposed indoors or out, or in concrete or slabs, or underground.



Quote:
PART 3 - EXECUTION


3.1 RACEWAY APPLICATION


A. Outdoors: Apply raceway products as specified below, unless otherwise indicated:

1. Exposed Conduit: Rigid steel conduit.

2. Concealed Conduit, Aboveground: Rigid steel conduit.

3. Underground Conduit: RNC, Type EPC-40-PVC, direct buried or concrete encased ductbank as indicated on the drawings.

4. Connection to Vibrating Equipment (Including Transformers and Hydraulic, Pneumatic, Electric Solenoid, or Motor-Driven Equipment): LFNC. 5. Boxes and Enclosures, Aboveground: NEMA 250, Type 4X.



B. Comply with the following indoor applications, unless otherwise indicated:



1. Exposed in non-public areas (electrical rooms, storage rooms, mechanicals rooms, attics, etc.), Not Subject to Physical Damage: EMT.

2. Exposed in public areas (classrooms, offices, corridors, etc.), Not Subject to Physical Damage: Surface Metallic Raceway.

3. Concealed in Ceilings and Interior Walls and Partitions: EMT.

4. Connection to Vibrating Equipment (Including Transformers and Hydraulic, Pneumatic, Electric Solenoid, or Motor-Driven Equipment): FMC, except use LFMC in damp or wet locations.

5. Damp or Wet Locations: Rigid steel conduit.

6. Raceways for Optical Fiber or Communications Cable in Spaces Used for Environmental Air: EMT.

7. Boxes and Enclosures: NEMA 250, Type 1, except use NEMA 250, Type 4, stainless steel in damp or wet locations.



C. Minimum Raceway Size: 3/4-inch (21-mm) trade size.



D. Raceway Fittings: Compatible with raceways and suitable for use and location.
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Old 08-01-2020, 10:49 AM   #6
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Seems to me every surface mounted drop in NYC schools I've seen is just emt.

Anybody that knows NYC codes know they like 'bomb proof' overkill designs most often.
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Old 08-01-2020, 11:31 AM   #7
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In my mind , I was thinking probably specs. He told me about not just one school specifically, he has worked on multiple sites and the company he is working for followed this , and he asked about it and they said federal rule for all public schools. I never heard of such a thing and thought to ask in here, thinking about how the Department of Education might have stuck it in just cause they are "in charge" ....... Hell it might be a State of Hawaii regulation , but I never read or heard about that either.

My guess is still Urban myth or company specific myth. I surly would like to know the real truth. I wanna answer him properly on it.
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Old 08-05-2020, 10:54 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brian john View Post
Did quite a few schools (long time ago) only rigid was in the slab
"Ah, but I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now...

Wow! You sound like you're as old as I am! Who'da thunk Bob Dylan would make it to an Electrician's forum?
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Old 08-05-2020, 12:29 PM   #9
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It's probably because kids being kids will attempt to jump up and hang on the pipe. Rigid (and it's associated strong hangers) is less likely to break.
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