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mpcxl 09-14-2017 08:08 PM

Industrial electricians.
 
Why are industrial electricians so tough and rough around the edges? Does life really suck that much?

dmxtothemax 09-14-2017 08:14 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Attachment 112786


:thumbsup:

mpcxl 09-14-2017 08:24 PM

Make money money. Get money's money ?

brian john 09-14-2017 08:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mpcxl (Post 4341978)
Why are industrial electricians so tough and rough around the edges? Does life really suck that much?

Have you ever worked construction talk about rough.

mpcxl 09-14-2017 08:34 PM

Lol. Yeah it's my first time. The twofer gizinta the come along.

bill39 09-14-2017 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mpcxl (Post 4341978)
Why are industrial electricians so tough and rough around the edges? Does life really suck that much?

Just spitballing here, but maybe it's not that they are so rough as you are soft??
:eek:

backstay 09-14-2017 08:51 PM

What's an "industrial electrician"? Works in a plant, works construction, just not residential? So are you talking about an construction electrician?

Cow 09-14-2017 09:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mpcxl (Post 4341978)
Why are industrial electricians so tough and rough around the edges? Does life really suck that much?

Because real men don't need sensitivity training....

mpcxl 09-14-2017 09:23 PM

I can see it now. Book title. " How to become a douche bag and suck **** simultaneously". I am projecting here. But it could happen. You never know.

micromind 09-14-2017 09:35 PM

Industrial maintenance electricians actually have a pretty rough life.

Just about every time you start a project, something major will burn up somewhere and you'll need to drop what you're doing and go handle it.

And quickly......we're losing billions per second.........

After a while, it can get to you and a lot of guys become jaded.

It's very easy to take it out on anyone nearby.......

dronai 09-14-2017 09:41 PM

Weekend and holidays, are the best time for shutdowns

scotch 09-14-2017 09:49 PM

I worked Refinery....gas alarm and put on your re-breather ; Mining...mud everywhere ; PulpMill....LimeKiln/ReCaust section was hot and messy . So moving to Industrial HVAC was a pleasant change .Then with the Telco was the proverbial "walk in the park " ....unless the HVAC all failed in summer ! And it did often !
It's what you make of the struggle and how you learn and adapt that counts .

mpcxl 09-14-2017 09:49 PM

Rock cocaine and meth are the best things for flyinhigh.

3DDesign 09-14-2017 10:00 PM

I worked in the steel mills for US Steel back in the late 70's. One plant employed 21,000 workers, another had 14,000. These plants lined the rivers of Pittsburgh, one after another. One of those plants was five miles long and 2 miles wide.
Some of those men were completely miserable. They hated their jobs but couldn't leave because they made so much money. $45,000/yr in 1978 was a lot of money.

oldblue 09-16-2017 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cow (Post 4342266)
Because real men don't need sensitivity training....

Unless they make it a condition of your parole.

MechanicalDVR 09-16-2017 11:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cow (Post 4342266)
Because real men don't need sensitivity training....

Real men cause others to become overly sensitive! :laughing::laughing:

matt1124 09-16-2017 11:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3DDesign (Post 4342626)
I worked in the steel mills for US Steel back in the late 70's. One plant employed 21,000 workers, another had 14,000. These plants lined the rivers of Pittsburgh, one after another. One of those plants was five miles long and 2 miles wide.
Some of those men were completely miserable. They hated their jobs but couldn't leave because they made so much money. $45,000/yr in 1978 was a lot of money.

From dollartimes.com:
"$45,000.00 in 1978 had the same buying power as $174,950.72 in 2017

Annual inflation over this period was about 3.54%"


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