Infrared inspection - Page 2 - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum > Electrical Forum > General Electrical Discussion


Like Tree11Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-24-2016, 05:54 PM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: New York City, New York, USA
Posts: 87
Rewards Points: 131
Default

I agree, IR testing services provided superb analysis for heat loss analysis, etc. but don't really belong in electrical equipment testing environments. We have done repairs based on tests done by these companies (they hired an electrician to open the panels, etc.) and purchased a mid-priced Testo unit to confirm analysis/repair. We mostly found no problems with the identified concern areas, but did identify other potential problem areas.

IR testing is good when a knowledgable electrician does the tests because he can more readily evaluate readings, perform additional tests, and make minor repairs, etc. at the same time.

One problem associated with IR testing is that most of the time, the (fixed) electrical load is too low to give an adequate IR reading on a bad connection, and a good visual inspection along with a physical check of wire connections, etc. is more useful.
khfiei is offline   Reply With Quote
Join Contractor Talk

Join the #1 Electrician Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

ElectricianTalk.com - Are you a Professional Electrical Contractor? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's the leading place for electricians to meet online. No homeowners asking DIY questions. Just fellow tradesmen who enjoy talking about their business, their trade, and anything else that comes up. No matter what your specialty is you'll find that ElectricianTalk.com is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free!

Join ElectricianTalk.com - Click Here JOIN FOR FREE


Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ElectricianTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-24-2016, 06:09 PM   #22
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Haymarket VA
Posts: 183
Rewards Points: 366
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by khfiei View Post

One problem associated with IR testing is that most of the time, the (fixed) electrical load is too low to give an adequate IR reading on a bad connection, and a good visual inspection along with a physical check of wire connections, etc. is more useful.
Thats why a repair should be completed by a firm that has experience dealing with this type of work that utilizes several methods to verify repairs.

1. FOP prior to and after repair.
2. Utilize a DLRO/Ductor/MIcro-ohm meter prior to and after repair.
3. Regular IR inspections
Brain John is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2016, 06:12 PM   #23
Donuts > Fried Eggs
 
Big John's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Portland
Posts: 17,054
Rewards Points: 300
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by khfiei View Post
One problem associated with IR testing is that most of the time, the (fixed) electrical load is too low to give an adequate IR reading on a bad connection....
I once had a customer seriously misunderstand what IR was all about and they scheduled a damn complete plant outage for me to show up and do my survey. Place usually drew about 30 megawatts, and I show up to discover they're running on minimal standby of a couple hundred kW.

IR is absolutely a valuable tool. Literally almost every survey I do, I find deficiencies. But I agree, someone has to know what they're looking at. I've seen fly-by-night outfits flag their own reflection as an electrical problem.
LuckyLuke likes this.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Always wear your gloves.
Big John is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Big John For This Useful Post:
Brain John (07-24-2016)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-24-2016, 07:15 PM   #24
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Haymarket VA
Posts: 183
Rewards Points: 366
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big John View Post
I once had a customer seriously misunderstand what IR was all about and they scheduled a damn complete plant outage for me to show up and do my survey. Place usually drew about 30 megawatts, and I show up to discover they're running on minimal standby of a couple hundred kW.

IR is absolutely a valuable tool. Literally almost every survey I do, I find deficiencies. But I agree, someone has to know what they're looking at. I've seen fly-by-night outfits flag their own reflection as an electrical problem.
Read a Spec that required an IR at no load and full load. I tried to explain that at no load there is no temperature differential and all you get one color. It was spec'd so we got paid to do the IR twice.
Big John likes this.
Brain John is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2016, 07:21 PM   #25
Trained Monkey
 
TheLivingBubba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: In a van down by the river.
Posts: 325
Rewards Points: 390
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brain John View Post
Read a Spec that required an IR at no load and full load. I tried to explain that at no load there is no temperature differential and all you get one color. It was spec'd so we got paid to do the IR twice.
Could it have been to build a baseline for qualitative data? Track the loss of efficiency in equipment and try to establish a timeline for repairs and replacement?

Just throwing stuff at the wall wondering why.
TheLivingBubba is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2016, 07:46 PM   #26
Donuts > Fried Eggs
 
Big John's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Portland
Posts: 17,054
Rewards Points: 300
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLivingBubba View Post
Could it have been to build a baseline for qualitative data...?
It doesn't show anything. Surveying an energized piece of switchgear at no load might as well be like surveying a piece of sheetrock: There's no thermal gradient to see, barring small emissivity differences, it all looks like one color.

Just a case of folks writing boilerplate scopes.

The only time we see a couple surveys requested like that is one on the day of startup to find critical problems, and one several weeks later for more minor issues.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Always wear your gloves.
Big John is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2016, 12:05 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: MO
Posts: 884
Rewards Points: 698
Default

Thank you for all the advice. I suppose I will proceed and see if I get the job. I can do the infrared scan and document the heat signatures of the components. If anything seems suspect we will do an fop test if appropriate. If the fop test varies by more than 50% we will recommend repair or replacement. I was looking at a dlor meter but I really don't know that I would use it enough to justify.
garfield is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2016, 12:48 AM   #28
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Portland
Posts: 18
Rewards Points: 28
Default 2 things to remember..

You can gather all the know-how on doing a scan and how to convey what's there to your customer, but I think it's really important to have a fair amount of legalese in the report. CYA. Talk to your attorney about what to say.

Figure out how to roll the cost(s) of certifying your techs into the first job(s).
~48~ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2016, 02:09 AM   #29
Old Grumpy Bastard
 
MechanicalDVR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Old Dominion"
Posts: 59,296
Rewards Points: 1,008
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~48~ View Post
You can gather all the know-how on doing a scan and how to convey what's there to your customer, but I think it's really important to have a fair amount of legalese in the report. CYA. Talk to your attorney about what to say.

Figure out how to roll the cost(s) of certifying your techs into the first job(s).
Great advice.
__________________
I'm as Christian as possible in the times we live in.

Always just a stallion in a china shop
MechanicalDVR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Working under a homeowners permit? TechieBecky General Electrical Discussion 16 03-16-2016 12:26 AM
Infrared tube heater acro Off Topic (Non Trade) 9 02-24-2016 05:39 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com