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Old 10-06-2018, 12:09 PM   #1
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Default License question

Sorry if this is the wrong thread to post this question to. I am an experienced electrician who just moved to the US. I have a degree in electrical engineering. How can I obtain the license without having to go through apprenticeships?
Thanks in advance.
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Old 10-06-2018, 12:11 PM   #2
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From where is your experience?
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Old 10-06-2018, 12:18 PM   #3
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There is no national license. The license depends on your state, county, or even town. No one can give you an answer unless they know where you are from.

Some places require work in their jurisdiction, so even if you worked in a neighboring state for 20 years you would have to work in that state for enough years to qualify.
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Old 10-06-2018, 12:27 PM   #4
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@zerop please fill in your profile.
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Old 10-06-2018, 05:56 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by zerop View Post
Sorry if this is the wrong thread to post this question to. I am an experienced electrician who just moved to the US. I have a degree in electrical engineering. How can I obtain the license without having to go through apprenticeships?
Thanks in advance.
Electrical Engineer is a very broad field.
You might have worked on guided missile systems, designed circuit boards, pump controls, antennas, who knows.
The Engineers with the most relevance in the construction trades are a PE.
Our trade is all about field experience, specifically a good solid 3-5 years before you can have enough knowledge to work without close supervision.
You might have to look very hard to find a licensing jurisdiction that will hand you a license based on a EE degree.
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Old 10-06-2018, 06:14 PM   #6
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The Engineers with the most relevance in the construction trades are a PE.
By PE do you mean the same engineers that can stamp prints?
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Old 10-06-2018, 10:03 PM   #7
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You can sub an bachelors engineering degree for contractor in many states, with a very little trade experience accompaniment
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Old 10-06-2018, 10:31 PM   #8
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I have yet to meet an an electrical engineer that knew anything about being an electrician.

Fill out your profile. Please.
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Old 10-06-2018, 10:35 PM   #9
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Quote:
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The Engineers with the most relevance in the construction trades are a PE.
By PE do you mean the same engineers that can stamp prints?
To become licensed, engineers must complete a four-year college degree, work under a Professional Engineer (PE) for at least four years, pass two intensive competency exams and earn a license from their state's licensure board. Then, to retain their licenses, PEs must continually maintain and improve their skills throughout their careers. I believe they trump an inspector As the ahj.
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Old 10-06-2018, 10:42 PM   #10
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I have yet to meet an an electrical engineer that knew anything about being an electrician.

Fill out your profile. Please.
I'm two (difficult) classes away from my bachelors in electrical engineering.

I love to meet customers that say something to the tune of "If you can just get the permit and set the meter and main panel, I can wire the rest of the house, I'm an electrical engineer."

My response is usually something of "You're an electrical engineer? That's cool! I'm just finishing up my bachelors in EE. Gosh, it's so hard! Classes must have been different back in the day when you went, I thought having my electrical contracting license and all this field experience would make it a breeze, but man, none of the classes have been anything anywhere near related to wiring houses!!!"
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Old 10-07-2018, 05:21 AM   #11
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I have yet to meet an an electrical engineer that knew anything about being an electrician.

Fill out your profile. Please.
I was a young journeyman on a residential condo remodel. The customer was an EE. He asked me very seriously if I was wiring the recessed lighting in series or parallel.
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Old 10-07-2018, 08:05 AM   #12
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there's been a few houses I worked on that had wiring done by EEs

the main defect I remember

is they did not seem familiar with concept of box connectors
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Old 10-07-2018, 08:06 AM   #13
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or boxes!
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Old 10-19-2018, 08:59 AM   #14
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Yeah them EE's tend to over think the situation at hand from not knowing the Code or wiring specifics.
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Old 10-19-2018, 11:24 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by John Valdes View Post
I have yet to meet an an electrical engineer that knew anything about being an electrician.

Fill out your profile. Please.
We haven’t met yet...

But I know what you mean. I was an electrician FIRST, that’s the only reason I know anything useful when it comes to what electricians do for a living. I can’t even count the number of times I’ve seen some piece of “brilliant” engineering and thought “That POS was designed by someone who has NEVER had to work in the field...”. My pet peeve is designs that end up being totally legal from a code /UL perspective, but are so crammed full of stuff in as small a space as possible that there is no way to connect anything without drawing blood. I’m not doing a lot of design work any more, but when I did, electricians loved how I laid things out and I owe that to my experience AS an electrician, not my degree.
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Old 10-19-2018, 11:32 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by John Valdes View Post
I have yet to meet an an electrical engineer that knew anything about being an electrician.

Fill out your profile. Please.
I have worked with a few BUT those guys put themselves through college working as electricians helpers and stuck with the trade until that debt was paid off. Their starting salary was less as a PE than it was as a journeyman.
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Old 10-19-2018, 12:38 PM   #17
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We havenít met yet...

But I know what you mean. I was an electrician FIRST, thatís the only reason I know anything useful when it comes to what electricians do for a living. I canít even count the number of times Iíve seen some piece of ďbrilliantĒ engineering and thought ďThat POS was designed by someone who has NEVER had to work in the field...Ē. My pet peeve is designs that end up being totally legal from a code /UL perspective, but are so crammed full of stuff in as small a space as possible that there is no way to connect anything without drawing blood. Iím not doing a lot of design work any more, but when I did, electricians loved how I laid things out and I owe that to my experience AS an electrician, not my degree.
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I have worked with a few BUT those guys put themselves through college working as electricians helpers and stuck with the trade until that debt was paid off. Their starting salary was less as a PE than it was as a journeyman.
Agree. I was speaking from personal experience. But if the engineer has had some time doing electrical work, he is just that more valuable.

It always seemed it was mechanical engineers that I always worked under. Maintenance supervisor types.
These guys were usually fresh out of college and knew electrical theory, but had no actually hands on experience.
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Old 10-19-2018, 12:56 PM   #18
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Pennsylvania will take anyone, no license required for state, only contractors license. Some local cities do want your money.
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Old 10-19-2018, 05:38 PM   #19
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OP

If you're in Ohio , your EE degree automatically qualifies you
for the state license.

Don't know about other states
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Old 10-19-2018, 06:08 PM   #20
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To become licensed, engineers must complete a four-year college degree, work under a Professional Engineer (PE) for at least four years, pass two intensive competency exams and earn a license from their state's licensure board. Then, to retain their licenses, PEs must continually maintain and improve their skills throughout their careers. I believe they trump an inspector As the ahj.
And most likely none of their training has been on the electrical code.

They most definitely do not trump the inspector or AHJ.
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