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Old 06-05-2007, 07:15 AM   #1
 
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Default Plastering Over Crimped Cables ?

Hi
I am having a new kitchen fitted and the electrican has done the following;

1) Removed an unwanted socket, crimped the wires together (see photo 1) and put some insulation tape around the joints. He says this is now safe to plaster over. The wires can be found under the floorboards upstairs where a junction could have been fitted, would this have been a better option ?

2) Jointed a cable together, crimped and insulation tape - again to be plastered - is this safe and good practice ? (see photo 2)

I have my own electrician doing other rooms in my house who says he shouldn't have done this and there were other methods available - who do I believe !!Please help.

Thanks
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Old 06-05-2007, 05:21 PM   #2
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Default Ouch

Oh my, It is illegal to barry electrical boxes in the walls its not only a fire hazard but if anything went wrong with the circuit then what?

In most cases the wires can be relocated to an accesible area or a new installation needs to happen!

If were my house I woould not allow poor workmanship like so.
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Old 06-05-2007, 05:21 PM   #3
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Where are you? UK?
In the US it is required for all splices, junctions, etc to be accessable. Plastering over would be a violation.
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Old 06-05-2007, 05:52 PM   #4
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I'm just now getting into reading the UK code, so I'm not sure if that's legal there or not, but I seriously doubt it. I note you UK style box. I think the guy who put on crimp terminals and told you to plaster over them is a nut job.

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Old 06-05-2007, 05:55 PM   #5
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I changed my mind. I left this thread open. I see that the OP is a "project manager". I'm not sure what that means in the UK, but here in the states it means the person is a construction professional, so I guess it's okay for now.
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Old 06-05-2007, 06:06 PM   #6
 
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If you crimp or solder joints in the UK you then have to shrink wrap to double insulate them and then they are allowed to be inaccessible, such as under floors. Conversely JB's are not allowed where they are inaccessible. Insulating tape is not acceptable, but shrink wrap is. The crimp joint would have to be made with good ratchet crimps and pulled very hard on to ensure it is a good joint.
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Old 06-05-2007, 07:31 PM   #7
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I'm glad you left this thread open Marc. That is an interesting piece of info. Thanks Paul.
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Old 06-05-2007, 08:15 PM   #8
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The UK switch box that part i will not really say too much because the regulations did change a bit

for splicing the wire in UK that is allow as what Paul saying,.. it is the same with French electrical system as well but the French electrical system is slowly getting better now as i am speaking we have few diffrent codes " imported " from few areas like UK , USA [ NEC Codes ] and few others as well so it pretty instering to see it.

Merci , Marc
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Old 06-06-2007, 01:56 PM   #9
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Bad practice overall. but at a pinch Paul is correct. I would not be happy to do this myself. It seems so much easier to pull the cables back into the floor space above and terminate there. But why not pull back and make another accessory outlet. Even if it was at hight level it could be made use of at some point.At the very least a blank dual cover plate could be mounted on the accessory box and suface fixed of course. Not plastered over.

In any event. Do not leave as is.

Frank
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Old 06-06-2007, 07:42 PM   #10
 
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Yes I would blank it off too.
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Old 06-10-2007, 10:58 PM   #11
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In the US we are also not allowed to embed non metalic cable in plaster, let alone burying up a splice in it.
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