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Old 01-20-2015, 07:06 AM   #1
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Default Question about reactive magnetic field in an induction motor

I have found in a book something about a reactive field in an induction motor that rotates with a specific speed relative to the rotor and another speed relative to the stator(I'm guessing it's about the stator's magnetic field). I don't remember the equations specifically since I don't have the book at me but what is the reactive field.
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Old 01-20-2015, 07:30 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Cantafford View Post
I have found in a book something about a reactive field in an induction motor that rotates with a specific speed relative to the rotor and another speed relative to the stator(I'm guessing it's about the stator's magnetic field). I don't remember the equations specifically since I don't have the book at me but what is the reactive field.
The property of self-inductance is a particular form of electromagnetic induction. Self inductance is defined as the induction of a voltage in a current-carrying wire when the current in the wire itself is changing. In the case of self-inductance, the magnetic field created by a changing current in the circuit itself induces a voltage in the same circuit. Therefore, the voltage is self-induced.
The term inductor is used to describe a circuit element possessing the property of inductance and a coil of wire is a very common inductor. In circuit diagrams, a coil or wire is usually used to indicate an inductive component. Taking a closer look at a coil will help understand the reason that a voltage is induced in a wire carrying a changing current. The alternating current running through the coil creates a magnetic field in and around the coil that is increasing and decreasing as the current changes. The magnetic field forms concentric loops that surround the wire and join to form larger loops that surround the coil as shown in the image below. When the current increases in one loop the expanding magnetic field will cut across some or all of the neighboring loops of wire, inducing a voltage in these loops. This causes a voltage to be induced in the coil when the current is changing.
By studying this image of a coil, it can be seen that the number of turns in the coil will have an effect on the amount of voltage that is induced into the circuit. Increasing the number of turns or the rate of change of magnetic flux increases the amount of induced voltage. Therefore, Faraday's Law must be modified for a coil of wire and becomes the following.
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