Resistance and splicing - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum > Electrical Forum > General Electrical Discussion


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-21-2015, 12:37 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: ca
Posts: 8
Rewards Points: 24
Default Resistance and splicing

Can someone please explain to me how resistance is affected when there is too many splices on a circuit. Thanks
cj8278 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join Contractor Talk

Join the #1 Electrician Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

ElectricianTalk.com - Are you a Professional Electrical Contractor? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's the leading place for electricians to meet online. No homeowners asking DIY questions. Just fellow tradesmen who enjoy talking about their business, their trade, and anything else that comes up. No matter what your specialty is you'll find that ElectricianTalk.com is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free!

Join ElectricianTalk.com - Click Here JOIN FOR FREE


Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ElectricianTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-21-2015, 01:08 PM   #2
Senile Member
 
macmikeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Honolulu
Posts: 27,951
Rewards Points: 18,265
Default

Put a bunch of split bolts in a circuit, tighten them down to the correct torque and install properly and the resistance of the circuit will go down.......
__________________
JOBS GROWTH SOARS
RECORD WORKING
UNEMPLOYMENT 50-YEAR LOW
Drudge Report
macmikeman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 01:29 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: IL
Posts: 3,838
Rewards Points: 1,224
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by macmikeman View Post
Put a bunch of split bolts in a circuit, tighten them down to the correct torque and install properly and the resistance of the circuit will go down.......
Can you cite a source for that?
don_resqcapt19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-21-2015, 03:23 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Fleetside, RI
Posts: 701
Rewards Points: 1,367
Default

Depends on the splice, could make resistance go up or down
samgregger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 05:52 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Indiana
Posts: 2,219
Rewards Points: 2,950
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cj8278
Can someone please explain to me how resistance is affected when there is too many splices on a circuit. Thanks
It all depends on how good/bad the splice is. It may have absolutely no affect at all, and shouldn't if it is done correctly.
btharmy is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to btharmy For This Useful Post:
TheWireNut (02-21-2015)
Old 02-21-2015, 06:20 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Northern Maine
Posts: 158
Rewards Points: 265
Default

I would argue that a proper splice should have negligible resistance. What kind of splice are you talking about? Low med or high voltage?

TWN
TheWireNut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 08:55 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
NacBooster29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Southern, Ma
Posts: 2,536
Rewards Points: 1,018
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by macmikeman View Post
Put a bunch of split bolts in a circuit, tighten them down to the correct torque and install properly and the resistance of the circuit will go down.......
I'm calling bs. No way it would drop.
NacBooster29 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to NacBooster29 For This Useful Post:
millelec (02-27-2015), samgregger (02-21-2015)
Old 02-21-2015, 09:03 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Fleetside, RI
Posts: 701
Rewards Points: 1,367
Default

The only way it would go down is if your splice made the wire shorter, like a wire was cut and you spliced it with a split bolt and overlapped a lot of material.

The only way it would make it go up is if you added material or used a spice material with a resistance greater than your conductor, like a steel crimp on copper wire.
samgregger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 09:07 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: NOYB
Posts: 4,665
Rewards Points: 4
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NacBooster29 View Post
I'm calling bs. No way it would drop.

Same here.

The resistance of the wire for a given length will always be a constant, and splices will almost always (90+ % of the time) add a very small (or large if corroded or poorly made) amount of resistance to the overall resistance of the conductor. There is no way the addition of splices will cause a drop in resistance.

About the only way to drop the resistance of a conductor (and MAYBE the splice(s) ) is to supercool it.
guest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 11:35 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Ohio
Posts: 254
Rewards Points: 419
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by macmikeman View Post
Put a bunch of split bolts in a circuit, tighten them down to the correct torque and install properly and the resistance of the circuit will go down.......
In comparison to....conductors in free air with no physical connection?

Unless you're being sarcastic, I fail to understand your logic.

Last edited by mikey383; 02-21-2015 at 11:38 PM.
mikey383 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2015, 11:51 PM   #11
Senile Member
 
macmikeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Honolulu
Posts: 27,951
Rewards Points: 18,265
Default

You are cutting the wire, and striping an inch or two of insulation off, and then joining the wire together again in the split bolt. Now you have shortened the conductor, and split bolts done properly will hold the now shorter sections of wire together without loss of voltage across the splice. Ask a Burndy engineer, they will confirm. So although it won't be a great reduction, it will be a reduction. Class dismissed. There is going to be a test on Tuesday so make sure to read all the way thru chapter three.
__________________
JOBS GROWTH SOARS
RECORD WORKING
UNEMPLOYMENT 50-YEAR LOW
Drudge Report
macmikeman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 12:28 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: IL
Posts: 3,838
Rewards Points: 1,224
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by macmikeman View Post
You are cutting the wire, and striping an inch or two of insulation off, and then joining the wire together again in the split bolt. Now you have shortened the conductor, and split bolts done properly will hold the now shorter sections of wire together without loss of voltage across the splice. Ask a Burndy engineer, they will confirm. So although it won't be a great reduction, it will be a reduction. Class dismissed. There is going to be a test on Tuesday so make sure to read all the way thru chapter three.
There is no way that the splice itself has lowered the resistance. Now if you have shortened the total length, sure, but that is not because the split bolt connection has reduced the resistance.

The resistance of the connection may approach that of the the unspliced conductor, but it will always be higher.
don_resqcapt19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 12:42 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Ohio
Posts: 254
Rewards Points: 419
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by macmikeman View Post
You are cutting the wire, and striping an inch or two of insulation off, and then joining the wire together again in the split bolt. Now you have shortened the conductor, and split bolts done properly will hold the now shorter sections of wire together without loss of voltage across the splice. Ask a Burndy engineer, they will confirm. So although it won't be a great reduction, it will be a reduction. Class dismissed. There is going to be a test on Tuesday so make sure to read all the way thru chapter three.
There is no possible way that a splice can be made where the resistance is lower than if the conductor hadn't been spliced.

Last edited by mikey383; 02-22-2015 at 12:44 AM.
mikey383 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to mikey383 For This Useful Post:
guest (02-22-2015)
Old 02-22-2015, 05:30 AM   #14
Very Long Vacation
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: united states of america
Posts: 11,766
Rewards Points: 5,262
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mxslick View Post
Same here.

The resistance of the wire for a given length will always be a constant, and splices will almost always (90+ % of the time) add a very small (or large if corroded or poorly made) amount of resistance to the overall resistance of the conductor. There is no way the addition of splices will cause a drop in resistance.

About the only way to drop the resistance of a conductor (and MAYBE the splice(s) ) is to supercool it.
A properly done splice will contribute unnoticeable resistance. But any real loss, something for example that generates one, one/half or 1/4 of a volt in voltage drop across the splice is a server fire hazard. At that point you would have a glowing connection.

Last edited by meadow; 02-22-2015 at 05:32 AM.
meadow is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to meadow For This Useful Post:
guest (02-22-2015)
Old 02-22-2015, 09:27 AM   #15
Sparks fly from my finger
 
Jhellwig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ottumwa, Ia
Posts: 2,456
Rewards Points: 4,529
Default

Maybe if someone could break out a micro ohm meter we could get to the bottom of this.
__________________
Murphy's law is a pain in my butt.
Jhellwig is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Jhellwig For This Useful Post:
BuzzKill (02-22-2015), guest (02-22-2015), John Valdes (02-22-2015)
Old 02-22-2015, 10:19 AM   #16
evil bastard
 
mcclary's electrical's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: State of Euphoria
Posts: 15,771
Rewards Points: 746
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by macmikeman View Post
Put a bunch of split bolts in a circuit, tighten them down to the correct torque and install properly and the resistance of the circuit will go down.......
I very very seriously doubt that
mcclary's electrical is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 11:47 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
cuba_pete's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Washington State
Posts: 1,637
Rewards Points: 3,005
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by macmikeman View Post
...Class dismissed. There is going to be a test on Tuesday so make sure to read all the way thru chapter three.
Nice try...this wool is making my face itchy, though.
cuba_pete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 12:07 PM   #18
Very Long Vacation
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: united states of america
Posts: 11,766
Rewards Points: 5,262
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcclary's electrical View Post
I very very seriously doubt that
Wheres BigJohn or Badelectrican when you need them?
meadow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 12:43 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Tapeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 178
Rewards Points: 135
Default

Splices don't make resistance go down, period.
__________________
Retired without ever breaking Ohm's Law.
Tapeman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Tapeman For This Useful Post:
guest (02-22-2015)
Old 02-22-2015, 02:39 PM   #20
Senile Member
 
macmikeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Honolulu
Posts: 27,951
Rewards Points: 18,265
Default

So far it is your conjecture vs my conjecture. At least I have spoken to Burndy about this in the past, and while they man was somewhat cadgey because of the fact that almost no one in our trade will properly install split bolts, so mostly they will add resistance, he maintained that there will be no added resistance to a proper bolted connection. I just don't remember his name sadly. I did this using google about a half decade back maybe to get to that source, so get your engines going, and lets get the proof and dunk the macmikeman into the water. Or not....
__________________
JOBS GROWTH SOARS
RECORD WORKING
UNEMPLOYMENT 50-YEAR LOW
Drudge Report
macmikeman is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Torque vs resistance Cantafford General Electrical Discussion 6 02-19-2015 12:07 PM
[email protected] 95 from Resistance @35 bibincjoy General Electrical Discussion 3 07-18-2014 03:26 PM
UF splicing brichter General Electrical Discussion 14 05-26-2014 06:11 PM
high resistance? 3tigerz Services and Service Equipment 8 04-18-2009 01:52 PM
high resistance? 3tigerz Site Help and Suggestions 3 04-09-2009 04:34 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com