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Old 02-22-2015, 02:59 PM   #21
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Are we talking about wire nuts, or soldered split sleeve on a paper insulated lead cable? What is the method and voltage etc? If the splicer is good, it should be negligible. If the splicer is really just a hack, you will have higher resistance due to improper cable prep, over or under torquing, wrong crimp die, bird caging of conductor, air voids, over insulation, water in the cable, oxide removal and prevention.... It's a long list.
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Old 02-22-2015, 03:15 PM   #22
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Ok what I think Macmikeman is try to say is that at the split bolt connection, if properly installed, the total volume of the cable is doubled at least for a short length. In which case the resistance does go down. Now here me out. It is negligible, but if you think about a #12 and a #10 of equal distance, the #10 has less total resistance. The reason you upsize for VD. Ok now what if you had a #12 with multiple spots (splices) where the volume of the conductor is increased for short lengths to essentially #10. The total resistance of the circuit would be less than an equal length #12 and more than an equal length #10.
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Old 02-22-2015, 03:18 PM   #23
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How clean is the connection? Over time, will it oxidize? Is it soldered? Exposed ? Pretty vague imo. Bad splices can certainly add resistance, but properly done, there should be zero added resistance.


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Old 02-22-2015, 03:23 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by JW Splicer View Post
Ok what I think Macmikeman is try to say is that at the split bolt connection, if properly installed, the total volume of the cable is doubled at least for a short length. In which case the resistance does go down. Now here me out. It is negligible, but if you think about a #12 and a #10 of equal distance, the #10 has less total resistance. The reason you upsize for VD. Ok now what if you had a #12 with multiple spots (splices) where the volume of the conductor is increased for short lengths to essentially #10. The total resistance of the circuit would be less than an equal length #12 and more than an equal length #10.
I don't believe that for a moment
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Old 02-22-2015, 03:23 PM   #25
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How clean is the connection? Over time, will it oxidize? Is it soldered? Exposed ? Pretty vague imo. Bad splices can certainly add resistance, but properly done, there should be zero added resistance.


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Myself, I won't go so far as to say zero, but given the original content of the thread, the shortening of the overall length of conductor in the subject of this thread is by far the greater of the reduction of resistance vs the micro addition of resistance, when properly installed.

It is just to much for the non illuminati believers to grasp.
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Old 02-22-2015, 03:24 PM   #26
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So far it is your conjecture vs my conjecture. At least I have spoken to Burndy about this in the past, and while they man was somewhat cadgey because of the fact that almost no one in our trade will properly install split bolts, so mostly they will add resistance, he maintained that there will be no added resistance to a proper bolted connection. I just don't remember his name sadly. I did this using google about a half decade back maybe to get to that source, so get your engines going, and lets get the proof and dunk the macmikeman into the water. Or not....
A salesman from Burndy?

The second part is true, no added resistance to a proper bolted connection!

Still a fun thread to follow!

Borgi

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Old 02-22-2015, 03:32 PM   #27
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I don't believe that for a moment
Perfect world, we are in anything but. Even copper oxidizes and there is probably some galvanic action between the split bolt/wire nut or whatever. Real world scenario the resistance will most likely go up due to external factors.
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Old 02-26-2015, 02:32 AM   #28
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Depending on the splices it will make the resistance go up or down, if you make sure the splices are tight the resistance will go down. So basically depending on the quality of your work.
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Old 02-26-2015, 02:42 AM   #29
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Can you cite a source for that?
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Old 02-26-2015, 02:47 AM   #30
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Who here would argue that this splice will increase the resistance of the cable? We assume that it was done properly - oxide removed and then glyped and taped.

If resistance is based on total cross sectional area, the splice should technically have a lower resistance given that the cable is twice the diameter at the splice.



Here is a graph of a splice that is soft soldered together. One can see that as the cable overlap increases, the overall resistance does decrease (in the nOhm range though). This chart shows the resistance of the splice itself, not the overall cable which is important.


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Old 02-26-2015, 02:48 AM   #31
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There is no way that the splice itself has lowered the resistance. Now if you have shortened the total length, sure, but that is not because the split bolt connection has reduced the resistance.

The resistance of the connection may approach that of the the unspliced conductor, but it will always be higher.
There will be twice the circular mills of copper at the area of the splice.

Negligible but I think he who believes in the illuminati has a point.
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Old 02-26-2015, 01:46 PM   #32
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There will be twice the circular mills of copper at the area of the splice.

Negligible but I think he who believes in the illuminati has a point.
Sure there is increased area, but there is also the connection between the two cables. I just don't see that as being a zero ohm connection.
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Old 02-26-2015, 03:28 PM   #33
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There won't be any Resistance cause the wire is too short now.
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Old 02-26-2015, 04:45 PM   #34
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~CS~
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Old 02-27-2015, 01:50 AM   #35
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Im giving out mostly ''F'''s here, one or two ''A'''s and an A+. Class is dismissed.
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Old 02-27-2015, 02:19 AM   #36
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Who here would argue that this splice will increase the resistance of the cable? We assume that it was done properly - oxide removed and then glyped and taped.

If resistance is based on total cross sectional area, the splice should technically have a lower resistance given that the cable is twice the diameter at the splice.



Here is a graph of a splice that is soft soldered together. One can see that as the cable overlap increases, the overall resistance does decrease (in the nOhm range though). This chart shows the resistance of the splice itself, not the overall cable which is important.



Basically paralleling high Z paths to get one low one?
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Old 02-27-2015, 02:44 AM   #37
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Basically paralleling high Z paths to get one low one?
Or too low Z paths to get a low one
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Old 02-27-2015, 10:42 AM   #38
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Theoretically, I think there would be more resistance in a splice if the wire was already at its maximum ampacity but otherwise I can't imagine any difference. If the wire was loaded to capacity I would think there would be some minscule increase in resistance as electron flow was diverted through the splice. I am not saying it would be measurable, just that I can see it existing. JMO fire away
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Old 02-27-2015, 11:36 AM   #39
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Theoretically, I think there would be more resistance in a splice if the wire was already at its maximum ampacity but otherwise I can't imagine any difference. If the wire was loaded to capacity I would think there would be some minscule increase in resistance as electron flow was diverted through the splice. I am not saying it would be measurable, just that I can see it existing. JMO fire away
By that thinking, stranded wire would be a mess of impedence. On the contrary, splitting up a conductor into the strands lowers resistance.
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Old 02-27-2015, 11:45 AM   #40
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So far it is your conjecture vs my conjecture. At least I have spoken to Burndy about this in the past, and while they man was somewhat cadgey because of the fact that almost no one in our trade will properly install split bolts, so mostly they will add resistance, he maintained that there will be no added resistance to a proper bolted connection. I just don't remember his name sadly. I did this using google about a half decade back maybe to get to that source, so get your engines going, and lets get the proof and dunk the macmikeman into the water. Or not....
For clarity, what's your take on properly installed split bolt?
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