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Old 08-11-2016, 10:07 AM   #61
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Snap-On "EXDL 10" or its equivalent.

Left Hand Cobalt Drill-Extractor Set


Not cheap, BTW.

&&&&&&

Auto body professionals have a trick spot welder that attaches studs to injured metal body forms.

These studs are then craftily pulled back and out until the original form has largely been restored.

Then they are snapped off and the connection ground flush.

The entire scheme is dialled in for the thin, high-strength steels now in mass use.

There are things on my Dodge that I'd kick to the pros -- your situation is something that I would not attempt myself. I just don't care to purchase the trick tools for a one-shot problem. I know that I can't bring any specific hand skills to the task.

I'd punt.
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Old 08-11-2016, 10:37 AM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by telsa View Post
Snap-On "EXDL 10" or its equivalent.

Left Hand Cobalt Drill-Extractor Set


Not cheap, BTW.

&&&&&&

Auto body professionals have a trick spot welder that attaches studs to injured metal body forms.

These studs are then craftily pulled back and out until the original form has largely been restored.

Then they are snapped off and the connection ground flush.

The entire scheme is dialled in for the thin, high-strength steels now in mass use.
These are just adapted pin spotters that insulators use to stick insulation on ductwork. I thought it was long over due when I first saw them. Prior to that technology they drill 1/8" holes and used screws or a slidehammer to pull out dents.
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Old 08-11-2016, 03:57 PM   #63
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I have broken off "easy out" screw extractors. Talk about making a problem worse... but I've never used the type that come with their own drill bit, those look promising.

But SOAK that puppy in Liquid Wrench for a few hours before attempting it. When I used to dismantle antique cars at a junk yard, we used Oil of Wintegreen as a penetrant, I think it worked better than Liquid Wrench, and smelled better. But it's hard to find any more. Sometimes I see it in pharmacies though.

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We've got plenty of bears here in NJ, too many. But the stupid animal people complain when we have a bear hunt.
There is a big "bear" population in SF as well, but I don't think they are breaking into cars unless there in someone in there they want...


"Bear hunt" has a totally different meaning around here too...
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Old 08-11-2016, 09:50 PM   #64
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I have broken off "easy out" screw extractors. Talk about making a problem worse... but I've never used the type that come with their own drill bit, those look promising.

But SOAK that puppy in Liquid Wrench for a few hours before attempting it. When I used to dismantle antique cars at a junk yard, we used Oil of Wintegreen as a penetrant, I think it worked better than Liquid Wrench, and smelled better. But it's hard to find any more. Sometimes I see it in pharmacies though.
Oil of winter green is 'methyl salicylate' and is common. Walmart carries oil of wintergreen fairly inexpensively. Runs maybe $10 a pint.
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Old 08-12-2016, 05:09 PM   #65
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Oil of winter green is 'methyl salicylate' and is common. Walmart carries oil of wintergreen fairly inexpensively. Runs maybe $10 a pint.
Huh, never bothered to check into that, thanks!

Just read the Wiki on it, very interesting. I had no idea it had so many other uses, but most of them pharmacological. That explains why I still see it in drug stores. No mention of it being a rust buster though. And now I'm thinking I may have dodged a bullet after reading that some athlete DIED from using too much muscle pain creme that had it as an ingredient. We used it straight out of a gallon jug, even washed our hand with it at the end of the day. Nobody said anything about it getting absorbed and killing us! Whew...
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Old 08-12-2016, 05:22 PM   #66
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Huh, never bothered to check into that, thanks!

Just read the Wiki on it, very interesting. I had no idea it had so many other uses, but most of them pharmacological. That explains why I still see it in drug stores. No mention of it being a rust buster though. And now I'm thinking I may have dodged a bullet after reading that some athlete DIED from using too much muscle pain creme that had it as an ingredient. We used it straight out of a gallon jug, even washed our hand with it at the end of the day. Nobody said anything about it getting absorbed and killing us! Whew...
My Grandmom came from Scotland and always had different oils and things in the house. Lavender oil, wintergreen oil, cod liver oil, witch hazel, etc, they all had a use. Now that I'm an old guy and read more, it seems all those things are the 'natural' way to fix or cure things. Lavender oil keeps mosquitoes off you, peppermint oil rids your dog of fleas, witch hazel is the best astringent, and the list goes on. Funny how it seems those old timers were smarter than we give them credit for.
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Old 08-12-2016, 05:30 PM   #67
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I have this set.

https://store.snapon.com/Product-Det...B-P644746.aspx

And this.

https://store.snapon.com/Impact-Driv...t-P631487.aspx

Between those a grinder and welder no bolt or screw stands a chance with me.

Mig welder on a low setting can get out as small as a #10 bolt.
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Old 08-13-2016, 04:11 AM   #68
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Snap-on is always good stuff but always very expensive.
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Old 08-13-2016, 12:56 PM   #69
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Quote:
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Snap-on is always good stuff but always very expensive.
Snap On was what they gave me when I started my apprenticeship. A full rolling tool box of brand new Snap On tools.
I just signed on the line at the bottom of the form and they were mine to use as long as I worked there.
They replaced anything that broke.

I used to love seeing the Snap On tool truck pull up.
Guy would always show us the newest stuff and gave us a 1/2 hour or so to **** off.
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Old 08-13-2016, 01:05 PM   #70
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Snap On was what they gave me when I started my apprenticeship. A full rolling tool box of brand new Snap On tools.
I just signed on the line at the bottom of the form and they were mine to use as long as I worked there.
They replaced anything that broke.

I used to love seeing the Snap On tool truck pull up.
Guy would always show us the newest stuff and gave us a 1/2 hour or so to **** off.
Companies I've worked for that had tool cribs at the office bought from Snap-On and Mac Tools because they would stop at the shop weekly. I can honestly say I have never snapped a Snap On socket. I have busted many wrench type tools in my career. Ripped the veins open on the back of my left hand snapping a Craftsman pipe wrench and have been cautious since.
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