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Old 01-26-2018, 08:31 AM   #21
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Do you happen to know what amount of current will cause a GE inverse time circuit breaker to trip instantaneously? Do you know how long those particular motors produce their particular amount of startup current, or even if they do produce the amount of current required to throw the breaker? I don't. I do suppose this information might be obtained but I failed to do so... Alas, I probably should have erred on the side of caution rather than economy. The problem is now fixed.
I do know that running a breaker with a load of 80% plus for an extended period of time can cause it to fail.

Not knowing how long the pumps will run says 'don't do it to me'.

Glad you fixed it.
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Old 01-26-2018, 08:35 AM   #22
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20 amp CB 120-240 amps (6-12 times)

Sump pump depending on several factors 4-14 times.

4x9 ampsx2= 72 amps
14x9 ampsx2=252 amps

Shake the dice and see how it rolls out or install 2 circuits. It is your reputation on the line.
That is what is important to me, not looking like I took a guess.
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Old 01-26-2018, 07:02 PM   #23
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If your motors are only 1/2 hp ?
Then that would be 375W.
So at 10 x normal running current =3750w
3750w / 120v = 31.25A.
Even at 14 x that =5250W
5250W = 43.75A.
so a 30 or 40A breaker is required.

is it a 120v motor ?
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:53 PM   #24
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If your motors are only 1/2 hp ?
Then that would be 375W.
So at 10 x normal running current =3750w
3750w / 120v = 31.25A.
Even at 14 x that =5250W
5250W = 43.75A.
so a 30 or 40A breaker is required.

is it a 120v motor ?
DMX., just keep in your mind most sump pump in north Americian side typically 120 volts under 3/4 HP and most common size useally 1/4 or 1/3 HP is more common but yes there is few larger one for resdentail usage.

but anything over 3/4 HP useally go to straight 240 volts.
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Old 01-26-2018, 10:32 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmxtothemax View Post
If your motors are only 1/2 hp ?
Then that would be 375W.
So at 10 x normal running current =3750w
3750w / 120v = 31.25A.
Even at 14 x that =5250W
5250W = 43.75A.
so a 30 or 40A breaker is required.

is it a 120v motor ?
Yes, they are both 120V.
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Old 01-26-2018, 10:39 PM   #26
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Hill side homes are often the victim of under ground streams.

This one sounds like it's at serious risk.

You should suggest a French drain.
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Old 01-26-2018, 10:44 PM   #27
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Hill side homes are often the victim of under ground streams.

This one sounds like it's at serious risk.

You should suggest a French drain.
How about some pontoons? ... Seriously, it's in the middle of a large neighborhood, not on a steep slope, but it is on a higher part of the city if I am not mistaken.... I would have to really to go back and pay more close attention to know for sure... But, you are possibly right about the underground stream. Who knows for sure? ... Maybe the previous owner knows? Hmmm....

Last edited by Paul S.; 01-26-2018 at 10:46 PM.
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Old 01-27-2018, 08:14 AM   #28
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How about some pontoons? ... Seriously, it's in the middle of a large neighborhood, not on a steep slope, but it is on a higher part of the city if I am not mistaken.... I would have to really to go back and pay more close attention to know for sure... But, you are possibly right about the underground stream. Who knows for sure? ... Maybe the previous owner knows? Hmmm....
All irrelevant what matters is what you were hired for. All the rest can be small talk.
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Old 01-27-2018, 09:14 AM   #29
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Our new place is on about as level ground as you could ask for, but high water table. I have two maybe three sumps in our crawlspaces.
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Old 01-27-2018, 10:55 AM   #30
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Our new place is on about as level ground as you could ask for, but high water table. I have two maybe three sumps in our crawlspaces.
My backyard is always dry and never hold standing water anywhere yet on the other side of my fence looking east the property next door holds water for days after it rains and is always mushy to walk on.

Drainage and soil content are a funny thing.
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Old 01-27-2018, 10:59 AM   #31
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Most of our house is crawlspace with a small section of full basement. The previous owner lost a bunch of family history during one of the spring storms causing him to do a bunch of drainage work and pump installations. The crawlspace is all concrete and stays dry. Also a dehumidifier that's ugly, but keeps chugging along.
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