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Old 08-15-2012, 05:57 PM   #41
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I like sweeps. I never have problem pulling thru them. whatever floats your boat.
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Old 08-15-2012, 07:42 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparkypyro View Post
I think he means a short stub, not a reduced radius 90.
Yes, that is exactly what I meant.

Short radius 90's are to be avoided. In the rare cases where we are installing 1/2 rigid, we always bend it on the 3/4 shoe as the radius for 1/2" on a chicago bender is too tight to be usable.
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Old 08-15-2012, 08:08 PM   #43
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Short piece of rope through tristand leg up to pony ain't going no where 1/2 - 2 inch I'm lazy one hand on pony one Marlborough light in other with a little oil pump every now and then
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Old 08-15-2012, 11:59 PM   #44
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Wow, great thread. One thing that I think was touched on but easy to miss in all these posts is (depending on the type of run) - don't get ahead of yourself with securing the conduit super tight right away. As long as it doesn't impede measuring, temporary supports can be your friend; sometimes you'll need to hang a length or two down or otherwise pull it out of its run to spin that 90 or offset on.

edit: Oh and wear crappy clothes.
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Old 08-16-2012, 12:03 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by NacBooster29 View Post
We have the luxury of a rigid threading machine on wheels. It turns the pipe and the die stays stationary. The only downside is you cannot stick a short 90 in the jaw. You need at least 30" of straight pipe to thread. The pros of such a machine are that it dispenses oil for you. It has a reamer on it. It has a tubing virtue on it. Very nice tool. If you have a few grand pick one up.
Sounds like a Ridgid 535. We had one on one of our jobs (usually we get a 300), it was great not having to hand pump the oil.
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Old 08-16-2012, 09:52 AM   #46
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First off, use IMC in preference to RMC. It's a lot lighter.

Plan, plan, plan. Getall your supports set up in advance.

Make sure you can unplug the threader in a hurry, if it grabs you. Don't wear anything the threader can grab.

De-burr the pipe like a man posessed- especially if you're cutting the pipe with a pipe cutter of any sort.

Lay down some floor protection. A plastic tarp, covered by an absorbent canvas tarp, pig mat, or even cardboard will work. (Take care to keep things from slipping when you step on them) Probably the best way is to make a huge box - 8-ft. square for starters - and fill it with sand or kitty litter. It's all about catching the oil drips and metal chips.

Use LOTS of thread oil when cutting threads. Get the right oil - not just any oil will do. Also run your dies over any 'factory' threads, to remove any excess zinc coating.
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Old 08-16-2012, 10:17 AM   #47
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I like to put a little dab of noalox on the threads berfore I spin em together.
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Old 08-16-2012, 10:53 AM   #48
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worked a place where they specd 3m scotch cote
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Old 08-16-2012, 11:01 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denny3992 View Post
worked a place where they specd 3m scotch cote
on pipe threads? That's weird.
Scotchkote is for waterproofing taped up joints.

I worked in a refinery where they spec'd a type of pipe dope that was copper-colored and was to provide better conductivity. I don't even want to think how much that must cost these days.
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Old 08-16-2012, 11:32 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by bill39 View Post
on pipe threads? That's weird.
Scotchkote is for waterproofing taped up joints.

I worked in a refinery where they spec'd a type of pipe dope that was copper-colored and was to provide better conductivity. I don't even want to think how much that must cost these days.

Kopper-Kote? Budweiser had that for all RobRoy installations. Conductivity and helped against corrosion.
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Old 08-16-2012, 12:28 PM   #51
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Yea, Kopr-Kote is the Thomas & Betts, UL-listed version of a coper based anti-seize. The oil refinery probably had you use "C5-A," which is essentially the same product made by Henkel / Permatex. C5-A js not listed for electrical connections; Henkel dropped the effort after seeing the costs - their markets are not very interested in such a listing.

In any case, such products are not a 'pipe dope' in the usual sense. Rather, they keep threads from rusting together. Anti-seize compounds eventually evaporate, leaving a film of fine metal dust between pieces.

I can also understand someone using Scotch-Kote on assembled connections; perhaps for sealing, perhaps to help keep the threads from rusting. "Cut" metal will rust much quicker than metal with a 'mill finish.'
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Old 08-17-2012, 12:15 AM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amish Electrician
Yea, Kopr-Kote is the Thomas & Betts, UL-listed version of a coper based anti-seize. The oil refinery probably had you use "C5-A," which is essentially the same product made by Henkel / Permatex. C5-A js not listed for electrical connections; Henkel dropped the effort after seeing the costs - their markets are not very interested in such a listing.

In any case, such products are not a 'pipe dope' in the usual sense. Rather, they keep threads from rusting together. Anti-seize compounds eventually evaporate, leaving a film of fine metal dust between pieces.

I can also understand someone using Scotch-Kote on assembled connections; perhaps for sealing, perhaps to help keep the threads from rusting. "Cut" metal will rust much quicker than metal with a 'mill finish.'
We used to use it a lot in chem plants, thank god the last contractors used it too... It makes it a heck of a lot easier to get stuff apart later. Also helps when spinning on boxes etc .
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Old 08-17-2012, 12:53 AM   #53
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If your going to do a lot of threading, build a 6'x6' out of 2x4's and line with plastic, than kitty litter (fresh) or some other oil absorbing material, and put threader in center of 6x6 frame. Oil spills and mess is contained to the 6'x6', works great. It can also double as a penalty box for apprentices.
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Old 08-17-2012, 07:24 AM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LightsOn81 View Post
When it comes to installing and threading, use a screwdriver to break the threads before you back the die off. This will preserve the life on the teeth. .
I am not familiar with this technique
Can you explain?
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Old 08-17-2012, 11:45 PM   #55
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I am not familiar with this technique
Can you explain?
I believe what he is saying is to 'clean' out the threading dye before reversing the threader, continue to oil on reverse as this serves two purposes; keeps thread dye cool and lubricates.
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Old 08-17-2012, 11:49 PM   #56
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Good to know... Now where's Niteshift?
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Old 08-18-2012, 12:29 AM   #57
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Quote:
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I believe what he is saying is to 'clean' out the threading dye before reversing the threader, continue to oil on reverse as this serves two purposes; keeps thread dye cool and lubricates.
Thats how I do it.
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Old 08-18-2012, 01:23 AM   #58
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Originally Posted by JDJ View Post
Kopper-Kote? Budweiser had that for all RobRoy installations. Conductivity and helped against corrosion.
That would be against the manufacturers directions
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Old 08-18-2012, 07:30 AM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 360max View Post
I believe what he is saying is to 'clean' out the threading dye before reversing the threader, continue to oil on reverse as this serves two purposes; keeps thread dye cool and lubricates.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awg-Dawg View Post
Thats how I do it.
Always do that , just wondering what he meant by "break".
Those little shavings can wreck a set of teeth
And as been mentioned, use lots of oil
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Old 08-18-2012, 01:59 PM   #60
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Thank you for all the knowledge! I'm going to be graduating next friday and I'm realizing that I have so much more to learn! I have an apprentice (1st year ) working with me and was able to share with him the stuff you have all let me know. As well as some other things I've picked up over the years.

We installed a run of 2 inch today and we both did well. We took careful measurements and it turned out great. Made the foreman happy and only had to use 1 union.
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