What do you do with your scrap wire? - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum > Electrical Forum > General Electrical Discussion


Like Tree18Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-09-2016, 10:47 AM   #1
Administrator
 
Cricket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Texas Strong
Posts: 3,128
Rewards Points: 5,934
Default What do you do with your scrap wire?

What do you do with your scrap wire?-scrap-lge.jpg

Quote:
"If you can prepare your scrap and haul it yourself, the scrap yard is the way to go to maximize your return on unusable materials. If you get in the habit of prepping, sorting and storing your scrap after each job, you can save time and get a hefty payout with just one or two trips to the metal recycling yard each year." Disposing of Scrap Wire and Excess Parts
What do you do with your scrap wire?
chicken steve likes this.
__________________
"Show respect even to people who dont deserve it, not as
a reflection of their character, but as a reflection of yours."
Cricket is offline   Reply With Quote
Join Contractor Talk

Join the #1 Electrician Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

ElectricianTalk.com - Are you a Professional Electrical Contractor? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's the leading place for electricians to meet online. No homeowners asking DIY questions. Just fellow tradesmen who enjoy talking about their business, their trade, and anything else that comes up. No matter what your specialty is you'll find that ElectricianTalk.com is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free!

Join ElectricianTalk.com - Click Here JOIN FOR FREE


Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ElectricianTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-09-2016, 12:04 PM   #2
Spaghetti Cleaner
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 928
Rewards Points: 540
Default

Goes in a barrel till it's full then recycled, usually around $100
__________________
Thread shorter.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
sarness is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 07:59 PM   #3
Retired Account
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: the Green Mountain state
Posts: 39,722
Rewards Points: 14,650
Default

Scrap plays a rather motivating part of our apprenticeship sanitation training here @ chicken electric


~CS~
danhasenauer, Cricket and Majewski like this.
chicken steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-09-2016, 08:31 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
cad99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 321
Rewards Points: 6
Default

Goes in a job trailer until time to clean the trailer. Split up on with whom ever worked the job it came off. Money must be used for tools is the only deal.


Living the dream one nightmare at a time
Majewski likes this.
__________________
350 3D Bonus Points
cad99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 08:56 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
dawgs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2,428
Rewards Points: 1,008
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cricket
What do you do with your scrap wire?
I bring it to the scrap yard.
dawgs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 09:19 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Service Call's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Daytona Beach
Posts: 1,879
Rewards Points: 28
Default

I turn it into cash
Service Call is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 10:20 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 204
Rewards Points: 218
Default

we take our scrap to the scrap yard. To be recycled.
Scrap is way down lately.
Teaspoon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 10:41 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
cabletie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: N.J.
Posts: 1,698
Rewards Points: 1,274
Default

What does not go back to the shop, Our scrap yard makes house calls.

http://dr-copper.com/metaleducation.htm

No charge for pickup, same price if you bring it to them.

Interesting name, if you search the meaning. Wall Street calls on copper prices to check the health of the economy.
cabletie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 11:18 PM   #9
Big nosed attic troll
 
Majewski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: In a van down by the river!
Posts: 7,544
Rewards Points: 2,774
Default

I collect it so that my wife starts to resent me.
cad99 likes this.
Majewski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 11:23 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
joe cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Yolo County, California
Posts: 339
Rewards Points: 408
Default

Add it to the pile of copper spaghetti threatening to consume my entire basement. I mean to scrap it someday, but for now I am a hoarder.
Oakey and Majewski like this.
joe cool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2016, 07:30 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
MikeFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: The Sunshine State
Posts: 5,460
Rewards Points: 3,018
Default

Friends of mine are into large scale recycling with plants in several states. Here's a copper snip from their website (they got the info from copper.org).

Copper Recycling Facts **www.copper.org

A Boeing 727 contains about 9,000 pounds of copper
We're in no danger of running out of copper. Known worldwide resources of this important and valuable metal are estimated at nearly 5.8 trillion pounds of which only about 0.7 trillion (12%) have been mined throughout history.
Nearly all of that 0.7 trillion (or 700 billion) pounds is still in circulation because copper's recycling rate is higher than that of any other engineering metal.
Until well into the 1800s, most copper used in the U.S.A. had to be imported. Today, we are virtually self-sufficient and, worldwide, second only to Chile in production.
Each year in the U.S.A., nearly as much copper is recovered from recycled material as is derived from newly mined ore. Excluding wire production, most of which uses newly refined copper, more than three-fourths of the amount used by copper and brass mills, ingot makers, foundries, powder plants and other industries comes from recycled scrap.
Almost half of all recycled copper scrap is old post-consumer scrap, such as discarded electric cable, junked automobile radiators and air conditioners, or even ancient Egyptian plumbing. (Yes, it's been around that long.)
The remainder is new scrap, such as chips and turnings from screw machine production.
U.S. copper mine production in 2002 dropped to 2,516 million pounds from 2001's 2,954 million pounds.
The 2002 level of 7,313 million pounds is a 6.0% decrease from the revised 2001 level of 7,780 million pounds.
Exports of mill products in 2002 continued to decline also, down 7.1% at 735 million pounds versus imports of 909 million pounds, a decrease of 10.0% from 2001 levels.
The Statue of Liberty is made entirely of copper which is the reason it is green (from Patina(fancy for rust)). After being up since 1886 the weathering and oxidation of the copper skin has amounted to just .005 of an inch.
The Statue of Liberty is made of 179,000 pounds of copper
Copper is man's oldest metal, dating back more than 10,000 years. A copper pendant discovered in what is now northern Iraq goes back to about 8700 B.C.
The H.M.S. Beagle, used by Charles Darwin for his historic voyages around the world, was built in 1825 with copper skins below the water line. The copper sheathing extended hull life and protected against barnacles and other kinds of biofouling. Today most seagoing vessels use a copper-containing paint for hull protection.
Paul Revere, of Revolutionary War fame, produced the copper hull sheathing, bronze cannon, spikes and pumps for the U.S.S. Constitution, known as "Old Ironsides." Revere was one of the earliest American coppersmiths.
One of the famous Dead Sea Scrolls found in Israel is made of copper instead of more fragile animal skins. The scroll contains no biblical passages or religious writings - only clues to a still undiscovered treasure.
Archeologists have recovered a portion of a water plumbing system from the Pyramid of Cheops in Egypt. The copper tubing used was found in serviceable condition after more than 5,000 years.
A museum at the University of Pennsylvania displays a copper frying pan that has been dated to be more than 50 centuries old.
Some things never change! Ten thousand years ago, cave dwellers used copper axes as weapons and tools for survival. Today, high tech surgeons save lives and precious blood by using copper-clad scalpels. The copper conducts an electric current that heats the scalpel to make it self-cauterizing.
The first copper deposit worked extensively in America (by non-native Americans) is located in Granby, Connecticut. It was operated from 1705 until 1770.
Pure copper's melting point is 1,981F (1,083C).
Brasses and Bronzes are probably the most well-known families of copper-base alloys. Brasses are mainly copper and zinc. Bronzes are mainly copper along with alloying elements such as tin, aluminum, silicon or beryllium.
Zebra mussels, brought to North America on freighters from Europe, are kept from clogging the water intakes of power companies around the Great Lakes through the use of copper alloy screens that reject their attachment and impede growth.
An average single-family home uses 439 pounds of copper.
In an average single-family home, you will find about:
195 pounds - building wire
151 pounds - plumbing tube, fillings, valves
24 pounds - plumbers' brass goods
47 pounds - built-in appliances
12 pounds - builders hardware
10 pounds - other wire and tube
An average multifamily unit uses 278 pounds of copper:
125 pounds - building wire
82 pounds - plumbing tube, fittings, valves
20 pounds - plumbers' brass goods
38 pounds - built-in appliances
6 pounds - builders hardware
7 pounds - other wire and tube
General levels of copper use in major appliances:
52 pounds - unitary air conditioner
48 pounds - unitary heat pump
5.0 pounds - dishwasher
4.8 pounds - refrigerator/freezer
4.4 pounds - clothes washer
2.7 pounds - dehumidifier
2.3 pounds - disposer
2.0 pounds - clothes dryer
1.3 pounds - range
Some 10,000 copper range hoods and 20,000 weather vanes are produced annually, using about 7 pounds of copper each.
The average house has 12 lockset's: 2 are keyed, the rest are passage sets. The average multifamily unit has 6 lockset's - 1 keyed, the remainder are passage sets.
There are probably about a billion doorknobs in the U.S., weighing in with about 500-600 million pounds of copper.
There is an average of 50-55 electrical outlets per home and some 15-20 switches. That translates to between 2 and 3 pounds of copper alloy for these uses per house.
chicken steve likes this.
__________________
Michael Gookin, President
GPS Timers

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

(833) GPS-TIME
MikeFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2016, 07:38 AM   #12
Coffee drinking member
 
Wirenuting's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Ceti Alpha V
Posts: 11,968
Rewards Points: 5,522
Default

I toss it in the trash dumpster.
It's the law of the land here.
Majewski likes this.
__________________
Teacher, my brain is full... Can I go home now?
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Wirenuting is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Wirenuting For This Useful Post:
millelec (05-19-2016)
Old 05-10-2016, 07:41 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Orange, ca.
Posts: 160
Rewards Points: 48
Default

Used to be you could pay your self 100+ an hour by stripping it but copper ain't worth jack right now


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Electrozappo is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Electrozappo For This Useful Post:
Old 05-10-2016, 07:57 AM   #14
Ditch Digging Dummy
 
3D Electric's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 1,860
Rewards Points: 52
Default

We collect it in bins then our scrapper comes to us. Last time we cashed it in was 3 or 4 weeks ago. Got $750. Use the money for the guys. New tools, shirts, boots, etc.
Majewski likes this.
3D Electric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2016, 08:03 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
dawgs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2,428
Rewards Points: 1,008
Default

Some of it I let the guys take. The rest comes back to the shop, gets sorted in bins. #4 and larger goes through the stripping machine. Last cash in was over 4g.
dawgs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2016, 03:22 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 683
Rewards Points: 52
Default

We save it. We bought a stripper that we fitted a motor and gear reduction up to. When copper prices were high we had a dump truck full of stripped copper. We got 3.60 a pound ...... It was a good day
TRurak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2016, 11:40 AM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: WA
Posts: 51
Rewards Points: 86
Default

i have so little of it i just throw it in the recycle bin they pick up every two weeks and be done with it.
bullheimer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2016, 11:44 AM   #18
Moderator

 
Dennis Alwon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Posts: 21,173
Rewards Points: 1,346
Default

I save it in a bin I built until it is full-- usually a good long bed truck load piled high-- $600-$700 minimum and have gotten as much as $1300-- this is non stripped nm cable.

I split it with my workers
Dennis Alwon is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2016, 11:46 AM   #19
Mensa Player
 
HackWork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: -
Posts: 33,802
Rewards Points: 777
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bullheimer View Post
i have so little of it i just throw it in the recycle bin they pick up every two weeks and be done with it.
Someone is making money off of you. Throw it in an old trash can and let it build up. Some day you will have a free couple hundred bucks.
HackWork is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2016, 11:49 AM   #20
Mensa Player
 
HackWork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: -
Posts: 33,802
Rewards Points: 777
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
I save it in a bin I built until it is full-- usually a good long bed truck load piled high-- $600-$700 minimum and have gotten as much as $1300-- this is non stripped nm cable.

I split it with my workers
I'm surprised you have that much scrap NM, Dennis.

I usually use the shorter pieces for jumpers between boxes in kitchens, or bathroom lights, or outlets on opposite sides of the wall, etc. The real short pieces I cut up into pigtails.
HackWork is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Branch circuit wire for a 12v dc off grid solar cabin Off Grid Alternative Energy Forum 14 05-12-2016 08:13 AM
Wire Strippers for #18 stranded 2 conductor !Tom Tools, Equipment and New Products 22 05-04-2016 08:22 PM
Alpha STRP-25 Wire Strippers refills Neil-sparks General Electrical Discussion 5 03-16-2016 10:53 PM
8ga Aluminum Oven Wire vs 8ga Copper Wire? savatreatabvr General Electrical Discussion 17 01-13-2016 07:57 AM
Fixture Wire power General Electrical Discussion 5 01-12-2016 01:13 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com