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Old 10-24-2007, 05:39 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Bkessler View Post
In Michigan you can 50k a year no problem with insurance payed vacation and a company truck. but you have to work 8-10 years and be a hard worker, go above any employers expectation and have your journeymens license.
And also the housing market is very very slow in michigan. My parents house has been for sale for 2 years.
That's apprentice pay in my local. An "A" wireman in LU 3 out of NYC will do 80k-100k while working on a variety of projects, with good medical benefits, great retirement, and an overall good benefits package.
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Old 10-24-2007, 07:02 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by randomkiller View Post
That's apprentice pay in my local. An "A" wireman in LU 3 out of NYC will do 80k-100k while working on a variety of projects, with good medical benefits, great retirement, and an overall good benefits package.
The problem working with local 3 in NYC is that you have to work for local 3 in NYC.
You could not pay me $300k to work for those guys!! .....or to work in those areas/conditions/locations/etc.

Give me that kind of work for $300k WAY upstate, or maybe in Maine somewhere and I'm in.
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Old 10-24-2007, 12:40 PM   #23
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Joe:

What is that project?
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Old 10-24-2007, 02:39 PM   #24
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In the UK most residential electricians will be earning £30.000/50,000 - ($60,000/100,000) if they are on piece work. If you are self employed and sub contracting to some other Company then this should be $100,000 to whatever. The men I work with try and average £75,000 $150,000). For this it means price work - early start, late finish and perfect no return faults.

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Old 10-24-2007, 03:32 PM   #25
 
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Jed,

Don't spend that kinda' money . . .

Get a paying job in some electrical area and ease into the trade (earn while you learn). There are soo many facits in the electrical industry. Now-a-daz more facits than ever.

I started as an SPA (Sound/Public/Address) person, and eventually metriculating into the 600 volt world.

Then there is the union/non-union debate. Both have their merits. Union training is the best IMO. Just look at Joe Mommas picture posts here.

I was an industrial contractor for most of my 35 year tenure. That is what I enjoyed. But I recently visited some new homes being constructed, and was impressed by the things I never knew about residential electrical. The field is wide open, and difficult to advise you how to start. But keep that 30k in your pocket . . .

Best Wishes
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Old 10-24-2007, 08:50 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
The problem working with local 3 in NYC is that you have to work for local 3 in NYC.
You could not pay me $300k to work for those guys!! .....or to work in those areas/conditions/locations/etc.

Give me that kind of work for $300k WAY upstate, or maybe in Maine somewhere and I'm in.

I have been working in NJ mostly in local 164 territory for the last two years, I am only in the city on rare occasion. I also moved down here to get away from too much travel time. A few years back I did some work up in the Albany area (Renseleer Poly Tech College), you can have those working conditions with 3' of snow on the site and winds whipping through the buildings.
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Old 10-24-2007, 09:34 PM   #27
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Joe:

What is that project?

Round here it's simply called Murray Hospital. The owners are "intermountain health care", and it's supposed to be the biggest/greatest west of the mississippi.
I think it lasted 4 years and opened this past summer, though there are still more smaller buildings going up around it.
It was the first major project of the building boom we're experiencing now that's said to continue for at least 2 more years. Proctor and gamble announced recently they'll be breaking ground on a 300Million dollar project early next year here.
Gotta love it when times are good
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Old 10-24-2007, 10:53 PM   #28
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Old 10-24-2007, 10:55 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by randomkiller View Post
That's apprentice pay in my local. An "A" wireman in LU 3 out of NYC will do 80k-100k while working on a variety of projects, with good medical benefits, great retirement, and an overall good benefits package.
The cost of living in that area is waaaaaaaaaay higher than most places also. That 80-100k won't get you very far in NYC. BTW, what's an "A" wireman?

Just curious, but for non-union what is the average starting pay ($/hr) for residential helpers around the country? What about residential crew leaders wiring custom homes?
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Old 10-25-2007, 02:48 AM   #30
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Right now in Michigan the housing market sucks. I dont think you could even find a job wiring houses much less make 50k doing it. Areas out west seem to be booming with all kinds of incentives to get people to go there. I wouldn't spend 30k on school regardless. An apprenticeship program will take care of that for you on the companies dime. Maybe 10 years from now when Michigan finally recovers from the Granholm disaster you could find work here but not now.
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Old 10-25-2007, 05:57 AM   #31
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I started as an apprentice in 1973. IBEW Railroad. Then went to construction IBEW 349.
Then I moved to SC. at age 31 and found work in manufacturing/industrial.
This is where I really found my niche. I love control work. I learned how draw my own schematics, build control panels from my own drawings, and implement the results.
The satisfaction of seeing a machine operate efficiently and reliably, and know I did it is one of my biggest rushes.
If you want to make the most money, industrial would be a good choice.
Look for a entry level maintenance position with a mid to large company if possible. Express your interest in electrical work. Find the best electrician in the plant and try to work with him all you can. Good electricians like to work with energetic willing to learn type of guys. Most all great electricians like to teach. They are not afraid to show you to much. They want you to succede as much as you do. Give it a shot.
John is right, this is exactly what I did to get started 12 years ago. I am still doing basically the same thing. Industrial work will expose you to almost all the trade. If you can do industrial then wiring a house for side money is like sleep walking. I've not paid for any schooling out of my own pocket, only thing I have purchased over the years are books I wanted to read not told to read. Hands on with experience over your shoulder is the best way to go.
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Old 10-25-2007, 09:02 AM   #32
 
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I got into this trade late... 32. I was under the impression I would be wiring houses. As a matter of fact that was the first thing I did. After it was conduit, controls, MC ... a little bit of everything. As a union outfit, we seemed to only do houses when the commercial and industrial markets were slow. Which happens like the rising and falling of the tides.

I agree with everyone on not paying for your schooling. The IBEW apprentership is a good route. Five years of schooling using a standardized class work. I'm sure most will agree that 90% of your skills as a mechanic will be learned in the field. Having a good tool partner is the key. Some people just don't wanna train others.

Also the regulations in your area could be different then in other areas of the country. In Maine the home owner can pull an electrical permit for ANYTHING except a service change. As you can imagine, we have above average amounts of house fires! (just a joke)

I have a contraxctor friend ho makes a decent living wiring houses with one apprentice. He will be the first to admit the competition for bids is incredible. So much he chose to drop out of the union because of wages.
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Old 11-06-2007, 06:28 AM   #33
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[quote=gilbequick;10839]The cost of living in that area is waaaaaaaaaay higher than most places also. That 80-100k won't get you very far in NYC. BTW, what's an "A" wireman?


An "A" wireman is an "A" book division (construction/new work) union electrician, not to be confused with "J" guys that do street lighting and signal work, or any of other divisions that cover utility workers and other tasks.

FYI, $100k base pay will do you fine in this area, with OT and a working spouse you can be comfortable.
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Old 12-06-2007, 02:28 PM   #34
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Old 12-06-2007, 04:32 PM   #35
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An "A" wireman is an "A" book division (construction/new work) union electrician, not to be confused with "J" guys that do street lighting and signal work, or any of other divisions that cover utility workers and other tasks.

You guys are up to "M" right?
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Old 12-06-2007, 11:35 PM   #36
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Joe, nice work. It's great to see another who takes pride in their pipe work.
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