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Old 05-11-2020, 02:20 PM   #1
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Default 1920s overhead crane controls

Pictures I took of a 10 ton Pawling and Harnischfeger Bridge Crane installed in one of our buildings in 1924. Anyone ever heard of the electric controller and manufacturing company?
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Old 05-11-2020, 03:00 PM   #2
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https://www.hubbell.com/ecm/en/
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Old 05-11-2020, 05:54 PM   #3
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You never know who made controls back then. I had a boring machine from back then (1924) that Colt Fire Arms made the reversing starter. Colt NOARK. was electrical end & it became Federal NOARK.
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Old 05-11-2020, 07:20 PM   #4
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EC&M, later were bought/merged into Square D. Somewhere I have a NEMA 2 starter that says EC&M a division of Square D.
I think EC&M were big in the DC controller scene.
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Old 05-11-2020, 09:37 PM   #5
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In that time frame there were many small electrical manufacturers, especially in specialized controls. Most didn't last long. The successful companies were bought or merged with the larger companies to where we now mostly have a few huge companies.
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Old 05-12-2020, 05:08 AM   #6
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The crane might be from the 20’s but the controls look like they were retrofitted in the 50’s


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Old 05-12-2020, 05:47 AM   #7
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Quote:
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Quote:
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EC&M, later were bought/merged into Square D. Somewhere I have a NEMA 2 starter that says EC&M a division of Square D.
I think EC&M were big in the DC controller scene.
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In that time frame there were many small electrical manufacturers, especially in specialized controls. Most didn't last long. The successful companies were bought or merged with the larger companies to where we now mostly have a few huge companies.
If you follow the Hubbell link and look at the pictures on the ECM section of the site, you see that ECM logo in the OP's pictures, and also see old pictures of products with the Square D emblem. Interesting that this company / brand has been passed around like a bottle of cheap wine, but the products appear to be relatively unchanged all these years.
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Old 05-12-2020, 02:16 PM   #8
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Quote:
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If you follow the Hubbell link and look at the pictures on the ECM section of the site, you see that ECM logo in the OP's pictures, and also see old pictures of products with the Square D emblem. Interesting that this company / brand has been passed around like a bottle of cheap wine, but the products appear to be relatively unchanged all these years.

Yes. EC&M was sold to Square D, then when Schneider bought Sq. D., they jettisoned a lot of low volume product lines and Hubbell Industrial bought that division.


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Old 05-12-2020, 02:42 PM   #9
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There's actually 2 cranes one on each end of the building on the same system. One is still operationable. 250vdc exposed conductor lines. The building was knob and tube until 2015. Had some exposed solid core wiring overhead dont know what it was for. Still has some colt disconnects and alot of bulldog products. Was bulldog towards the top in terms of high quality back in the day?

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Old 05-12-2020, 02:43 PM   #10
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Building was part of the old bucyrus erie plant that made draglines
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Old 05-12-2020, 02:48 PM   #11
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Also has some old Trumbull, Westinghouse, and Clark Disconnects. Along with some old ITE switchgear that still has knob and tube ran to it
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Old 05-12-2020, 07:36 PM   #12
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That would be like working in an electrical history museum. I would bet that most of this ancient equipment still works. There is probably some really interesting switchgear and power distribution at this plant.
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Old 05-12-2020, 08:35 PM   #13
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Quote:
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Building was part of the old bucyrus erie plant that made draglines
Milwaukee? I toured the Bucyrus plant there. It was immense.
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Old 05-13-2020, 10:06 AM   #14
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Building was part of the old bucyrus erie plant that made draglines
Milwaukee? I toured the Bucyrus plant there. It was immense.
Evansville, Indiana they had a couple different plants. I know they also had one in Erie, Pennsylvania.
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Old 05-13-2020, 10:09 AM   #15
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Most of the buildings still have part of the railroad tracks ran through them. They would disassemble and ship by train to the Ohio River then ship by barge to the location and then reassemble the draglines.
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Old 05-14-2020, 09:23 PM   #16
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Quote:
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There's actually 2 cranes one on each end of the building on the same system. One is still operationable. 250vdc exposed conductor lines. The building was knob and tube until 2015. Had some exposed solid core wiring overhead dont know what it was for. Still has some colt disconnects and alot of bulldog products. Was bulldog towards the top in terms of high quality back in the day?
I worked for a company that had P&H as their main product line. Shannahan Crane&Hoist had MO. IA. KS. NE. southern Illinois and Indiana as territory. I always like "Clark" products but they where old when I worked on them. No reason the pictures are not original equipment. The oldest still in use crane I worked on was P&H from 1899 at Laclede Steel in East St. Louis, IL. But that was over 25 years ago and it was D/C.
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