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Old 07-18-2009, 08:54 PM   #1
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Default CGFI short problem

I need an opinion. I've got 1 CGFI outlet and three switches.

Switch A controls power to the CGFI outlet, switch B&C run to one interior light and one exterior light respectively. Switch A can be on and the outlet can have a load with out a problem as long as switch B&C are both off. Switch B&C function fine as long as switch A is off, but if switch A is on along with either switch B or C then the CGFI trips the breaker and I lose power to switch A,B and C.

The wiring is done all wrong (multiple blacks from one box, bad connections, etc.) but I don't want to dive to deep until I have a better idea about what I am looking at here.

Thanks
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Old 07-18-2009, 09:00 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McCool View Post
I need an opinion. I've got 1 CGFI outlet and three switches.

Switch A controls power to the CGFI outlet, switch B&C run to one interior light and one exterior light respectively. Switch A can be on and the outlet can have a load with out a problem as long as switch B&C are both off. Switch B&C function fine as long as switch A is off, but if switch A is on along with either switch B or C then the CGFI trips the breaker and I lose power to switch A,B and C.

The wiring is done all wrong (multiple blacks from one box, bad connections, etc.) but I don't want to dive to deep until I have a better idea about what I am looking at here.

Thanks
My best guess is either there is a neutral touching something grounded or a you have two neutrals tied together or crossed.
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Old 07-18-2009, 09:13 PM   #3
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My best guess is either there is a neutral touching something grounded or a you have two neutrals tied together or crossed.
Don't know if you noticed, Bob, but he's north of the border. Maybe GFCI's there aren't the same as ours (like in the UK where they're RCDs). Not being 'fluent' in Canadian wiring, I can't say, though.
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Old 07-18-2009, 09:32 PM   #4
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Don't know if you noticed, Bob, but he's north of the border.
One them Canadians eh?

Well then I can not help them.



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Maybe GFCI's there aren't the same as ours (like in the UK where they're RCDs). Not being 'fluent' in Canadian wiring, I can't say, though.
Pretty sure they are GFCIs like ours not the RCDs which I know nothing about.
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Old 07-19-2009, 06:03 PM   #5
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The GFCIs in Canada are identical to American ones; most sold are also UL listed along with CSA. One difference is that all GFCIs in Canada have been required to have a pilot lamp for the last couple of years; I don't know what the rule is in the US.
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Old 07-20-2009, 12:51 PM   #6
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Our GFIs are snow proof, since they are covered in snow all year.
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Old 07-22-2009, 09:05 PM   #7
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In the 2007 code they upgraded the snowproofing to plastic; prior to that we could use a spare beaver pelt and we'd be fine...
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