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Old 02-12-2017, 11:15 PM   #1
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Default Crimp sleeves

You guys ever use these? How do you crimp them? On the back it states to crimp them using a GCP-5000A, which is nearly impossible to find seems like. I have the tool finally after talking with GB about it a bit, and this is what they look like crimped properly, never seen that in the field, thats for sure.
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Old 02-12-2017, 11:17 PM   #2
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Old 02-12-2017, 11:20 PM   #3
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Always known them as Buchanan crimps, been around a very long time.

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Old 02-12-2017, 11:59 PM   #4
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I use a stay con tool from T&B
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Old 02-13-2017, 06:52 AM   #5
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Always known them as Buchanan crimps, been around a very long time.

This is the correct tool but, they are rare jut due to the inconvenient large size. I've seen everything used to crimp them including, and mostly, the built in crimper on a pair of linemans.
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Old 02-13-2017, 06:56 AM   #6
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Always known them as Buchanan crimps, been around a very long time.

I've always thought of Buchanan caps as the crimp type with the rubber wrap around and sometimes, the red little crown that goes over the top.

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Old 02-13-2017, 07:25 AM   #7
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This is the correct tool but, they are rare jut due to the inconvenient large size. I've seen everything used to crimp them including, and mostly, the built in crimper on a pair of linemans.
Never thought of using linemans, I gues sbecause when I first used them the tool was there with them.

The crimper fits in an apron pocket or back pants pocket.
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Old 02-13-2017, 07:26 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Suncoast Power View Post
I've always thought of Buchanan caps as the crimp type with the rubber wrap around and sometimes, the red little crown that goes over the top.

Hmm, maybe it's an area jargon thing, haven't seen the rubber caps in the northeast.
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Old 02-13-2017, 07:33 AM   #9
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I came up in Va Beach working for assorted Hack Electric contractors. In the early 70's, we used them and I was shown to twist the grounds tight together, then cut off all but one (or two if you needed them) ground, slide the crimp sleeve over it and crimp it as tight as you can using the tips of the linesman pliers (this was before they put that crimp tool in the linesman).

I know now that I was taught incorrectly, but I don't think anyone ever had a problem with the grounds.

I've never heard or seen anyone using a "proper" crimp tool for these (unless you call the crimp tool on the linesman pliers to be "proper"). I don't know if the linesman crimp area is listed for use as crimp sleeve tool, but it appears to me to work just fine for that purpose and I would not hesitate to use it for that.
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Old 02-13-2017, 07:38 AM   #10
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Buchanans are still Buchanans except Ideal bought Buchanan.

http://idealind.com/us/en/products/w...onnectors.aspx

I might be the only person on the planet that gave a rats tar star but I bought an Ideal linemans and buy Ideal crimp sleeves because the label on Ideal crimp sleeves specify that tool, making it fully compliant with their listing and legal to crimp sleeves with them.

Others may disagree but I have stopped using them for the most part. Once in a while one of the wires comes loose. I start using them again with the four-way crimper, the Ideal C42, but haven't felt like putting out $65 for one yet.

Incidentally the Ideal linemans is nice but at $40 I should have just shelled out for the best tool for the job.
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Old 02-13-2017, 08:17 AM   #11
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I haven't used one in 20 years. There are 0 places where these work that a wirenut doesn't. There are a couple of instances where the crimps are more convenient, but not so much that I justify buying them and loosing them in the truck.
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Old 02-13-2017, 08:28 AM   #12
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I haven't used one in 20 years. There are 0 places where these work that a wirenut doesn't. There are a couple of instances where the crimps are more convenient, but not so much that I justify buying them and loosing them in the truck.
Yup, that's about the time frame that pops in my mind. I agree with you on the rest of the post as well.
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Old 02-13-2017, 09:42 AM   #13
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I haven't used one in 20 years. There are 0 places where these work that a wirenut doesn't. There are a couple of instances where the crimps are more convenient, but not so much that I justify buying them and loosing them in the truck.
But 50% of the time they are way more convenient.

A) They are much smaller than a wire nut so if space is tight they help.
B) In multi-gang boxes you leave out as many tails as there are devices. Each device gets it own tail with no extra splicing.

I use the steel ones from Ideal (or whoever). The instructions say to crimp with a Sta-Con style crimper, or the crimper built into linemans (which is what I use). I typically don't lose them because I keep them in a specific spot in a drawer.
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Old 02-13-2017, 09:46 AM   #14
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I use them on every single motor connection we do. They intimidate the maintenance guy a bit and they just don't fail very often.
If I did new homes I would use them for the grounds to make the stupid assed pigtails to a ll switches that we have to do now. One of the more idiotic codes out there.

This is what I use.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Ideal-4-W...B&gclsrc=aw.ds
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Old 02-13-2017, 09:53 AM   #15
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I used them in 1969. Still have the 4 point tool. Actually I think they are around $100 on Amazon. Still mine is old if I can find it.

Edit: As listed by @sbrn33 - $62 at HD.
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Old 02-13-2017, 09:57 AM   #16
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I use them on every single motor connection we do. They intimidate the maintenance guy a bit and they just don't fail very often.
If I did new homes I would use them for the grounds to make the stupid assed pigtails to a ll switches that we have to do now. One of the more idiotic codes out there.
I figure I am going to buy the C24 soon to try out for places I don't have the usual confidence in a wire nut, motors and electric heat thermostats come to mind.

The bigger sleeves don't list the lineman's pliers on the instructions.

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Old 02-13-2017, 10:11 AM   #17
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But 50% of the time they are way more convenient.

A) They are much smaller than a wire nut so if space is tight they help.
B) In multi-gang boxes you leave out as many tails as there are devices. Each device gets it own tail with no extra splicing.
That's the situation where they are more convenient.

I suppose if all I did was new houses, I might use them more. Now that I think about, that's when I carried them, wiring new houses. Since I avoid that like the plague these days, I don't have much use for them. Just another thing to get lost in the rolling explosion I call a van.
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Old 02-13-2017, 10:14 AM   #18
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I use them on every single motor connection we do. They intimidate the maintenance guy a bit and they just don't fail very often.
If I did new homes I would use them for the grounds to make the stupid assed pigtails to a ll switches that we have to do now. One of the more idiotic codes out there.
I like the insulated Ideal splice caps for motor leads.

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Old 02-13-2017, 11:51 AM   #19
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I haven't used them since 1976 when I went to work for a certain contractor as an apprentice. The new guys I started working with just laughed when I said the previous contractors I worked for did use them.

I believe the ones we used were made by T&B and were called PT70's & PT70-M. We crimped them using an original T&B Sta-con tool.

I hate 'em as you cannot easily disconnect them. Have to cut them. These just bring back bad memories.
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Old 02-13-2017, 11:57 AM   #20
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I haven't used them since 1976 when I went to work for a certain contractor as an apprentice. The new guys I started working with just laughed when I said the previous contractors I worked for did use them.

I believe the ones we used were made by T&B and were called PT70's & PT70-M. We crimped them using an original T&B Sta-con tool.

I hate 'em as you cannot easily disconnect them. Have to cut them. These just bring back bad memories.
How often would you have to remove them?
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